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Old Apr 29, 2008, 6:05 PM   #1
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:?These cameras have been out for quite some time now. I don't understand why it's taking so long
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Old Apr 30, 2008, 5:37 AM   #2
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Hi,

From this thread http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...89&forum_id=98it seems that the D300 is almost complete and the D3 will be worked on pretty soon.

Thanks,

Mark
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Old May 2, 2008, 5:36 PM   #3
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The D300 review is posted and we are pleased to have JimC of our Forums preparing his impressions of the camera. We hope to post his comments at the end of the Concluision early next week. We are just getting started on the D3. Please stay tuned.
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Old Dec 29, 2009, 2:44 AM   #4
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any news about the D3 review ?
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Old Dec 29, 2009, 8:13 AM   #5
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See this page for my impressions of this model:

Pushing the Limits: The Nikon D3
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Old May 23, 2012, 1:04 AM   #6
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How come I can't find the Nikon D3 review? The D4 preview is out.
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Old May 23, 2012, 1:52 AM   #7
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We had some unexpected issues come up and we didn't manage to complete the D3 review (menus, iso series, etc.).
Instead, we published a short article about it here:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/knowl...-nikon-d3.html

But, I tell you what... I just happen to have a copy (unedited draft) of what would have likely been the conclusion section for it after correction for any errors. Here you go:

It has been nearly three years since our Nikon D2x review, and professional photographers waiting for Nikon's latest flagship model have been rewarded with the D3, Nikon's first Digital SLR with a full frame (FX format) 36 x 23.9mm 12.1MP CMOS Sensor. The D3 is Nikon's new top of the line digital SLR with the build quality, image quality and performance that professional photographers demand.

The Nikon D3 incorporates a wave of new improvements, including ISO speeds up to 25600 available as a boost option, a 51 Point Autofocus Sensor, the latest image processing with tunable noise reduction, a 3” 922,000 pixel LCD, a kevlar/carbon fiber based shutter that's rated at 300,000 actuations, a very fast 9 frames per second continuous shooting with sophisticated 3D Autofocus Tracking using subject color, and even dual CompactFlash card slots with UDMA support. The D3 can also provide a DX (cropped) view with even faster frame rates (up to 11 frames per second).

Because of it's larger imaging sensor compared to previous Nikon dSLR models, the D3 increased in size to accommodate a larger mirror box, a new shutter mechanism, a larger pentaprism housing and more. The D3's build quality is superb, with great fit and finish, using a solid feeling magnesium alloy body that's equipped with weather sealing against dust and moisture.

The D3's large optical viewfinder is a pleasure to use, with a full 100% frame coverage at 0.7x magnification, displaying a wealth of information allowing you to keep your eye on the subjects, confident of your results, thanks to in part to the rapidly responding Autofocus system with active Autofocus points highlighted in the viewfinder.

The D3 is a hefty camera by consumer standards, weighing in at 2.7 pounds for the body alone. Because it's using a larger imaging sensor compared to previous Nikon dSLR models, the size of this model also increased to accommodate a larger mirror box, new shutter mechanism, a larger pentaprism and more. The D3's build quality is superb, with great fit and finish, using a solid feeling magnesium alloy body that's equipped with weather sealing against dust and moisture. When combined with the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G AF-S lens, which weighs in at 2.4 pounds by itself, this camera/lens combination weighs in at a hefty 5.1 pounds. Despite it's size and weight, we found this combination to be comfortable to use, offering more stability for hand held photos in low light at slower shutter speeds.

We found the D3's Autofocus System to be superb, with an uncanny ability to rapidly lock on to a subject and track it, regardless of the lighting. There are many easy to use options for focusing, including single or continuous servo AF, single focus area, dynamic AF, or select from either 11 or 51 focus points on the fly. Of course full manual focus is available, too. Custom Settings are provided to specify Release or Focus priority for both single and continuous AF modes.

The D3 has a wide range of exposure options available, including Manual, Program AE with shift, Shutter speed priority up to 1/8,000 sec, Aperture priority, AE Bracketing, WB bracketing, exposure compensation of +/-5EV in 1/3EV steps, single frame drive mode or continuous drive modes at up to 9fps in FX format or 11fps in DX format. The D3 offers three metering modes: 3D Color Matrix II, Center-weighted averaging (with your choice of the weighted area: 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 13mm, entire frame) or 3mm Spot. Each of the three metering methods can be individually fine tuned as well. White balance options are also numerous with presets for Auto, Incandescent, Fluorescent, Direct Sunlight, Flash, Cloudy and Shade, direct selection of color temperature, plus five manual white balance presets you can save and later recall. The pre-programmed WB presets can also be fine tuned.

Nikon's D3 has a wide variety of shooting parameters available, and Nikon has provided a Shooting Menu Bank consisting of four independent areas in which you can store and later recall frequently-used settings, banks A through D. You can also rename these banks to fit the situation in which you use them (like Portrait for example), helping you to recall their purpose later. It also provides Custom Setting Banks to store unique combinations that can be later recalled, simplifying the management of the camera's Custom Settings. This model also has a Picture Controls function, which allows you to share image processing settings with other D3 bodies (great for those professionals that have backup bodies) and software.

