Steve's Digicams Forums

Steve's Digicams Forums (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/)
-   Flash (External) (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/flash-external-52/)
-   -   Slave flash to solve red eye on compact digital cameras? (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/flash-external-52/slave-flash-solve-red-eye-compact-digital-cameras-18320/)

sjm817 Dec 30, 2003 11:36 AM

Slave flash to solve red eye on compact digital cameras?
 
I've tried a couple of compact digital cameras and have had issues with each of them with red eye. And yes, I know it can be fixed in post processing, but that is not the answer I'm looking for.

To move up to a camera with a hot shoe, it gets into a more expensive model, and a larger camera as well. The Canon G3 and Olympus 5050 both look great except for the above. A Canon A80 is probably the camera that i will be using.

Digi-Slave http://www.srelectronics.com/ has some nice slave flashes that are triggered optically by the built in flash, and have a provision to work with digital camera pre flash. They are mounted fairly high off the camera with a bracket that connects to the tripod hole.

This seems like the answer to my problem.

How much functionality would I lose using a "dumb" slave flash compared to a "smart" hot shoe setup such as a Canon G3 and 420EX?

Will this eliminate red eye in indoor flash shots?

KCan Dec 30, 2003 6:32 PM

Re: Slave flash to solve red eye on compact digital cameras?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sjm817
How much functionality would I lose using a "dumb" slave flash compared to a "smart" hot shoe setup such as a Canon G3 and 420EX?

With a “dumb” slave flash, you lose the TTL controlled flash feature of course. This may be very important if you are not the kind to bother with settings and calculating …
You then will be left with 2 choices:
- Manual mode : you set the flash to full, or fractional power setting (if available); then calculate the aperture of the camera to be set . The speed will control the exposition of anything not reached by the flash (far background, and ambient lighting)
- Auto mode : if the flash offers this mode , you set the camera aperture according to the flash setting; a sensor on the flash insure that the flash burst is stopped at the right moment ( or at the right “power”) no matter the distance ( of course , in the capacity range of the flash)

One important thing is since you have a standard hotshoe, you can use any other flashes via the hot shoe ( if they does not have high trigger voltage, and the polarity is correct) in both manual or auto mode (if the flash offers that mode)
You are not “caught” with a slave flash. Said another way, you don’t have to pay for the “preflash slaving feature” of those slave flash. They are made for camera which does not have hotshoe or pc sync terminal.


Quote:

Originally Posted by sjm817
Will this eliminate red eye in indoor flash shots?

Very likely , almost sure , because the flash is moved out of the camera lens axis.

KCan Dec 30, 2003 6:40 PM

FYI:
some other thread with related question ( a non dedicated flash on hotshoe)

http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=10073

http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=3630

Torb Feb 12, 2004 5:05 AM

If I have a camera with no hot shoe for external flash (Canon S1 SI), can I get rid of problems with red eye by using an external slave flash, without covering the internal flash (stop it from illuminating the motiv) in order to just trig the slave flash?

ohenry Feb 12, 2004 9:09 AM

Increasing the lighting in the room helps with the red-eye problem. If possible, turn on some room lights behind you so that your subjects are facing the light.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:38 AM.