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Old Apr 27, 2006, 1:44 AM   #21
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Jim, if you look at the back of the squirrel, there is a very brightopen spot between the leaves, similar to the background of Sue's #1 shot. However, you see no purple fringing around the leaves. I can post dozen of photos taken with the H1 showing very high contrast with absolutely no purple fringing, unless you crop the heck out of it (see other examples below). I think the S2 problem is much more evident.I've read Steve's reviews and I've seen hisphoto comparisons. Although I agree with you that "theoretically" speaking,comparing two shots of the same exact subject taken at the same exact timeisan ideal way to compare results,I don't believe they are 100% representative. You don't find problems withAF takingshots of a building or a restaurant or a playground but of difficult subjects (like a bird on the feeder). The same applies with purple fringing. Most of Steve's photo samples do not have areas of very high contrast, reason why both cameras did well in this area.
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Old Apr 27, 2006, 1:46 AM   #22
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Where's the purple fringing? The edges of the heavily lit white fence should present some!
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Old Apr 27, 2006, 1:53 AM   #23
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This one I increased contrast and added sharpening and although some fringing can be seen, it's very minor despite the high contrast.
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Old Apr 27, 2006, 5:54 AM   #24
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I've taken heaps of bird images with my S2 - so long as you choose a good pre-focus target and use focus-lock, the main issues are subject-motion-blur, camera-shake, and depth-of-field.

When zoomed to the max any amount of shade will require an exposure that is too slow to freeze all movement and elimate shake. Flash can help - but the subject then looks flashed - an improvised difuser (piece of paper) might help.

The S2 is slower to auto-focus than the H1 - so use pre-focus. The S2 is faster at taking multiple shots - use this advantage - take bursts of shots.

In poor light focus hunt can occur, but this is much less of an issue than subject motion and shake (for birds/wildlife).

If you zoom to the max and then open up the lens to f/3.5 to let in more light, depth of field will be very limited. Unless the subject is small, some part of the subject is going to be out of focus. If the depth-of-field is limited, accurate pre-focus becomes even more important. Using less zoom greatly increases the depth of field.

If the subject is in the shade and you're not using flash, use less than maximum zoom if you can. Have the camera locked on ISO 100 to minimise noise and grain. Have it set to continous shooting at the highest speed - let at least two shots fire for every press of the shutter button. For any kind of moving subject you should be aiming to achieve 1/1000 sec or at least 1/500 sec - but at full zoom this almost never possible if the subject is in the shade.

If there is a lot of constrast in a scene it can pay to move to around f/5.6 and underexpose a bit - this minimises any purple-fringing.

See my samples at http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
In some cases I've included some brief notes on technique.



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Old Apr 27, 2006, 6:37 AM   #25
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Thank you for all of your help - advice - suggestions. Here's the photo imported using Irfanview. This shot was taken using the camera defualt settings - auto mode with no filters. After taking about 40 distance shots last night, I was never able to get even 1 good clear shot. I did try using P mode with Vivid set, and didn't notice any difference. My friend came over who's used his brothers S2, and he wasn't able to use the Manual focus either. It seems that the only chance I have of getting any good shots in Sanibel Island is to go spend Mega bucks at the local camera store to either buy a good HD zoom lens for my digital Rebel EOS 300D, or to buy something different. Maybe I'm too dense to figure out this S2.

You guys have been great...

Uggg. I pulled the picture directly from my SD card and resized it using Irfanview to 640 x 480. It won't let me attach - says file too large. Please see screen shot and tell me what I'm doing wrong so that I can send you the picture.

thanks
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Old Apr 27, 2006, 6:57 AM   #26
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When you use the File, Save As menu choice to save the image after resizing it, move the quality slider (you'll see it popup) down to around 85 and it should be small enough.

Make sure to give it a new filename and attach the resized image, not the original.

If you don't click OK when you resize (the screen shot you posted), then save the image to a new filename (use File, Save As), you won't have changed anything.


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Old Apr 27, 2006, 7:06 AM   #27
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I'm going to try attaching directly from my SD card. Hope this works.
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Old Apr 27, 2006, 7:15 AM   #28
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Jim - you're the best. I think I got it this time. The slider only apperared when I chenged it to a JPEG.
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Old Apr 27, 2006, 7:19 AM   #29
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After reading all of your posts and seeing your amazing shots, I'm feeling really inferior right about now. When I was using my Minolta, people used to comment on how good my pictures where. Now I can't even get a decent photo of a stickin' bird on my feeder. I'm pathetic. I may as well be using a disposable for as bad as I am.
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Old Apr 27, 2006, 7:23 AM   #30
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Tullio wrote:
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Jim, if you look at the back of the squirrel, there is a very brightopen spot between the leaves, similar to the background of Sue's #1 shot. However, you see no purple fringing around the leaves. I can post dozen of photos taken with the H1 showing very high contrast with absolutely no purple fringing, unless you crop the heck out of it (see other examples below).
I've been doing this for a long time, and in the right conditions, they all do it (and the conditions were very ripe for it in the samples posted). It didn't take me but a couple of minutes to find similar fringing from an H1 on Pbase:

http://www.pbase.com/rengirl/image/57776201

When you have a difference in focus between foreground and background, it's more likely to occur, and virtually no digicam is immune to it.

You can also find lots of examples without it from the Canon. The only way to tell how much better one camera is compared to another is to take photos of the same subjects in the same conditions.

You may also have a defective camera. I've seen S2 IS owners with problem cameras that Canon calibrated.

You see QC problems from all manufacturers, and it's not uncommon to see optical misalignment and AF calibration issues (it probably occurs far more often than most people realize).

You can find great photos and poor photos from either camera. But, when someone gets a brand new camera and the first time they ask for help, someone suggests that they return it for a different model, that usually doesn't sit well with me.

Steve noticed fringing in both models, too. From the S2 IS review:

"I also noticed a slight amount of chromatic abberation (purple fringing on highlights) in high-contrast areas throughout the zoom and aperture ranges. "

From the H1 review:

"I also noticed a slight amount of chromatic abberation (purple fringing on highlights) in high-contrast areas throughout the zoom and aperture ranges."

With two models with image quality this similar, you're "splitting hairs". If you like your H1 that much better, great. But, I suspect a lot of it is subconcious because some of your first photos didn't turn out right from your Canon.

Steve noted that the H1 was better in some areas. But, it's not *that* much better (and an untrained eye probably wouldn't see the image quality differences at most viewing sizes).

So that visitors can understand the difference, Steve posted samples taken of the same subjects at the same time, not hand picked samples designed to put one camera in a better light.


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