Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Misc Forums > Digiscoping/Digital Photomicroscopy

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 27, 2008, 2:21 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Tom Rowland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3
Default

I have been using my CP4500 for astrophotography for some time.

I have two eye pieces with 37mm threads so I can easily attach the camera to the EP. I also have several adapters both up and down which has allowed me to attach my FLUZI to an eye piece. I also have an eye piece with a T-mount thread on it so I can attach my dslrs to the eye piece. I have T-mounts that allow me to attach dslrs to my TeleVue Powermate. Finally I have T-mounts that allow me to attach my dslr directly to an OTA (Optical Tube Assembly; what some folks call a telescope).

Well recently I got a new toy. It is a Solar Spectrum filter that allows me to view the sun through a telescope in the hydrogen alpha band width. It has a T-mount as well as a place to put a diagonal/eye piece.

My experience has been that it is much easier to get good IQ using the 4500 shooting afocal than a dslr shooting prime focus; unless I am trying to capture a DSO that needs exposures measured in minutes at which point the better ISO of a dslr beats the digicam.

But I will be trying to capture images of the sun, and you guessed it; even with strong filters the sun is quite bright.

So what I am trying to find out is if there is any more modern digicam than the Nikon rubic cube cp models with the same nice features those cameras have; small physical lens size to limit vignetting, light weight, and an adjustable LCD so I dont have to get in strange positions to view it.

What do you guys think? I have been out of the digicam market for a while; and have a bunch of dlsrs, and older digicams; should I try and up grade the 4500 or just stick with it.
Tom Rowland is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 2, 2009, 10:53 AM   #2
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,139
Default

Hey Tom,

Nice to see you here. Actually, the CP4500 is a pretty good tool for what you have in mind. There are a few newer cameras which have more resolution, but you really don't need it for this type thing. The difference in 10 megapixel and 4 megapixel is totally insignificant for this type photography.

I think sticking with the CP4500 is fine as long as you are getting the results you want.

Best regards,

Lin
Lin Evans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 2, 2009, 11:13 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Tom Rowland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3
Default

Hi Lin;

It is not so much that the results I get from the 4500 are bad; but rather ease of use.

I have lots of nice images captured with it; but almost all of the were taken at night.

The result is that the door that closes over the CF card is kinda broken and will no longer close unless I tape it.

The hole where I plug in the AV out to connect to my monitor (and use to connect to a TV in the day) has a small crack around it from hard use (I would often set up my telescope with the 4500 attached at astronomy star parties and outreach events and peeps might trip over it or I would be a little hard on it).

If I could buy a brand new 4500 I would; and still have a very nice 995 that all the doors work on. But I know sooner or later I will have to get a new digicam for this purpose and was sorta planning in advance for that day.

The biggest problem I am having in getting a new digicam or perhaps mini video camcorder is that few of them have threads on the lens to attach things.

I am probably going to Japan for the solar eclipse this year and want to make sure I have a working imaging device for that event.
Tom Rowland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 2, 2009, 12:31 PM   #4
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,139
Default

Hi Tom,

You might want to have a look at one of the Contax models like the
SL300RT or the U4RT. A few of these are still available new I believe.

go here to read Andy Bright's review:

http://www.digiscoped.com/ContaxSL300RT.html

Best regards,

Lin
Lin Evans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 7, 2009, 9:18 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 65
Default

I do not think you can beat the Canon A-590 for digiscoping, and it is availble for about $120 dollars. I currently like the Lumix LX3. The lens retracts about 7/16 of an inch during zoom. To make the best use of it you need to be able to follow that retraction back with the eyepiece, but remove it when the camera lens resets to the extended position. I do this by mounting my eyepiece in a two inch tube so it is adjustable. The two inch tube fits two inch focusers on my telescopes.

Anycamera for digiscoping is obsolete after a couple of years.
Gene9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 8, 2009, 1:48 AM   #6
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,139
Default

Hi Gene,

Though there are things to like about the A-590, there are also drawbacks which prevent it from being a serious choice for many digiscopers.

The externally telescoping lens, no filter threads and no remote control of shutter make it problematic for many.

The Nikon CP series have 28mm filter threads which allow mounting directly to threaded, dedicated eyepieces, they have electronics adaptable to use with triggering devices such as the Harbortronics DigiSnap series which can control not only shutter release and focus but even zoom without physically touching the setup. They also have focus confirmation which reveals exactly where the focus point is and can help get that critical focus necessary for crisp images at extreme focal lengths.

Digital cameras in general may be outdated in a couple years, but the CP series Nikons are far from being "obsolete" for digiscoping and are still widely in use by hundreds of digiscopers around the world as are the Contax units and their Kyocera equivalents.

There are always alternatives such as the smaller Canons and even a number of Olympus digicams, but the choice of most master digiscopers are still the older Nikons, Contax/Kyocera, etc., because of their unique adaptibility.

Best regards,

Lin

Gene9 wrote:
Quote:
I do not think you can beat the Canon A-590 for digiscoping, and it is availble for about $120 dollars. I currently like the Lumix LX3. The lens retracts about 7/16 of an inch during zoom. To make the best use of it you need to be able to follow that retraction back with the eyepiece, but remove it when the camera lens resets to the extended position. I do this by mounting my eyepiece in a two inch tube so it is adjustable. The two inch tube fits two inch focusers on my telescopes.

Anycamera for digiscoping is obsolete after a couple of years.
Lin Evans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 8, 2009, 11:29 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Tom Rowland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3
Default

I have to agree with Lin about the 4500. I use a little different setup. I have some cables I got from Shoestringastronomydotcom; and the cost is in line with the name of the place. I am using HocusFocus for software to control the camera so it is a hands off the camera operation.

But I would like an update of the 4500.
Tom Rowland is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:41 PM.