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Old Oct 28, 2006, 6:54 AM   #1
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Hi.

It is the first time I write in your forum.

I was given a old Sunpak 522 Auto flash in working condition, and I want to read something about using it.

Is any informations available online, or can somebodyhelp otherwise?

Thank you in advance.

Theodore.

Athens Greece
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Old Oct 28, 2006, 10:41 AM   #2
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What camera model are you planning to use it with?

This model has Auto modes that are designed to let you select an Aperture Range on the strobe (and you have multiple choices), along with an ISO speed. Then, shoot within the range you see for the selected Aperture/ISO speed combination.

With most cameras, you set the Camera you use it with to Manual Exposure mode and pick the same aperture and ISO speed as you have set on the flash. Then, select a shutter speed that's about right for the amount of ambient light you want to let in.

Around 1/100 second would probably make a good starting point. Indoors in most conditions at lower ISO speeds, the strobe will be providing most of the light, and shutter speed won't impact the amount of light the camera sees from the strobe (because the flash burst likely be 1/1000 second or faster).

Then, when you use it, the flash automatically controls it's own output based on how much light it sees reflected, terminating it's output when it sees enough light for the selected Aperture Range (it's got a tiny built in sensor for this purpose).

It also has manual power settings if you want to use it that way versus using one the Auto Aperture Ranges.

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Old Oct 28, 2006, 11:01 AM   #3
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JimC wrote:
Quote:
What camera model are you planning to use it with?

This model has Auto modes that are designed to let you select an Aperture Range on the strobe (and you have multiple choices), along with an ISO speed. Then, shoot within the range you see for the selected Aperture/ISO speed combination.

With most cameras, you set the Camera you use it with to Manual Exposure mode and pick the same aperture and ISO speed as you have set on the flash. Then, select a shutter speed that's about right for the amount of ambient light you want to let in.

Around 1/100 second would probably make a good starting point. Indoors in most conditions at lower ISO speeds, the strobe will be providing most of the light, and shutter speed won't impact the amount of light the camera sees from the strobe (because the flash burst likely be 1/1000 second or faster).

Then, when you use it, the flash automatically controls it's own output based on how much light it sees reflected, terminating it's output when it sees enough light for the selected Aperture Range (it's got a tiny built in sensor for this purpose).

It also has manual power settings if you want to use it that way versus using one the Auto Aperture Ranges.
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Thank you for your response.
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I have my good old F2AS to begin with.
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Theodore.
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Old Oct 28, 2006, 11:11 AM   #4
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Scratch the part about 1/100 second making a good starting point then.

Your F2AS has a fastest x-sync speed of 1/80 second. So, I'd probably set your shutter speed at 1/80 or 1/60 indoors.

If you try to use it much faster than 1/80, you'll start seeing a black band on your images, because the film won't be completed exposed to the short flash burst at faster shutter speeds.

Around 1/60 second is a good compromise with most models indoors (it's fast enough at lower ISO speeds at most apertures that your subject won't be properly exposed, except during the short flash burst, so the flash itself freezes the action).

If you go a little slower, than can help to let a bit more ambient light in. But, if you let too much in, you'll start getting motion blur (since the flash will be providing less of the light and the ambient light may be strong enough to see motion blur at wider apertures, depending on lighting and ISO speed).
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Old Oct 28, 2006, 11:30 AM   #5
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JimC wrote:
Quote:
Scratch the part about 1/100 second making a good starting point then.

Your F2AS has a fastest x-sync speed of 1/80 second. So, I'd probably set your shutter speed at 1/80 or 1/60 indoors.

If you try to use it much faster than 1/80, you'll start seeing a black band on your images, because the film won't be completed exposed to the short flash burst at faster shutter speeds.

Around 1/60 second is a good compromise with most models indoors (it's fast enough at lower ISO speeds at most apertures that your subject won't be properly exposed, except during the short flash burst, so the flash itself freezes the action).

If you go a little slower, than can help to let a bit more ambient light in. But, if you let too much in, you'll start getting motion blur (since the flash will be providing less of the light and the ambient light may be strong enough to see motion blur at wider apertures, depending on lighting and ISO speed).
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Thank you,
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Theodore.
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