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Old May 7, 2006, 7:23 PM   #1
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So, an update from my last thread "What am I doing wrong" which was about indoor focus issues with the S2. One of the suggestions was to place the setting to "P" and then use Vivid. This has worked wonders and my photos are looking stunning for the most part. However, I am still having issues with focus at times in bright sun. I again don't feel this is the fault of the camera but something I am not doing correctly.

I have uploaded a bunch of photos I find have soft focus on them. The settings for these were:

"P" / VIVID / ISO: 50 / White Balance: AUTO

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

Seeing as how I reached my upload limit there I will post a few more in this thead.
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Old May 7, 2006, 7:32 PM   #2
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Another one here:
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Old May 7, 2006, 7:41 PM   #3
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Last one:
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Old May 8, 2006, 1:53 AM   #4
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Here's my 2c:

The cats shot you use Av and your shutter speed is 1/30 (too lowfor 72.0mm (full zoom). Did you have IS turned on? It helps but in extreme cases, it will not prevent picture blur caused bycamera shake.You should have used higher shutter speed (at least 1/250) or increase the ISO to 100 or perhapseven 200. See the same image sharpened with Picasa.
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Old May 8, 2006, 1:59 AM   #5
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From what I can see in EXIF info from the cat image. It was taken at maximum zoom at 1/30th of a second - which is too slow - so camera shake is a likely problem.

At maximum zoom, a safe shutter speed is about 1/400 sec, and with IS you might push this toward 1/100, possibly even 1/30, but you will need a very steady hand - the IS only corrects minor shake.

If you get closer and use less zoom the shutter speed requirement will be lower. The general rule is the shutter speed should be 1/zoom seconds. Where zoom is 35mm equivalent zoom. For example, if your S2 is zoomed half way, that's about 200mm in 35mm terms, so with no IS you should be looking for 1/200 second exposure. With IS, you might be safe with 1/50 or you might take a chance and risk something lower.

But if the subject is moving, then you need a high shutter speed to freeze the motion and avoid subject motion blur. So the IS isn't much help if the shutter speed is low and subject is moving. In the case of the cats, subject movement may be a problem, so I'd aim for 1/500 sec, or perhaps take a risk with something as low as 1/100.

In the case of the flowers, the shutter speed, 1/800 sec, is plenty fast enough. It looks like either the S2 or you picked something in the backgound to focus on - which leaves some of the foreground out of focus. Bit hard to tell with such as small image. Once thing that might help is to close down the aperture moving to a slower shutter speed, say 1/200, or 1/100, and then the depth of field will be greater - which means more in front and behind the focus point will be in reasonable focus.

If this needs more explanation - this Canon DSLR online book walks through a lot of this stuff in an introductory manner and pretty much applies to the S2 as well:

http://web.canon.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/index.html



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Old May 8, 2006, 2:09 AM   #6
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As for theflower photo, did you check the histogram after the picture was taken to see if it indicated over exposure?What is the AF modeset atin the Menu? I noticed you are using zoom, is the IS turned on? If so, in which mode? You should have it on Shooting for it is the most efficient way. See the same image sharpened with Picasa.
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Old May 8, 2006, 2:49 PM   #7
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When I checked the EXIF data on the flower picture it showed the focal length at 6mm. Unless you were using Macro mode, do you think that perhaps you were closer to the flower than 18 inches (the S2 manual shows the shooting distance to be from 18 inches to infinity at wide angle)? This has happened to me several times and may explain why the leaves were in focus but not the flower.

I was happy when I upgraded from the S1 to the S2 with its Macro and Super Macro modes. However the S1 would let me quickly focus from 3.9 inches to infinity and I got used to that.Now I have toremember to choose the right mode with shooting closeups or I may end up with out of focus issues.


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Old May 8, 2006, 10:13 PM   #8
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Tullio wrote:
Quote:
As for theflower photo, did you check the histogram after the picture was taken to see if it indicated over exposure?What is the AF modeset atin the Menu? I noticed you are using zoom, is the IS turned on? If so, in which mode? You should have it on Shooting for it is the most efficient way. See the same image sharpened with Picasa.

1. The histogram should no exposure issues,

2. AF Mode: Single

3. IS Mode: Shoot Only

Thanks for pointing me a Picasa. I downloaded and applied to some photos. The results are much better.

In contrast to the above photos, though, let me provide you of a similar one taken only moments later of the same subject (the orange cat pictured in my first link) which I think is fine. Nothing changed in my camera setting yet this shot turned out sharper. A tad confusing, if you ask this newb.
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Old May 9, 2006, 12:36 AM   #9
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There are differences in camera settings. In this last shot, the metering mode was set to Center Weight rather than Matrix. I prefer this setting for I think the camera tends to produce better exposed pictures, specially if you happen to have very bright areas surrounding your subject. The focal length is also different and the camera was not in Av mode.
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Old May 9, 2006, 5:59 AM   #10
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You seem to have used less zoom. The shutter speed is much higher (1/160 sec). If you use less zoom, the camera will receive more light, and it will choose a higher shutter speed. 1/160 is a resonable speed for a slow moving subject, bit slow, but OK. So for this image both shake and subject-motion will be less of an issue.

It's also possible the cat is now in better lit location. A slight difference in the amount of available light is not at all obvious to us because our eyesight/brain compensates quite well within a reasonable range of conditions - cameras aren't nearly as good.

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In contrast to the above photos, though, let me provide you of a similar one taken only moments later of the same subject (the orange cat pictured in my first link) which I think is fine. Nothing changed in my camera setting yet this shot turned out sharper. A tad confusing, if you ask this newb.
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