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Old Aug 7, 2005, 9:36 AM   #1
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I'd love to get to the bottom of this "lens error" problem with the Z750. Basically, my question is (and it would be very important to know for all potential buyers) : Is this caused by some defect in the camera itself? Or is it caused purely by human error? I have been comparing the Z750 with the Canon SD500 and need to make a decision before I hand over $400+ for a camera. The Z750 is $100 cheaper than the SD500, but notI won't care about the extra $$$ if there is a lens problem with the Casio. The last thing anyone wants to do is buy a camera only to later discover that there is some mechanical or other defect and then have to return it or send it for repairs. :angry: Thanks for your feedback.
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Old Aug 7, 2005, 10:21 AM   #2
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i picked mine up at circuit city for 360 usd and i love it and not having that problem but i do get blurry pics but i think it is the user not the camera , the lens sound louder than my older camera but the lcd is much nicer i just wish i could take crisper pics , i know this doesnt answer your question about the lens but i havent had that problem i think some have but it could be they hit it or blocked it with there fingers
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Old Aug 7, 2005, 11:06 AM   #3
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My own experience with the Z750 has been that you will see the lens error eventually. I'm on my second 750 right now, having sent the first one back to dell for replacement, due to the upper right focus being soft. I left my finger in the way a couple of times when powering up, and I did get the lens error. If the obstruction tends to be only at the edge of the lens, it will turn the lens a little sideways when it trys to extend, and cause it to bind. Then when you power off it doesn't go back in. I just gently pulled out on the lens while powering the camera up and it will continue to extend and retract fine until you put your finger in the way again (it doesn't always stick, and mine only did twice)

The new camera... right out of the box when I turned it on the lens didn't fully extend and I got the lens error! I almost fell over. I gave it a little wiggle,felt it pop into place,and tried again and I haven't had a problem since. The first cam had over 2000 shots on it and the second is up to about 300 with lots of power ups.

The lens motor is powerful... thats why its so quick on startup, but that same power can cause the lens to "jam" if its obstructed.

I feel a lot of people get their lens stuck and are scared to touch it. It won't fix itself under its own power so they send it back.

After a little learning curve, and upgrading to the new firmware, I haven't seen the lens error. You just get used to holding the cam so as to prevent it (and perhaps the firmware helps a bit too!).

I think the 750 is the most feature-packed small cam available and really like mine.
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Old Aug 7, 2005, 1:11 PM   #4
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So in spite of the lens error problem, you would still recommend the Z750? Would you choose this model again? I know that there is no perfect camera, although this one sure sounded like it from the features and reviews. I am still torn b/t this one and the SD500, which has had its own problems with cracked LCD's, a humming sound during video and taking up much more SD memory space in movie mode than the Casio.
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Old Aug 7, 2005, 2:38 PM   #5
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Yeah, I suppose I would still get the 750 over the canon. The only other cam I would consider would be the sony P200 which has the sharpest shots (IMHO) of the small cameras. Its just not quite as pocketable as the 750, and doesn't have the great movie options that the 750 does.

If I had it to do over again, I would have ordered 3 cameras from Dell.com, and kept the one with the sharpest photos!(Well maybe not, but that's what I felt like doing) There's a rather lengthy thread on the RC forum I frequent about the ups and downs we've had with the 750. It may help with your decision. http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=367737

Like you said there's no perfect camera, but the 750 was as close as I could find at the time. It has manual features that others don't and movie abilities that no other cam in its class has.

I would probably purchase the same cam again for the features. I've never had the camera inoperative due to a lens problem for more than a few seconds. Not saying that it won't break today, but its the only cam I could find that would do all I wanted and still fit in my pocket.
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Old Aug 7, 2005, 9:46 PM   #6
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If you put the mode dial in audio record before putting it in your pocket or case you won't likely develop the problem. Mine has been problem free, but I do take that precaution. I think most of the serious lens error problems are caused by the lens trying to extend in the case or your pocket.

The Z750 is smaller than the SD500 with a larger LCD. The LCD isn't terribly high quality in terms of pixel density. The movies take a lot less space and it has the really handy past movie mode. You can just aim the camera and wait for something interesting to happen. So you don't have to grind away waiting for a lightening bolt or the toddler to do the cute thing again. You can push the shutter after it happens and it records the previous 5 seconds and continues to record until you stop it.

The control setup is the best I've seen for a small camera and much better than my large FZ10. Rather than ship with a throw-away memory card it makes excellent use of the internal memory. You can store a large photo album and custom scene modes on the permanent memory.

You might want to look at the Kodak V550 if you are concerned about the lens error. It is point and shoot like the SD500 but has a larger LCD of very high quality. It has MPEG4 movies without the past movie mode. The movies aren't quite up to the quality of the SD500 or Z750 because of a lower sample rate – at least I've read that is the difference. But you can use the optical zoom during movie recording – albeit with some noise in the sound track. It also lets you store a large photo album on the permanent memory. It is only 5Mp, but that is significant only if you want to make large prints or extreme crops.

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Old Aug 7, 2005, 11:24 PM   #7
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Mpeg-4 movie for Kodak v550, Casio S500 & Z750 - all same bit-rate: 500KB/sec.

But Casio video may have "rainbow ripple" problems when shooting densely black/white stripes. I am not sure if related to "purple fringe" or "chromatic aberration" problems or not.
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Old Aug 8, 2005, 5:35 AM   #8
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Thanks all. I am also intrigued by the soon-to-be-released Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX9 with 6mp. & image stabilization. I think it will be available around September 25. Is it out in any other country? Does anyone have it?
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