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Old Jun 6, 2010, 5:51 PM   #1
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Default Why is picture quality so different between Casio EX FH25 and EX FH100?

With the same sensor and the same processor, I expected the IQ to be very similar for these two cameras. The "lightening" process, whereby two or more pictures are combined in camera to produce a better low light picture, seems quite different: see the night street picture with church steeple. I know that the larger lens of the FH25 is better quality, but that does not explain the higher noise levels of the FH100 vs the FH25. What gives?
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 10:39 AM   #2
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Different camera settings. One was at ISO 100, the other was at ISO 800. ;-)

Look at the image EXIF using a tool capable of reading it and you can see there was a big difference in the camera settings being used.

Here's one you can use:

http://www.photome.com
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Old Jun 15, 2010, 1:45 AM   #3
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Thanks. I had somehow assumed that the settings were always the same for the same subject. No excuse for not looking at EXIF data-no special program needed. Right click anywhere on the picture, click on "properties" in the menu, and the EXIF data is there, at least in the generic Windows Picture Viewer, default for jpeg.

This means that I can use the less expensive EX FH100 for the industrial high speed video that I need and still have a pocketable camera for other uses. Nice.
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Old Oct 2, 2010, 9:56 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Different camera settings. One was at ISO 100, the other was at ISO 800. ;-)

Look at the image EXIF using a tool capable of reading it and you can see there was a big difference in the camera settings being used.

Here's one you can use:

http://www.photome.com
Jim,
I use photome quite a bit and have noticed that sometimes the program will show the lens used and at other times it does not.
Do you know why that may be?
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Old Oct 3, 2010, 7:54 PM   #5
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That info is stored in the proprietary maker notes section of the metadata, and some programs do a better job of interpreting the tags compared to others.

Basically, a numerical lens ID is stored (reported by the lens), and the reader has to try and determine the lens model associated with it and give you a description (manufacturer/model) for that ID. To make matters more complex, more than one lens can have the same ID.
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