The D3's predictive focus tracking feature worked extremely well, almost effortless tracking moving subjects, performing better than expected at tasks like shooting rapidly moving race cars at a night. Like the D300, Nikon's new D3 has a Focus Tracking with Lock On feature that allows you to tune the camera so that it ignores abrupt focus changes for user specified periods of Short, Normal or Long. This helps the camera maintain focus on your subject when it is briefly obscured by another object passing through the frame. The D3's Focus Tracking also uses Color information for even better subject tracking. It's an extremely fast and reliable system, giving a high percentage of in focus images in the toughest of conditions.

Nikon has continued to improve image processing with newer generations of cameras, and we were pleased with the JPEG image quality using the camera's default settings. It's also obvious to us that Dynamic Range is improved over previous generations of Nikon dSLR models, with better ability to maintain highlight detail in difficult lighting.

The Nikon D3 does not have a built in flash. Instead, it has a regular PC flash sync connector so it can be used with any type of studio lights or external flash units. It also has a flash hot shoe to accommodate Nikon Speedlights, and when combined with a flash like the Nikon SB-800 or SB-600 Speedlight, the D3 supports a variety of Nikon's Creative Lighting System features, including i-TTL flash control, Flash Value Lock, Auto FP High-Speed Sync (allowing flash with shutter speeds up to 1/8000 second), Wide-Area AF Assist Illumination, Flash Color Information Communication (providing the camera with the color temperature of the flash for white balance adjustment). This system offers a variety of flash sync modes, including Curtain Sync (normal sync), Red-Eye Reduction, Red-Eye Reduction with Slow Sync, Slow Sync and Rear-Curtain Sync.

The D3 has exceptionally good image quality with very low noise levels at sensitivity settings up to ISO 1600. Noise begins to appear at higher ISO speeds, but the D3 provides in-camera Noise Reduction that is controlled by the camera's menu system, allowing finer control of it's image processing. High ISO NR (Noise Reduction) can be set to Off, Low, Normal and High settings to control the degree of Noise Reduction at the highest ISO speeds, allowing a user to achieve the desired balance between detail and noise.

We were pleased with the results and found this system to work exceptionally well using the camera's default Normal Noise Reduction setting. Please see our Samples page for examples of High ISO NR results on images taken throughout the ISO range, and note that the race car images were all at ISO 6400, which we still felt was very acceptable for most print sizes, offering much higher image quality than we're accustomed to seeing at ISO speeds this high.

In low light, the D3's performance while using a Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G EF-S lens was nothing less than amazing, allowing the capture of images in much dimmer lighting that you would normally be able to shoot in using a dSLR with a zoom lens. The D3's ISO sensitivity is has a normal range from ISO 200 to 6400, with a variation between ISO steps of 1/3EV, 1/2EV or 1EV. The available ISO boost settings provide ISO equivalent sensitivities of up to 25,600, which can be very useful in dim lighting. See the ISO 25,600 images of Live Music in the D3 Samples Images for one example of how this feature can let you shoot in very low light, and still capture images that can be used at typical viewing and print sizes. If you want the best possible dSLR for low light shooting, look no further than the D3.

The Nikon D3 represents Nikon's best effort to date in producing a Professional Level tool that any photographer can appreciate. It's rugged build quality with weather sealing, superb Autofocus System, excellent image quality, and ultra fast performance should make it the camera of choice for many photographers wanting the best equipment available. The D3 is a professional level tool that allows a photographer to capture high quality images in the most demanding conditions, and we applaud Nikon's design. We have no reservations giving the D3 our highest recommendation.

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Old May 23, 2012, 2:20 AM   #8
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Thanks for that. Too bad you missed the review of the greatest Nikon ever made... at that point in time anyways. I just got a great deal on a low shutter count one. Taken me that long to get up to this level.
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Old Jul 11, 2012, 10:49 AM   #9
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Was a reply from alisa98ST deleted?
My Notifications said so.
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Nikon D700 w/Nikkor 20mm f/2.8
Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-4.5D ED VR
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Old Jul 11, 2012, 11:00 AM   #10
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alasa98st was a spammer, and had hidden links in the [numerous] posts made since joining the forums this morning.

For example, posts with content like this in the signature including links with affiliate IDs:

Quote:
Shop Amazon - Buy Eligible Print Magazines & Get Digital Kindle Subscriptions Free
Shop Amazon - Up to 50 Off Home Improvement Value Store
Colors matching the background were used so that the spam was not visible to viewers, yet it would still show up in search engines. That's a technique we're seeing relatively often anymore, so that spam is not noticed by members and moderators. I became suspicious when a large number of old posts were being responded to, and when I used post edit features and went to non WYSIWYG mode that shows the BBCode, I noticed the hidden spam. Spammers do that kind of thing more and more anymore to evade detection (include hidden spam in their signatures).
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