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Old May 9, 2006, 10:06 AM   #11
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Tullio wrote:
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There are differences in camera settings. In this last shot, the metering mode was set to Center Weight rather than Matrix. I prefer this setting for I think the camera tends to produce better exposed pictures, specially if you happen to have very bright areas surrounding your subject. The focal length is also different and the camera was not in Av mode.

Is this something I would have had to change or would the camera do it automatically in "P" mode. I am sure I did not change any setting as both photos were taken seconds apart from one another.
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Old May 9, 2006, 12:54 PM   #12
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You change the metering mode manually by simply pushing the "Jump" button at the back. Because you don't have to go through the menu, it's very easy to accidentally press that button andchange the mode.I always have the Display set to everything so I canmonitor my camera settings at all timesjust in case I do something like this.
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Old May 12, 2006, 12:13 AM   #13
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I took the camera out today to attempt some of the suggestions in this thead and realized I had hit the metering button. Generally, what is the best metering mode to use?

This photo, for example, seems to have soft focus to the left. How would I get all things in focus.

It was taken on P setting, Vivid from maybe 7 feet away.


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Old May 12, 2006, 12:18 AM   #14
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I suggest that use "AV" in the most condition.
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Old May 12, 2006, 12:21 AM   #15
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What is the primary difference between P and AV? Bear in mind that I am very new to digital photography and manual scratches the surface to what I want to know.

I have been using the P setting with Vivid to varying results.
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Old May 12, 2006, 12:30 AM   #16
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MrGarmonbozia wrote:
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What is the primary difference between P and AV? Bear in mind that I am very new to digital photography and manual scratches the surface to what I want to know.

I have been using the P setting with Vivid to varying results.
sorry, my poor English isnot enough to say this problem professionally....read your user guide totally, and use google properly~
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Old May 12, 2006, 12:31 AM   #17
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By the way, I like the kitten very much!
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Old May 12, 2006, 1:31 AM   #18
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You're seeing a shallow depth of field.

What sunnyplanet wants to explain is that Av mode (aperture priority) allows you to control depth of field by setting the aperture (f/stop).

Depth of Field is how much of the scene is in focus as you get further away from your focus point.

If you choose a smaller aperture (higher f/stop number) you will have more depth of field (more of a scene in focus as you get further away from your focus point). Be careful in low light changing aperture, as your camera will require slower shuttter speeds for any given lighting condition and ISO speed when you use smaller apertures (higher f/stop numbers).

If you choose a larger aperture (smaller f/stop number) you will have less depth of field (less of a scene in focus as you get further away from your focus point). This is useful to help subjects stand out from distracting backgrounds (so that your subject is in focus and the background is blurry). This will also allow the camera to use faster shutter speeds for any given lighting and ISO speed.

Note that the closer you are to your subject, the shallower the depth of field. So, aperture is more important for photos like these (since you are focusing from a very close distance).

Here is an online depth of field calculator that may help you to understand it:

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

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Old May 12, 2006, 1:58 AM   #19
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Thanks, JimC! Still not going to bed? what time now in Georgia? Deep night?
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Old May 12, 2006, 2:10 AM   #20
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Yes, it's 2:09AM here now. Very late for me. I should go to sleep. My wife went to bed hours ago. :-)
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