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Old Mar 5, 2006, 12:43 AM   #1
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Lately when i have taking pictures with and without flash, pictures on infiity will seem burry and not as clear as what they used to look like. I tried taking a picture of my room several and they all came out blurry as if they were unfocuused. Do you think it is my lens because i did accidentaly hit it when i pressed the on button. Is there a way to fix it??
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Old Mar 5, 2006, 8:18 AM   #2
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It's more likely your shutter speeds. Indoors, you'll most likely need to use a flash, unless you use a tripod and are taking photos of a stationary subject (otherwise, you'll get probably blur from camera shake and subject movement in most indoor condtions).

Outdoors, if light is not optimum, the same thing could be happening, especially if you're zooming in much (more than twice as much light reaches the sensor through the lens at it's widest zoom setting compared to it's longest zoom setting). Also, blur from camera shake is magnified as you zoom in more.

Have you changed the ISO speed?

I'm not sure how high Auto ISO goes with your model. But, each time you (or the camera's Auto ISO) doubles the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture. The tradeoff with using higher ISO speeds is more noise (similar to the way you get grainier photos using higher ISO speed film).

I'd also make sure you have focus lock when taking photos using a half press the shutter button and making sure it locks (focus indicators will turn green), then press it down the rest of the way to take the photo.

Using spot focus can help insure the camera is focusing on what you want it to (change the focus mode to use the center point, lock focus on a desired target by pressing the shutter button down half way, then reframe and press it the rest of the way down).

You can see some of the available options in Our Review of the Casio EX-Z750

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Old Mar 5, 2006, 10:18 AM   #3
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Did you get a lens error when you restricted the lens? There is usually no harm done if you don't get a lens error. Quite often people have them extend in their pocket and never know it though since it turns itself back off. And that can cause a lens error in tight pants like jeans. People can have all kinds of focus problems after restricting the lens and getting a lens error with the early versions of the camera.

If you are in infinity focus and getting blurred shots with decent shutter speeds outdoors of distant targets you have a focus problem. People can sometimes get them working right by pulling on the lens. Read through several pages of the forum and read what people who have had the error have done.

If the camera is still under warranty your best bet is to send it in for service.

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Old Mar 5, 2006, 11:16 AM   #4
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Hey thanks for your help. I'm pretty sure that it is a lens problem because everytime i zoom, zoom back out, and then take a pic, it is really clear. Has anyone found a way to fix this or have had similar problems?
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Old Mar 5, 2006, 11:43 AM   #5
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Do you get a focus lock with a half press of the shutter button in good light (outdoors in daylight) when pointing it at a subject (focus indicators turn green)?

That would be the first thing I'd try (make sure you get a focus lock before pressing the shutter button the rest of the way down).

If there is not enough contrast in your subject (or not enough light, and and well lit interior is low light to a camera), you'll get blurry images if you don't have a focus lock.

It may be damaged. But, I'd make sure to rule out something simple, first. ;-)

You may also want to try resetting all parameters back to factory defaults.

You'll see the menu for doing this if you scroll down to the bottom of this page:

slipe seems to be very familiar with this model, so perhaps he can comment further on it. But, I'd make sure it's not something that you're doing wrong first (like not making sure you're getting a good focus lock before taking a photo in less than optimum lighting).

P.S.

Not using a half press of the shutter button to insure a good focus lock is a very common issue (from users of all camera models). I make sure I've got a good lock before taking a photo with any Autofocus Camera I use (film or digital).

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Old Mar 5, 2006, 11:53 AM   #6
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Yes I always make sure to press half down to lock the focus. Also I also reset all parameters and its still unfocused
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Old Mar 5, 2006, 12:02 PM   #7
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Then it may be defective, unless shutter speed is the issue (another common problem, because what is bright to the human eye is not to the camera's lens, and in order to properly expose the image, the camera must leave the shutter open long enough).

If you zoom in more, the sensor gets less light (which can result in blur from slower shutter speeds in less than optimum lighting).

I'd post some examples here and let users see what the camera settings are.

You'll need to downsize the images to around 700 pixels wide so that they aren't too big to be viewed easily here.

Make sure to use unedited originals for this purpose so that the EXIF (a header containing image settings) isn't stripped out (some editors will remove it).

One you can use for this purpose is Irfanview (it's free).

Open an image with it and go to the "Resize/Resample" menu choice. Downsize it to about 700 pixels wide using any of the algorithms available. Use the same options I've got checked here (set new size, preserve aspect ratio), and you'll be fine with it. If you enter 700 pixels on the left side, it will automatically enter the right number of pixels for the other side. I typically use Lanczos for reszing.

Then, go to the File, Save As menu choice, give it a new name and set the JPEG quality slider to around 85% (that will make sure it's a small enough file size to post here). Make sure the retain original EXIF check box remains checked (it will be by default).

When you are making a new post in this thread, you'll see a browse button to attach the saved image.

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Old Mar 5, 2006, 12:07 PM   #8
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Or, if you already have an image uploaded somewhere else that hasn't been edited, just post a link to it so we can take a look to try and see what's going wrong (we can look at things like ISO speed, aperture, and shutter speed with tools that see this data in an image files header).

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Old Mar 5, 2006, 12:15 PM   #9
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I don't think it is anything you are doing wrong. Several people have developed that exact same problem after a lens error on early models. I would call Casio support and see about sending it in for service.

You might read through this board and the Casio forum over on dpreview to see if someone hasn't come up with a homegrown fix for that particular problem. But I think the standard fix is service from Casio.

I'm guessing you have one of the early models that came with firmware 1.00. Upgrading the firmware doesn't help with the lens problems but is very worthwhile if you haven't done it. They are up to 1.02.

When you get your camera back carry it in the audio record mode so the lens doesn't extend if the power button is accidentally pressed in a restricted space. And you want to disable the instant-on from the record or view buttons if you activated that feature. I have one of the early models and haven't had problems, but I was lucky enough to have read about the problem before I got the lens screwed up. It doesn't say much for Casio's field testing of their equipment that they released the camera with such fragile lens gearing. They say it isn't their problem since they don't make the lens and that it is a user problem, both of which irritate me a little. It was Casio that put the instant-on feature on a camera that shouldn't have had such a feature and their name is on the camera.

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Old Mar 5, 2006, 12:25 PM   #10
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Thanks slipe

I remember another Casio with an issue like this you were commenting on yesterday.

So, yes, cameras can develop problems that require fixing.

Macday000

If I were you, I'd still rule out something you may be doing wrong, just to make sure it's not something simple before I'd send my camera in for service. :-)

You can see information on your camera settings to rule out some issues like shutter speed.

After opening an image using Irfanview, look under "Image, Information, EXIF"

You can also use the "Copy to Clipboard" button you'll see when viewing EXIF information, then use your browsers "Edit, Paste" function to post this information here.

The "rule of thumb" for preventing blur from camera shake is 1/focal length. In other words, if shooting at a 35mm equivalent focal length of 40mm, you'd want to keep your shutter speeds at 1/40 second or faster.

But, as you zoom in more, camera shake is magnified. For example, if zooming in to a 35mm equivalent focal length of 100mm, you'd want shutter speeds of 1/100 second or faster.

This is only a rule of thumb, since some people can hold a camera steadier than others, and some people may need even faster shutter speeds. How smoothly you are pressing the shutter button also enters this equation.

Not realizing how low light is (and not compensating by setting higher ISO speeds or using a tripod), is a common cause of blurry images.

slipe is probably right and it's a problem with the camera. But, it wouldn't hurt to rule out common issues with settings and lighting first, since a lot of users think their camera is defective, when it's only a shutter speed issue.



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