Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Close-ups

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 12, 2006, 7:56 PM   #1
Log
Senior Member
 
Log's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 394
Default

Daylily from my garden... please comment on what i could do to improve!

Logan










PS: these were shot at around 845 in the evening... so take that into consideration!

Thanks for looking
Log is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 12, 2006, 8:57 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
surfnron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 578
Default

I really like the first one Log.
Ron
surfnron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12, 2006, 8:58 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Morag2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 820
Default

They are all very nice, I'm afraid I can't give you quite as good advice as the pro's around here, but I'll do what I can.

The first picture is nice, although I don't like the angle it's taken at and the way it seems very sloped towards the left on the picture.

The second one seemed a bit off center to me... after a closer look it doesn't really seem to be much off center, it just appeared that way for some reason, I would try raising it a bit.

The third one has no problems that are big enough for me to recognize, I like the way the grass all seems to go away from the flower, kind of like a natural frame.

The fourth one, I think it would look a little bit nicer if you were more directly above the flower (the angle you're at looks a bit odd) but it's really not much of a problem. It also looks a bit strange when most of the background is black but there are a few green shoots around it (not much you can do about that though I guess)

All in all, the only problems were minor ones and they are all excellent shots, very clear and the lighting is just about perfect. Great job.
Morag2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12, 2006, 9:34 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 231
Default

What sort of camera are you using? I'll wait until you reply before I give any specific suggestions. In the meantime... can I play with your last shot and repost it?
gracie328 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12, 2006, 9:39 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 231
Default

One thing I'll go ahead and say... find an angle in between what you've been shooting. You are either looking straight forward right smack in front of the bloom or you are almost totally level with the side. Try standing in front of the bloom then just shifting to give a slight angle... but not huge... in other words, you still want the front/top of the flower to be your primary focus...not the sides. Does that make sense? I think it will be a more flatteringview of these flowers.
gracie328 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12, 2006, 9:45 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 231
Default

And one more question... do you have any other colors of daylilies that you could shoot for practice?Yellows can really be difficult to expose... even for a seasoned photographer. I have a really hard time with yellows... as a matter of fact, I have very few successful shots of the very flower you are shooting. My last post was probably my best by far, but whether I could repeat it would be a challenge.
gracie328 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12, 2006, 10:51 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
squirl033's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 6,699
Default

in this case, poor lighting was your worst enemy. don't be afraid to use a fill flash for shots like these. if you're worried about the flash being too bright, put a couple of layers of paper towel or a piece of printer paper over the flash - looks funky, but makes a great "poor man's diffuser", cuts down the light to avoid washing the image out.

as for composition, as Morag mentioned, try shooting from off center, but not so far as to be perpendicular to the bloom. Also, if you can, try to isolate the bloom with DOF to make it stand out from the background. where the flower is bright and the BG is dark, this is pretty easy to do, buf if the reverse is true, or if the flower and the BG are both equally bright or dark, try to use aperture to separate the bloom from the background.

don't worry too much about whether the flower is centered in the frame. some folks have this hangup about the "rule of thirds", which is fine for landscapes and artsy shots, but for flowers, especially for your own enjoyment, compose it any way you want.

otherwise, these look very good. yellow, like white, is a hard color to photograph, because in bright light it tends to blow out easily, and if you expose it properly, a darker BG will appear to be nothing but shadows. that's why shots of yellow or white flowers - or anything else those colors, for that matter - are best taken in early morning or late afternoon, with filtered light or very slanted sun, which avoids blown highlights and helps reduce harsh shadows.
squirl033 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12, 2006, 11:41 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 231
Default

Quote:
don't worry too much about whether the flower is centered in the frame. some folks have this hangup about the "rule of thirds", which is fine for landscapes and artsy shots, but for flowers, especially for your own enjoyment, compose it any way you want.
I agree somewhat with this statement. The rule of thirds isn't 'written in stone'... and centered works well witha lot ofshots, but for shots of a flower where there'sexcess background, I think applying the rule of thirds does make for a stronger, more interestingphoto. Now, if you frame your pic or crop to where the subject fills the frame (sort of a portrait type shot), then the centered works much better.

Here's a couple of links where you can read about the rule of thirds and make your own decision. The second link has lots of good examples.

http://www.silverlight.co.uk/tutoria...se/thirds.html

http://images.google.com/images?q=ru...s&ct=title

gracie328 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 12, 2006, 11:55 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
squirl033's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 6,699
Default

agreed. i tend to shoot flowers in a more "portrait" format, focusing mostly on the flower, without a lot of background. if the BG is more than, say, 50% of the photo area, a different, less "centered" composition may well be in order, depending on the BG and other factors.
squirl033 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 13, 2006, 6:35 AM   #10
Log
Senior Member
 
Log's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 394
Default

id like to thank you all for the comments... Gracie... im using a kodak dx6490 for the next week and then ill have my d50... go ahead and edit as you wish!... i wish we had more daylilies... alot didnt come up this year and my grandmother brought these yellow over... we used to have these pale pinks/lavenders with a darker burst of color... they were quite beautiful but they didnt come up this year and we dont know why...

Logan

PS maybe today after biology ill have a go at the tigerlily(s) in my garden... but there again... there arent many that are doing too well... so we will se what i can get!
Log is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:22 AM.