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Old Mar 15, 2007, 10:54 PM   #1
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I am looking for a Quantaray 7500a flash manual. I have searched the net with no results. I can not even find a Quantaray website.

Anyone have any idea where I can find a manual?


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Old Mar 15, 2007, 11:03 PM   #2
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Wolf/Ritz camera
Quantaray is the house brand.
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Old Mar 19, 2007, 7:17 PM   #3
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I think I have given up on a search for a manual.

I am still baffled on how to work the scale that has ASA, f-stop numbers and feet. I assume I dial in the ISO, then look at how far back I am from the subject and then set the aperature. The flash also has manual and auto. There is another swithc that says "Module NK" with three colors under it; blue, yellow and green.


Is there another similar type of flash out there where I can read how to work them?


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Old Mar 19, 2007, 9:59 PM   #4
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OK -- I'll take a stab at it. It appears to be pretty straight forward from looking at the images.

That foot has a built in sensor (auto thyristor type system).

I don't think that's the module for newer Nikon models. It does appear to have a TTL setting, but I doubt it will recognize your camera settings.

You could always try it. See the switch on the left bottom of the unit when facing it's back? It's all all the way to the right now. Move it one click to the left of where it's at. That appears to be a TTL position.

With it there, go to manual exposure using a shutter speed that's fast enough not to let much ambient light in (go to around 1/100 or so) at around ISO 200, and see if it varies it's output when you make changes to the Aperture.

If the exposure looks consistant with different camera settings, it's probably recognizing camera settings (unlikely, but give it a go anyway).

If that doesn't work, switch it back to where it was (where it is in the photo now -- left bottom switch all the way to the right).

All the way to the right with the left bottom switch appears to be a non-TTL auto position. So, it should use the sensor I see on the front of the foot to measure reflected light during the exposure.

Note the 3 position switch on the right hand bottom of the unit when facing it's back (color coded)? Those are 3 different Auto Ranges you can use when in that non-TTL Auto mode. They will correspond to the distance scale you see at the top.

Take the way it's set right now as an example. The ISO speed slider at the top is set to ISO 25 (all the way to the right).

Note that the green scale now extends from about 3 feet to 16 feet with the ISO speed slider set to ISO 25 (think ISO speed when you see ASA, as ASA was an older American standard that means the same thing)?

That's the range (3 to 16 feet) you could shoot within if the camera was able to shoot that way (ISO 25), using the aperture it's telling you to use (the green is pointing to f/2.8 ). It will change with the zoom head if you pull it in or out). Note that you have the bottom right switch on green, too? That's selecting the desired range that corresponds to what you see at the top. BTW, if you're bouncing the flash, you may need to move up to a higher range (since the light is going to have to go up to a ceiling, be dispersed and bounce back down, you have to consider that as adding to the distance you're shooting from. The sensor will take care of making sure it stays on long enough though as long as you're not exceeding the capabilities of the range selected (since it's looking at reflected light coming from the front).

Of course, you don't have ISO 25 on your D50. So, f/2.8 is not the correct Aperture to use for the green Auto range on the flash if you want it to expose correctly within the distances shown (3 to 16 feet as set right now). It will probably point to around f/8 for that green auto range if you move your ISO speed up to ISO 200. The range should change with the zoom head setting, too (it appears to be a manual zoom head that you an pull in and out to match the desired coverage).

Basically, you need to slide the ISO scale to a higher value supported by your camera model (i.e., ISO 200 or higher). Then, set the ISO speed to the same value on the camera, and set your aperture to the aperture value it points to on the flash (it will move when you change the ISO speed slider on the flash).

You'll need to use Manual Exposure on the camera, setting the ISO speed and Aperture to match what the flash tells you to use for the Auto Range Selected (you select a desired Auto Range with the the color coded switch at the right bottom).

You've got 3 different ranges to give you more flexibility with your selection, especially since you can move the ISO speed slider higher or lower within the ISO speeds to get an aperture setting supported by your lens.

For example, if you wanted to pick one of the 3 ranges and it told you to shoot at f/4 and ISO 200 (just an example for explanation purposes that may not be available), and you only had a lens with f/5.6 available, if you moved the ISO speed slider to ISO 400 instead, the pointer for the range you have selected will move the aperture you can use down a stop for that range.

