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Old Aug 21, 2005, 11:16 AM   #11
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Yeah, unfortunately Casio Cameras don't have an adjustable file write speed, so when a high speed card is used it can cause some problems. Though as I first stated I've seen cameras work just fine with these cards, but I wouldn't suggest continous use.

As far as the "leakage" goes you'll see three light spaces at the bottom of the LCD screen. That is the backlight for the LCD. You have a option in the SETUP tab that allows either normal or bright for the screen setting. It's less noticable when you have the camera screen set for BRIGHT.

As far as the "halo" I'm still trying to recreate that and see when it comes in. On other cameras some lighting has caused blue tints or faded light areas. I'll get back with you all when more comes available about the "halo".
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Old Aug 25, 2005, 2:40 PM   #12
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Specter wrote:
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The "standard" SD card writes at 2MegaBytes/s. Not, 2Megabit/s. There's a difference, there are 8 bits in every byte, so it's really writing at 8Megabits/s. According to the Z750 manual the HQ quality video does work at 4Mb/s --4 Megabits/s; Which is twice what is needed.

High speed memory cards fail much sooner than standard memory cards, and a malfunctioning memory card can cause some very very weird errors, including a Lens Error. In my own experience, a card error can even completely lock up the camera.
You are right – I was using Mb instead of MB.

I got that number from someone who tested several different cards in his Z750. I should have run my own tests rather than believe someone else's. Quite often a device requires higher performance than the input specs would suggest, but that shouldn't apply to memory cards. If the camera is only sending the data to the card at 4Mb/sec then that is all it should need for write speed.

I have what I think is a standard Sandisk 256Mb SD card in my Palm Tungsten, so I tried it in the Z750. It takes movies without anything flashing in the LCD as the manual says it does when it skips frames. The card is a couple of years old and I have no way of checking the specs, but assuming it is a standard card the movies work fine with it.

I timed 10 continuous mode shots at best quality and the high speed card was 8 seconds faster. It was also busier longer before it would shut down with the standard card. I ran the tests several times with the same scene and got the same numbers for each card on all the tests. So there are some performance differences between the standard and high speed cards.

I am curious about your math. With 8 bits per byte, why would a 2MB/sec card be 8Mb/sec rather than 16Mb/sec?

After 5 digital cameras and 8 cards I have yet to have a problem. I usually get the fastest card available and currently have high speed cards in my Z750 and FZ10. I buy only quality brand cards – that might make a difference. For an extra 10 bucks it wasn't worth taking a chance of something running slower.

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Old Aug 25, 2005, 9:23 PM   #13
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I've read here about the faster cards wearing out sooner (read/write erros begin to occur). I'm sure you're aware that the number of read/write cycles (yes it's quiet high) is not unlimited. They do wear out.

Do you have an data on this or is it something that should not be a consideration?

Your thoughts?
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Old Aug 26, 2005, 1:38 AM   #14
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EDD wrote:
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I've read here about the faster cards wearing out sooner (read/write erros begin to occur). I'm sure you're aware that the number of read/write cycles (yes it's quiet high) is not unlimited. They do wear out.

Do you have an data on this or is it something that should not be a consideration?

Your thoughts?
Not sure who the question was for, but I'll give you my take.

Flash memory life can be a factor when you use it to replace a hard drive. Evidently some systems aren't very efficient at spreading the work around and some sectors get used constantly.

But I don't think it is much of a factor in digital cameras. I notice that Transcend is advertising 10,000 insertion cycles for their 80X 1Gig SD cards. Write and erase cycles are in the hundred thousand range for most SD cards I've seen numbers on. I doubt anyone is likely to wear one out in a camera even if the insertions and cycles are overstated.

From what I've seen the rated cycles aren't any lower for the faster cards. Both Transcend and Sandisk have industrial grade 1GB SD cards rated at 2 million cycles and they are high speed.

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Old Aug 27, 2005, 6:27 AM   #15
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Hi there!

The focus problem has nothing to do with the speed of the memory card (I am using a SanDisk Extreme III 1GB). It is purely a mechanical problem thatcan happen when the lens gets blocked on power up. Luckily it can be fixed easily!

This is howI fixed it a couple of time already:

Power the camera on (Do NOT block the lens!), Switch to tele lens mode, then rotate the inner, bigger lens ring counter clockwise (you will need a little bit of force). Turn the camera off again. Done!

Hope this helps!

Stephan
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Old Aug 28, 2005, 2:45 AM   #16
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Immi wrote:
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This is howI fixed it a couple of time already:

Power the camera on (Do NOT block the lens!), Switch to tele lens mode, then rotate the inner, bigger lens ring counter clockwise (you will need a little bit of force). Turn the camera off again. Done
Hello,
if that works, a Z750 would be mine. Does this help permanently, until I'm blocking the lens with something again? Or only for a few On/Off switch cycles?

Great advice!
greets
redbit
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Old Aug 28, 2005, 3:46 AM   #17
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Quote:
Immi wrote:
Quote:
This is howI fixed it a couple of time already:

Power the camera on (Do NOT block the lens!), Switch to tele lens mode, then rotate the inner, bigger lens ring counter clockwise (you will need a little bit of force). Turn the camera off again. Done

I don't think it is a good idea for anyone to "force a lens" or "turn the lens ring" unless it is recommended by a official Casio Support or clearly documented in the manual. I've been using cameras for 20 years, although I'm not a professional, I know that lens is the most delicated part of a camera. So you have over 50% of chance breaking it. Why don't you return to Casio for repair? It is 100% risk free.
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Old Aug 28, 2005, 10:30 AM   #18
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ahdummy wrote:
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I don't think it is a good idea for anyone to "force a lens" or "turn the lens ring" unless it is recommended by a official Casio Support or clearly documented in the manual. I've been using cameras for 20 years, although I'm not a professional, I know that lens is the most delicated part of a camera. So you have over 50% of chance breaking it. Why don't you return to Casio for repair? It is 100% risk free.

Hi ahdummy!

I agree with you that this is not something you should do on a daily basis.... ;-)

On the other hand sending the camera back for repair costs time and money, and you won't have the camera for a while.

I had the lens problem in the middle of my holidays, so sending the camera was certainly not an option. I rather took the risk of breaking something broken even more than not beeing able to take any pictures at all... So I just gave it a try and it worked.

Stephan






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Old Aug 28, 2005, 10:36 AM   #19
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redbit wrote:
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Hello,
if that works, a Z750 would be mine. Does this help permanently, until I'm blocking the lens with something again? Or only for a few On/Off switch cycles?

Great advice!
greets
redbit
Hi redbit!

Itis a permanent fix until you block the lens again. I had todo it2 times already (It happended when I accidentally pressed the power on switch when I tried to pull the camera out of my jeans pocket, and there was that dreaded click-click sound of a blocked lens :evil.

Stephan
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Old Aug 28, 2005, 12:08 PM   #20
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Immi I'll store your method away for the day I screw up and block the lens.

Have you considered carrying the camera with the mode dial in the audio record mode? It is a little bit of a hassle to have to switch it back to snapshot, but it could save you some problems. Many people develop other problems like soft corners and edges after a lens error. Others find they can't focus when they turn the camera on until they move the zoom.

One small advantage to carrying it in the audio record mode is that I find myself a lot more likely to grab the camera rather than look for a pen and paper if I have to note something like an address or phone number.

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