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Old Jun 5, 2006, 7:23 PM   #11
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I've found that, while playing with the ISO settings, I can get really nice pictures from this camera. The ISO button is the most use button for me. For now, since I'm still learning the ins and outs of this camera, I try to get each shot in a couple different ISOs so I can compare them later and learn from my results.



So far, I've gotten some pretty impressive pics. :G
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Old Jun 6, 2006, 1:57 AM   #12
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If there is enough light for it, try using the lowest ISO with Av (Aperture priority mode) and AEB (Auto Expose Bracketing). It's easier than it sounds! The slowest ISO that works will be the least noisy. The AEB will simplify testing by taking 3 separate shots: 1at it's calculated exposure, 1 with alittle less, and 1 with a little more -- all using your manually-selected 'f stop'.

Have fun with your S3. I enjoy my S2!

DebiWonders wrote:
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I've found that, while playing with the ISO settings, I can get really nice pictures from this camera. The ISO button is the most use button for me. For now, since I'm still learning the ins and outs of this camera, I try to get each shot in a couple different ISOs so I can compare them later and learn from my results.



So far, I've gotten some pretty impressive pics. :G
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Old Jun 6, 2006, 4:40 AM   #13
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Good point - switching from Auto to P(program) mode and using the ISO button would be a simple way forward. Then you'd mainly have to keep an eye on the shutter speed making sure it's reasonable for the amount of zoom and shifting up to a higher ISO if not. On my S2, which lacks an ISO-button, I've set the short-cut button to ISO - so I'd agree controlling the ISO is very important for good results.

But if mclendenen1701 really wants a camera that can almost always be left on Auto - then I'm not sure the is it.

DebiWonders wrote:
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I've found that, while playing with the ISO settings, I can get really nice pictures from this camera. The ISO button is the most use button for me. For now, since I'm still learning the ins and outs of this camera, I try to get each shot in a couple different ISOs so I can compare them later and learn from my results.



So far, I've gotten some pretty impressive pics. :G
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Old Jun 6, 2006, 6:29 AM   #14
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Thank you all for the replies and info. Yes, I've been debating with Canon about the feature set of the S3 IS. I used to own a Canon Pro 90IS (10x zoom) and thought the S3IS would be as good if not better (in AUTO mode). Everyone has been telling me to get a DSLR, but I like to take video as well. I can do good video with the S3 IS, but it looks like the camera side will have to be handled as if it were a DSLR!

Has anyone worked with the Macro and Super Macro modes of the S3 IS? I am having difficulty with the focusing in macro mode regardless of whatever other mode I am in. This is my fifth digital camera and I've taken over 40,000 images in the last 8 years, but you'd think I've never USED a digital camera with all the problems I am having with the S3IS. <sigh>

Mike
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Old Jun 6, 2006, 1:58 PM   #15
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To use the super macro mode the camera has to be at the wide end of the zoom range, otherwise it won't work.
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Old Jun 7, 2006, 6:32 AM   #16
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I'm just starting to learn the DLR lingo, so I am assuming the "wide end" of the zoom means when I have it zoomed out all the way (12x)? I also read in the manual that if you have digital zoom enabled, you cannot move into the digital zoom area (beyond 12x) and still use Super Macro. However, how does one use the wide end of the zoom but still be able to get as close as 0 inches from the subject as the manual suggests? In addition, I have had very little luck even with the standard Macro mode, regardless of the mode setting, even in bright sunlight. I personally think this camera has some problems with either it's software or hardware, but I doubt Canon will ever admit they made a camera that does not work like it should.


Sorry to sound so frustrated. I've owned 5 different digital cameras and have taken over 40,000 pictures in the last 8 years, and I have NEVER had so many problems trying to get a camera to do what it is suppose to be able to do.

Sometimes, maybe change is NOT good!

Mike
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Old Jun 7, 2006, 7:26 AM   #17
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When I've used the super macro mode, I have to physically BE 0mm (or around that) from the subject. The zoom goes all the way out (not 12x...the other way). The supermacro DOES take nice shots but it does NOT function the way the regular macro does. In the regular macro mode, you CAN zoom into a subject without physically moving.

I, too, have just started to break in this camera. I went from a G1 to this one. It is a MAJOR change for me too. My biggest battle has been deciding which ISO to use but I'm trying to educate myself a little more about it and I am getting better shots because of it. Word of advice......DON'T use AUTO HI ISO or the 800 setting. EVERY shot I've taken like that is REALLY noisy. I've actually had a lot of luck around 200.

I'm not sure that this is a "bad" camera. I just think it takes some learning. Like a lot of good computer programs, you'll think they are crap until you figure them out. I'm thinking I'm getting kind of close to figuring out this camera. Hopefully, you will too!
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Old Jun 7, 2006, 1:55 PM   #18
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the wide end of the zoom is the smallest number, in s3's case it's the 6 mm (or 36mm equivalent).

i suspect that your digital zoom is on while taking pictures, i suggest that you set it to off and just crop it later and you will see a big difference with the results you're trying to get. and don't use the auto mode, my best solution for this is go to P mode and set your iso to either auto,80,100 or 200. do not set it higher than 200 or in the "high iso setting".

P mode is basically like an auto mode.

try it and let us know how it works out.

every camera has it's weaknesses.

i had my s3 for 3 weeks now and enjoying it so far, but not without trial and errors, and knowing the limits of the camera. the good thing about digital is that, if your photos don't show up as you would like it to. is you did not spend money on film and developing.

hope this helps
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Old Jun 7, 2006, 2:58 PM   #19
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Wide end of zoom = wide angle, like wide-screen.
Tele end of zoom = telephoto (telescope), think narrow angle.

This old thread on macro may help a bit (and there are other macro discussions in this forum).
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...462459#p462459

The info is spread through the postings in the thread, so read right through.

It's not possible to build a compact zoom leans that can do macro through its entire zoom range, so super-macro only works at the wide-end and normal-macro only works at a limited zoom range at the wide-end (as indicated by the yellow zone in the viewfinder). Othre super zooms don't have super-macro, they can't macro as close as 0cm, but they have a normal macro that has a wider zoom range than S3/S2 normal-macro (but still restricted).

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Old Jun 7, 2006, 3:19 PM   #20
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I should add...

Using normal macro is easier if you first set how much zoom you want (within the limited range). After that don't change the zoom - that way you get the issues of min/max focus distance out of the way first.

Also when using a macro expansion lens, Canon's or other brands, it is often easier to
fix the focus at some approximate value by holding down the shutter button. Then, while looking at the viewfinder, move the whole camera slightly backward and forward to obtain a more exact focus and depth of field. This technique might help when using normal-macro as well.

Finally, it helps to have more light - this allows smaller apertures, which makes for a wider depth of field (DOF min/max acceptable focus distance). Remember, aperture is a ratio, so f/8 is smaller than f/3.2 (focal-length divided by 3.2 - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aperture ). Sunlight can be harsh, so using the flash with a diffuser to soften the light can help - basically some white paper between the flash and the target will do (see http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=15 for more on this kind oif thing)
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