You'd want to set the shutter speed on the camera to a reasonable value that lets in the amount of ambient light desired. I'd probably go with around 1/100 second in most indoor lighting as a starting point. Note that shutter speed will play no role in the amount of flash seen by the camera. That's because the flash burst will be very short (usually 1/1000 second or faster). It's only used to vary the amount of ambient light seen.

Then, that little tiny hole in the front of the flash foot (it's a sensor) will measure the reflected light it sees during the exposure, and terminate the flash output when it sees enough light for the selected auto range (just match up the color code of the range selected to the scale at the top). As long as your camera and flash match up for ISO speed and aperture for the selected range, you can shoot within the distance shown on the scale for the selected Auto Range.

This type of solution lets the flash control the exposure (it's using it's built in sensor to measure reflected light and terminates it's own output when it sees enough for the selected auto range).

You've also got two manual power settings available (full or 1/16 power). But, for most uses, you'd want to take advantage of the Auto feature (not Auto as you may think of a more modern system, but Auto in that the flash is controlling the exposure by measuring reflected light during the exposure). That way, the flash is doing the work for you (as compared to a fully manual system where you'd be making changes to your aperture as your distance to subject changed). Auto modes like this make it much easier to use, since you've got a range of distances you can shoot within as long as you set the camera and flash to match for aperture and ISO speed.

This type of system also has the advantage of eliminating the need for a metering preflash that you'll have using the newer iTTL modes a typical dedicated flash would be reliant on.

One more thing... you'll probalby need to set WB on the camera to match the flash. Around 5500 degrees Kelvin would probably be about right (or you could even try a flash or daylight preset and get it close).

If exposure is slightly off, you may need to open up your aperture more or less than the flash tells you to. But, it will probably be within about a half stop as long as the camera's ISO speed is relatively accurate (not over or underated compared to it's actual sensitivity).


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Old Mar 19, 2007, 11:40 PM   #5
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WOW!!!!!
What an explanation. I was not expecting something that detailed. That helped me a lot. Thank you.

The camera will not expose (shutter button does not work) when the flash is in the TLL mode.

I need to get back and finish reading you post.

I may have another question or two after I try everything you suggested.


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Old Mar 20, 2007, 12:12 AM   #6
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A couple of other questions.

The green auto check light never seems to light up. What is it for?


I never see the small fill light flash. Does it have to be set to "fill" in some way. Maybe it is firing, but I can't see it. I did put the main flash into my camera bag to prevent my eyes from seeing it flash. The small fill definately did not fire. Maybe it needs to see the main flash before it will fire.




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Old Mar 20, 2007, 7:00 AM   #7
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There is a test button on your flash (just below the Auto Check light). If you press the test button, the flash will fire to see if it's within the distance range and able to work OK at the current Auto Range Selected (it's looking for good return light from the flash). If so, the green light should come on to let you know it will work OK that way. If not, try a different auto range, move closer to your subject, try straight versus bounce, use a longer zoom head position, etc.

The best way is probably to take a test shot of your subject in the conditions you're using it in. Then, check your shot for proper exposure, check the histogram for hot spots, etc. If it's too hot (overexposed), try stopping down your aperture (higher f/stop number compared to what the flash is set to), use a different range, lower ISO, etc. If too cold (underexposed), do the opposite.

As for the tiny fill bulb, look on the flash for a switch somewhere to turn it on or off as desired. I don't know if it has one or not (I've never seen this flash model before). It could also be controlled by something else (zoom head position, bounced or not, etc.).
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 8:53 AM   #8
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Thanks. You have explained everything very well.

Yep, you are right. With close inspection I found a hidden switch in the front, just to the left of the fill flash.
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Old Mar 20, 2007, 8:54 AM   #9
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JimC wrote:
Quote:
As for the tiny fill bulb, look on the flash for a switch somewhere to turn it on or off as desired. I don't know if it has one or not (I've never seen this flash model before). It could also be controlled by something else (zoom head position, bounced or not, etc.).
It's hard to tell from your photos. But, it looks like there may be a tiny slide type switch just to one side of that bulb.

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Old Mar 20, 2007, 8:55 AM   #10
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Oops.. I didn't see your post before I started typing. Yep... looks like you found it.

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