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Old Aug 31, 2007, 12:50 PM   #1
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Hello all,

I've found out about this model but I can't find his release date.

This issue is important to me because I need its high speed feature for my work project.

If you can post any information related it would be very grateful.



Thanks in advance,

Sharon.
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Old Aug 31, 2007, 12:58 PM   #2
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It's only a prototype, so they haven't announced a release date (or even a model name that I'm aware of).

http://www.casio.com/news/content/2B...-67B371510603/

Chances are, it's based on this new Sony sensor (it's a .pdf file, so Acrobat Reader or equivalent will be needed to see it):

http://www.sony.net/Products/SC-HP/c.../imx017cqe.pdf

Sony is the largest provider of the sensors used in Digital Cameras. So, I'd look for more cameras like the one Casio is working on to be announced in the future, from more than one camera manufacturer (probably from Nikon, Sony, Pentax and others).

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Old Aug 31, 2007, 1:13 PM   #3
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thank you for the quick answer.

BTW: do you know about any other high-speed cameras that are available this days(not professionals high-speed camera but ones that can give me as much similar abilities as do the casio).



Sharon.
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Old Aug 31, 2007, 1:19 PM   #4
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This is a brand new sensor, and it incorporates technology that existing sensors don't have. There are no cameras using it yet (other than models that haven't been announced yet).

But, some of the existing cameras have relatively fast frame rates (although not that fast), depending on the image size produced.

What do you need to accomplish? IOW, be as specific as possible on exactly what your work project entails, and what you need the high shooting speed for (still images, movies, etc.).

But, keep in mind that just because a camera has the ability to use a faster frame rate, doesn't mean that you can in the conditions you need to use one in (because the camera has to allow enough exposure time for each frame for the lighting you're using it in).


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Old Aug 31, 2007, 1:33 PM   #5
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I need to capture and tomake a basic analyze to a car crash scene.

do you know of any high speed camera / camcorder out there that can give me fast capturing / filming abilities?



Thanks,

Sharon.
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Old Aug 31, 2007, 1:52 PM   #6
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Sharon, I know very little about camcorders. If video is your primary objective, you may be better off looking at products designed specifically for that purpose (and our site really isn't geared towards that market).

As a general rule, a video camera takes poor still photos, and a still camera takes poor videos. So, when you try to get the best of both in one camera, one or the other area is compromised.

But, the line between still and video cameras is becoming very blurred, and will probably continue to do so in the future (thanks to advances in sensor technology like you see with the new Sony sensor that Casio is apparently using with this prototype.

Depending on budget, I'd probably look at one of the higher end Sony or Canon Video cameras if you need high quality video of crashes (and the pro cameras don't come cheap).

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/catego...s_Cameras.html

Sorry, but this is not my area of expertise, and I'm not sure where to tell you to look if high quality video is your primary objective.

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Old Aug 31, 2007, 2:10 PM   #7
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P.S.

And again, just because a camera has the ability to use faster frame rates, doesn't mean that you can use them if lighting doesn't permit.

What you'll tend to get with most still cameras designed to take video is very grainy images in less than optimum lighting (i.e., indoor crash scenes, if I understand what you're trying to do), depending on the viewing size needed. That's because the camera is trying to amplify the signal from the sensor to allow for a faster frame rate (because it needs to keep the shutter open long enough for proper exposure of each frame), and in less than optimum lighting, the only option it has is to amplify an already weak signal to make it bright enough as your speed (frames per second) increases.

That tends to act like trying to turn up the volume on a weak radio station. But, instead of static and hiss, you get image noise.

You'll probably want a higher end video camera with a sensor and lens designed for optimum video from the sound of your project (i.e, crash tests would probably warrant equipment designed for the best possible quality).


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Old Aug 31, 2007, 2:26 PM   #8
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One more P.S.

If you are after the best frame rate in less than optimum lighting for still (versus video) images, I'd look at the new Nikon D3.

It's not out yet. But, it will be available before the end of the year (it should start hitting dealer shelves in November). It will do around 9 frames per second with higher than average ISO speeds (how sensitive the sensor is to light). It will sell for approximately $4,999 (which is a bargain as those things go, considering what it's capable of).

It will not shoot video (still photos only), and you'll still want a very bright lens to go with it in less than optimum lighting to maintain those kinds of frame rates (because the shutter must stay open long enough for proper exposure).

http://www.steves-digicams.com/diginews.html#d3

http://press.nikonusa.com/2007/08/ei...anging_pro.php

If you need outdoor versus indoor photos, then you've got more options. Most crash tests I've seen on television were indoors. Is that the case with your project?

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Old Aug 31, 2007, 3:24 PM   #9
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Thanks.

i'll review the site.

again, thanks.



Sharon.
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Old Sep 10, 2007, 7:48 PM   #10
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I did a video interview with a representative of Casio at IFA 2007 last week, you can see the video in HD quality here: http://techvideoblog.com/ifa/casio/
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