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Old May 3, 2006, 2:15 AM   #1
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I just got a brand new G6, but the pictures taken seemed to always be blurry, unless a self timer and tripod were used.

Is it simply because my hands shake too much ?

On AUTO mode, the camera tries to automatically take indoor pictures with a really slow setting of 1/8s and F5.6 for some reason.

How can you change it to be a bit faster ?


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Old May 3, 2006, 12:19 PM   #2
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Tv mode should allow you to set to something faster than 1/8

P mode would also allow you to change other settings that could affect your shutter speed (ISO, exposure, etc..)






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Old May 6, 2006, 8:05 PM   #3
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I usually have it on P mode, but I let the camera set the ISO values automatically as I am not very familiar with ISO settings.

The asterisk button allows me to change settings on the fly, but unfortunately with handheld pictures, I still get blurring if I don't use the tripod.

I wish that in future, Canon would take a few pointers from Panasonic, and implement IS on all high end cameras.

The S3 IS and the SD700 IS have specifications that are not considered "high end"


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Old May 6, 2006, 9:14 PM   #4
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ELDDJOC wrote:
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On AUTO mode, the camera tries to automatically take indoor pictures with a really slow setting of 1/8s and F5.6 for some reason.
Are you sure it's trying to use f/5.6? That doesn't sound right. It should be keeping the aperture wide open indoors in low light unless you've got a setting messed up somewhere causing that behavior.




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Old May 7, 2006, 10:02 PM   #5
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I thought it was really weird as well ....

Here is a picture, 1/13s and F 2.0 On P Mode but ISO on AUTO


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Old May 7, 2006, 10:07 PM   #6
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Here is another picture, 1/13s and F 2.0 On P Mode but ISO on AUTO -

Difference is 2X Zoom applied to the same area.
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Old May 7, 2006, 10:17 PM   #7
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Well, 1/13 is a bit on the slow side for a hand held shot without any stabilization (or a tripod).

The "rule of thumb" for a hand held photo is that shutter speed should be the reciprocal of focal length.

IOW, if you're shooting at 50mm, you'd want 1/50 second or faster. If you're shooting zoomed into 100mm, you'd want 1/100 second or faster, etc. But, lighting may not cooperate. ;-)

So, don't zoom in any more than you need to. For one thing, blur from camera shake is magnified as focal lengths get longer. Also, most lenses are not as bright as you zoom in more.

The lens on the G6 is one of the brightest around now in a non-DSLR model. It's f/2 on it's wide end, only stopping down to f/2.6 on it's long end.

So, it's similar to your Sony DSC-F717 for lens brightness (although the Sony has it beat at the same focal lengths when you start zooming in with either one).

Providing you shoot at wide open apertures (and just use Av mode if Auto doesn't do it), if you're getting more blurry shots from the G6 versus the Sony, it's probably because you're holding the Sony steadier in low light due to differences in weight and ergonomics.

With shutter speeds that slow, extra care is needed to increase your number of keepers (smoothly squeezing the shutter button and not releasing it until after you hear it take the photo). Finding something to brace yourself against can help.

You can increase ISO speed to help out, too. Chances are, Auto ISO isn't going to go over about ISO 200. Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture.

The downside is higher noise levels. But, tools like Neat Image, Noiseware or Noise Ninja can be used to help reduce the appearance of noise when higher ISO speeds are needed.

Of course, there is always the flash.
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Old May 8, 2006, 2:04 AM   #8
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The funny thing is that the camera pretty much chose all those settings for me, so I guess I will try tweaking the ISO and shutter settings.

Strangely, the F717 has no IS, but on AUTO mode, I have no problems with blur ?

And what does Full Stops mean ?




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Old May 8, 2006, 2:42 AM   #9
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In auto mode, it should already be using wide open apertures (smaller f/stop numbers).

If it's not, just use Aperture Priority and select the smallest f/stop number (which is the largest aperture). Then, the camera will pick the appropriate shutter speed for proper exposure. If it's not fast enough, increase your ISO speed.

As for a stop, here is a site explaining it:

http://www.earthboundlight.com/photo...tops-here.html

Here is an exposure calculator that can also help you understand it. Note that film speed in the calculator is the same thing as ISO speed, and the same principles apply to digital for exposure purposes.

http://www.robert-barrett.com/photo/...alculator.html

With each one stop move to a smaller aperture (represented by higher f/stop numbers), you will need shutter speeds twice as long for proper exposure for any given lighting condition and ISO speed.

That's one reason I mention how bright the lenses are on your DSC-F717 and G6.

f/2 (where the lens on your G6 and DSC-F717 start out at with their apertures set to wide open) is twice as bright as f/2.8 (which is where most other zoom lenses start out). That's a one stop difference. So, your cameras have much brighter lenses than are typically found in most cameras.




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