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Old Jul 10, 2006, 10:06 PM   #1
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I recently purchased the Canon A620 and it's a little complicated for me. I have been reading the manual but need a little help. I have been taking many pictures just trying to play with it and figure it out. I have it set to fine compression, iso on auto, and large for the mega pixels(?). I have noticed the majority of my pictures are coming out blurry, especially the fast moving ones like when my son is playing baseball. I have tried many settings including kids/pets for moving objects. Is there something I'm missing or am I setting it wrong. Also the ones that aren't so blurry seem to have a "haze" like look to them. I noticed this also on my Fuji finepix too. I need to figure this out before vacation on July 22nd. Thanks so much. Wendy


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 7:44 PM   #2
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Hi Wendy

Most point and shoot cameras will come out with blurry pics of fast-moving objects. You may have better success by setting the ISO to 200 or even 400, although the pictures will get pretty noisy. If still objects are coming out blurry - even with the flash on - then your hands are moving a tiny bit, probably when pressing the shutter release button. The best advice I can give for that is to not hold your arms out and look at the LCD as you snap the picture - there's a greater propensity for your hands to shake when you do that. Try to hold your arms in against your body as much as possible when taking the picture. Also, try setting the camera or leaning the camera on something stable.

Remember, too, to press the shutter-release button down halfway briefly before snapping the shot - it helps the camera focus on the scene.

I have an A620 and enjoy it very much, while remaining aware of its limitations.
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Old Jul 12, 2006, 1:23 PM   #3
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I've seen posts like this on other forums. One person explained that the "Auto" mode tries to use too low of an ISO, so, as you mentioned, it's better to use the Program mode where you can set a higher ISO.

Wendy, I recomend that you go ahead and not be afraid to learn about at least a couple of the settings and get comfortable using the P "Program" mode, and I'm sure you'll get at least some great shots. Particular with the helpful advice from peopel on forums like this...

I've been using digital cameras for years, and was never shy about using/learning about "Advanced" features. But I still find the performance of the A620 on the Auto setting surprisingly dissapointing. It got great reviews, but perhaps none of the reviewers could really see using this camera from a novice's perspective?

I haven't had mine for very long, but I've been playing with (using) it for a while trying to get the hang of which settings to use in the Program mode, but I find this camera's performance still to be lacking. The camera I had been using for the past few years (until the lens stuck) is the Olympus C-5050. I figured after all these years that sensor technology must have improved a lot and that with this A620 I'd be able to have LESS blurry pictures rather than more of them.

Ok, sorry I'm getting a little off topic in your thread Wendy...

F.G. - do you find that you're able to get good results indoors without flash? And for taking pictures like Wendy would like to, outdoors, moving children, etc. How about ISO 200. And, would it be better to use less zoom (for a lower apeture, letting in more light) and crop the photo, or would it be better to go ahead and use the zoom?

What about setting the resolution lower, will that reduce noise by averaging pixels on the sensor? If we mostly are going to be printing 4 x 6 photos, than 7 MP is way more than nesc., no?

I was considering returning my A620 as I was so dissapointed about how not "bright" the lens is, but I find that it's GREAT for taking little movies, particularly with the price of 2GB SD cards under $70 these days.
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Old Jul 15, 2006, 9:39 PM   #4
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critofur, I'm sorry I am replying so late - I just saw your question...

I can get decent indoor non-flash shots when the ambient lighting is pretty good. ISO 100 usually suffices, sometimes 200 is necessary, though a bit noisy. Action shots are pretty rough, though. In true low-light situations - like, say, evening - I need the flash to take action shots. Even to take a a photo where the subject is not moving when there is not an abundance of light often requires me to prop the camera against something solid to minimize any movement on my part. I do so whenever possible.

7 mp is way more than enough for 4x6 prints. I don't think switching to a lower resolution on the camera would clean up noise, though. I think - and someone please correct me if I am wrong - the sensor is still capturing the same data whether you are using the highest or lowest quality modes. It's post-capture where the camera adjusts the size and resolution.

Attached is a pic taken this evening, with light provided by a lamp with a 60w bulb to the left and slightly behind the subject, and also from a 27" TV about 10 ft away. Camera was 3 ft away and I was using approximately a 2x zoom. The lighting in the photo is reflective of how it actually was in the room at that time.

ISO100, F3.5, Exp. 0.5"


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Old Jul 15, 2006, 9:41 PM   #5
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And here's a similar pic, taken a few seconds later with the same settings except with an exposure time of 2"

I should also mention that, when the light is dim, I usually have to take 3 or 4 photos in rapid succession, as the number of blurry photos is greater than when there is plenty of light. And, of course, on occasion the A620 simply refuses to focus on the subject. I'm still learning how to adjust for these things, since I'm such a skill-less noob yet.
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Old Jul 22, 2006, 5:37 PM   #6
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Heres the stupid question of the day. I also recently grabbed a Canon A620 amd love it. My question is, I have noticed while zooming in or out and looking thru th LCD screen at the same time the image you are pointing at becomes blurry as hell. Then after you have finaly decided on a focal lenth to shoot it at, it takes a split second to sharpen back up. Is this normal? I can't remember if my previous canons did this or not. Also I got 72 pics out of my new Kingston Elite Pro 1 gig card before it died, maybe a cam issue?
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