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Old Feb 14, 2009, 4:25 PM   #1
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Hello all.

I have a Nikon D700 w/battery grip, and am in the market for a flash bracket. Now, I don't have the funds for a really good pro-grade model, but that may not be necessary anyway. There are a number of such units available, from different manufacturers, and some allow positioning of the flash unit to be centered directly over the lens, while others take more of a 'side' approach to where the flash sits - in relation to the lens. My question is this: Does it matter a whole heck of a lot whether the flash unit would sit 'offline', or centered? I have not had the opportunity to work with one, before, so I am coming into this area really green. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

Blessings,
Nathan
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Old Feb 14, 2009, 5:40 PM   #2
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Does it matter? Yes and no.

It depends on whether it matters to you where the shadows fall.

If the flash is mounted directly above the lens and aimed directly at the subject (not bounced or used in some omni directional diffuser) then the shadows are below the objects. In most of the common "people" pictures, this would mean that the shadows are more often than not hidden by the subject themselves. When the flash is displaced left or right of the lens, the shadows are also displaced and frequently become very visible.
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Old Feb 14, 2009, 8:27 PM   #3
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dwig wrote:
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Does it matter? Yes and no.

It depends on whether it matters to you where the shadows fall.

If the flash is mounted directly above the lens and aimed directly at the subject (not bounced or used in some omni directional diffuser) then the shadows are below the objects. In most of the common "people" pictures, this would mean that the shadows are more often than not hidden by the subject themselves. When the flash is displaced left or right of the lens, the shadows are also displaced and frequently become very visible.
Thanks for responding.

Yes...I had already taken into account the 'shadowing' differences betwixt the two types of setup, but wondered if there might have been some other issues also. As I said, this is really 'green' territory for me, and I am just trying to do my best in determining the wisest way for me to travel within this matter. I have read a number of recommendations on both types, and wondered what the members, here, might feel about one over the other.

Blessings,
Nathan
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Old Feb 14, 2009, 9:09 PM   #4
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The only other significant issue would be balance. A large, heavy flash off center from a large heavy camera makes placing the bracket's grip a problem. Sometimes placing the flash outboard of the grip with the camera on the opposite side leaves the grip near the balance point, which can be a good thing. Its just a matter of personal preference and comfort.
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Old Feb 14, 2009, 9:56 PM   #5
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dwig wrote:
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The only other significant issue would be balance. A large, heavy flash off center from a large heavy camera makes placing the bracket's grip a problem. Sometimes placing the flash outboard of the grip with the camera on the opposite side leaves the grip near the balance point, which can be a good thing. Its just a matter of personal preference and comfort.

Dwig ~ thanks again.

I will share with you the two that I have seriously been considering. One, is the Manfrotto/Bogen 233B That I have been hearing raves about. An added cost would be the sync-cable, as well as an anti-twist plate (though I have read that at least one owner, of this unit, made his own plate - saving himself $15). The other one that I had been looking at is here: http://www.amazon.com/RPS-Rotating-B...79&sr=1-19.

I like the design factor of the 233B, but kinda like the other (Rotating Bracket) also. If everything goes according to plans, I have three weddings - thus far - to shoot, later in the year. I don't want to wait until the last minute to get my feet wet with flash photography. This is why I am delving into it right now. Maybe with this type of photography (weddings), the Rotating Bracket might be a better choice - seeing as how it would allow centered positioning - in vertical, as well as in horizontal setups - and, thereby, greatly reducing the shadowing effect.

Blessings,
Nathan
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Old Apr 6, 2009, 9:57 AM   #6
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altho` metal is the norm for brackets I experimented with plastic cable covers. Easy to work and can be used to cover any cables to the flash head. Here is a twin flash that I made, also using supabrite Led`s for focus assist.
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Old Apr 7, 2009, 4:17 AM   #7
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Here is another idea. The flash is mounted onto the lens barrel. The snag being it is limited to one size barrel diameter.
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Old Apr 16, 2009, 9:33 AM   #8
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Hi NLAlston,

I use a canon with the CB mini-RC. I use it for fashion stuff mainly, or when I want that direct flash look & im shooting alot of verticals, I find it simple and with no moving parts its very solid, as opposed to the brackets that flip etc. personal preference really. I wouldnt use this for a wedding, where I would prefer to mount flash to camera & bounce the flash as I would be switching between portrait & landscape shots

here is the products website:
http://www.custombrackets.com/script...?idProduct=139

here are some customer reviews from the site:
http://www.custombrackets.com/script...?idProduct=139

It puts the flash above the lens, and directs the shadows downwards and behind the subject well. The MAJOR selling point for me is that the bracket puts the flash to the user's rightside of camera when looking thru viewfinder, so when you rotate the camera anti clockwise to shoot vertically, the flash is then above, and I can easily access the vertical grip's shutter button.

I believe Canon's SB-E2 flash bracket position's the flash to the user's left of camera body, and cant be positioned to the right of the camera, can anyone confirm this is true?

My 2 cents worth, hope it helps!
Gerry

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