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-   -   Bounce flash for A80? (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/flash-external-52/bounce-flash-a80-29768/)

cheewooi Jul 19, 2004 12:05 PM

Hi,
Have some question about bounce flash.I have a raft idea on what's bounce flash. However, can anyone tell me what do actually bounce flash do? what kind of photography use bounce flash is it portrait photography? I thinking on doing my own bounce flash for my A80..just another DIY session to experiment how the bounce flash works and how it affect the lighting on my photos..Anyway all sorty of help or info appreciated! Thanks
:lol:

Mikefellh Jul 19, 2004 12:36 PM

A bounce flash allows you to change the angle of the flash and bounce light off the ceiling or wall for indirect lighting rather than having the flash straight on the person's face.

However, your camera is a inexpensive point and shoot which has no ability to connect an external flash. There's only one way to use a flash with your camera and that's via a slave. A slave is a device which triggers a flash wirelessly when it sees a bright light (the camera's internal flash, or the flash of someone elses camera).

Personally, I suggest upgrading your camera before worrying about adding flash power. There are inexpensive slave flashes you can get, I personally own a $150 slave flash (Metz 34-CS2), but you might get a cheaper one.

Suggest you hit the library for a book on flash photography, it doesn't have to be on digital cameras.

JimC Jul 19, 2004 12:47 PM

The problem with a flash is that the light can be harsh. You can also end up with only your subject being properly illuminated, with a much darker background. This is because the camera must "throttle down" the flash output, using just enough flash to properly expose your subject (leaving the background dark).

Using a bounce flash allows you to "bounce" the light (i.e., off the ceiling), diffusing it, so that you have much more even illumination of your subject (versus the harsher light of a direct flash than can cause reflections and shadows), and it better illuminates the non-subject areas of your image, too.

There are other ways to bounce the light, too. For example, I've got an old Vivitar 273, withthe optional "soft light/bounce diffuser kit". Basically, it's a whitepanel that sitsbehind, and slightly above the flash. The flash can then be bounced off of the white panel, which disperses the light. This dispersion (i.e. diffusion) of the light is much less harsh, than a direct flash at your subject would be.

From what I can tell glancing through the specs for your A80, it does not support an external flash.

However, you can buy flash units designed to operate as a "slave flash". Basically, these models fire, at the same time they see the camera's main flash fire. Note that some cameras use a "pre-flash" to measure exposure, before firing the flash again for the photo. I'm not sure which way your A80 flash works.

In any event, some slave flash models can be set to operate either way (first flash, or second flash from the camera, before they fire). Make sure you buy one that works in the same way as your camera. You can also buy a separate slave flash trigger device, designed to operate flashes that were not designed to be used as slaves. They look for the camera's flash, then trigger the flash hooked up to them.

Since your A80 does not appear to support an external flash, use of a slave may also require you to experiment with the camera in manual exposure mode, in orderto get proper exposure (since the camera will think that it's built-inflash is the only light source).

Added:

One other comment regarding the use of a slave flash. If you arein an area with others taking flash photos, too; then theflashes from their cameras can trigger your slave.

cheewooi Dec 28, 2004 6:23 AM

Finally got my Achiever 115A/S Slave flash unit

http://www.achiever.com.hk/Product/Flash/auto5.jpg

Have some problem here...how does I mount it on A80? Thinking of making my own flash bracket.. I tried holding my hand and bounce the flash to the ceiling but there's only part of the image is illuminated. Is there any possibilities to make the light softer and illuminate the whole photos? How about stofem omnibounce?

Can I make my own 1? Slighty budget constraint here.haha:-)

JohnP Dec 30, 2004 8:00 AM

I received a Phoenix D92-BZS digital slave unit for Christmas which I have been experimenting with my Canon A80. Using the manual settings on the A80 I set the aperture to f2.8 and the shutter speed to 1/60. The unit works quite nicely but I'm a little confused about which level to set the camera's built in flash output. The A80 has a single flash output and the slave unit can accomodate both single and double flashes. I like the indirect lighting effect because it is less harsh and seems to minimize red eye. I'm happy with this model but would suggest experimenting before shooting a wedding or special occasion

KCan Dec 30, 2004 3:52 PM

cheewooi wrote:
Quote:

how does I mount it on A80? Thinking of making my own flash bracket..
Yes, you need a bracket, search on the web for "flash bracket" and you will findtons of ideas.

cheewooi wrote:

Quote:

holding my hand and bounce the flash to the ceiling but there's only part of the image is illuminated.
I guess you need a bit more powerful flash

cheewooi wrote:
Quote:

Is there any possibilities to make the light softer and illuminate the whole photos? How about stofem omnibounce?

Can I make my own 1? Slighty budget constraint here.haha:-)
Of course you can make your own, take a look here for ideas:

http://www.lumiquest.com/



borrisspider Jan 8, 2005 8:40 AM

Hi,

A really cheap trick that can work very well providing the light level is not too low is find a way to reflect the built in flash up at abount 45 degrees and then off the ceiling. I used this to get around the shadow caused by using a wide converter on my A85. The soltion is a bit of thin glossy plastic (base of margarine tub) cut to shape and attached to the adaptor tube of the A85 with an elastic band. The advantage of this solution is it cost nothing and is very small and light to carry!

The dissadvantage is that asthetically it looks really naff and the built in flash is not powerfull enough to iluminate anything very far away. Still, you get what you pay for.

Cheers, Chris.

cheewooi Jan 8, 2005 8:30 PM

borrisspider wrote:
Quote:

Hi,

A really cheap trick that can work very well providing the light level is not too low is find a way to reflect the built in flash up at abount 45 degrees and then off the ceiling. I used this to get around the shadow caused by using a wide converter on my A85. The soltion is a bit of thin glossy plastic (base of margarine tub) cut to shape and attached to the adaptor tube of the A85 with an elastic band. The advantage of this solution is it cost nothing and is very small and light to carry!

The dissadvantage is that asthetically it looks really naff and the built in flash is not powerfull enough to iluminate anything very far away. Still, you get what you pay for.

Cheers, Chris.
Do you have any photos? can't get it what you mean actually...:-)

I_need_help Feb 20, 2005 5:04 AM

And the Phoenix D92-BZS (or the Achiever 115A/S) really works with the A80?
Could you be so kind to show us some examples with/wihtout the slaves flash?

Thanks in advance.


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