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Old Nov 15, 2010, 8:22 PM   #11
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I own this flash and it works very "intelligently" with my D300s and D90. It balances light between foreground and background better than my Sigma 500DG Super ever did...it's magic and I'm impressed by the results!
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Old Nov 15, 2010, 11:52 PM   #12
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ok will this flash work with the reciver and transmitor i posted about
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Old Nov 16, 2010, 7:45 AM   #13
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Buy something like a Sunpak 383 Super, 433D, 422D or 333 Auto instead if that's the way you plan on using it.

These are Auto Thyristor type flash with multiple aperture ranges as well as manual power settings, and those models have relatively low trigger voltages (and models with higher trigger voltages may cause damage to some cameras and cheaper wireless triggers). They're inexpensive of the used market (try http://www.ebay.com and http://www.keh.com).

I see a bargain condition 422D (GN 100) with a standard foot on it for $33 right now:

http://www.keh.com/camera/Sunpak-Fla...990447310?r=FE

The Sunpak 383 Super (GN 120) will cost you a bit more.

http://www.keh.com/camera/Sunpak-Fla...090385150?r=FE

Scroll down on this page and you can see how the slider positions work on a Sunpak 383 Auto (with the available apertures changing with the ISO speed slider at the top), as well as the Aperture Range position (to the left of the range scales) you select.

http://webs.lanset.com/rcochran/flash/battflash.html

The 433D has the same layout and specs as the 383 Super if you find one of those with a standard 1D foot on it.

The 422D has the same type of layout (only it's GN is 100 versus 120, so the distance ranges are different on one, depending on which Aperture Range you select). See a photo of the back of one here.

http://www.canonistas.com/foros/ilum...eos-1000d.html

Basically, you just use the sliders on the back of the flash to pick the f/stop and ISO speed you want to shoot at and set the camera to match (use manual exposure and select something like f/5.6, ISO 400 and set the flash the same way). Then select a shutter speed that lets in the amount of ambient light desired (for example, 1/100 second).

Then, when you take a photo, the flash will automatically terminate the flash burst length when it sees enough reflected light for the aperture and ISO speed you have set (the flash controls the exposure) since it has a built in sensor for that purpose.

For example, a Sunpak 333 Auto or 433D may have settings combos like these available:

ISO 100 apertures settings of f/2, f/4 or f/8

ISO 200 settings of f/2.8, f/5.6 or f/11

ISO 400 settings of f/4, f/8 or f/16

etc.

So, just pick a combo that you like and set the camera to match and let the flash control the exposure (by measuring reflected light and terminating the flash burst when it's built in sensor sees enough reflected light for your aperture and ISO speed settings).

You also have manual power settings with those models (1/16, 1/8, 1/2, full) so you can tweak the lighting yourself if desired versus using one of the 3 built in Auto Ranges.

Then, you could use it either on camera or in the cheaper wireless triggers without needing one that supports iTTL.

You lose HSS (High Speed Sync, a.k.a., FP Mode) with that type of flash, so your shutter speed would be limited to the x-sync speed supported by your camera (but, you wouldn't have that feature anyway using a wireless trigger that doesn't support iTTL).

IOW, I wouldn't spend the money for the SB-600 if you plan on using it via a cheaper wireless trigger with no iTTL support like the one you just posted a link to. I'd go with less expensive Auto Thyristor type flash models instead (and they're plentiful on the used market).
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Old Nov 16, 2010, 8:38 PM   #14
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SB-600 is an excellent flash for most uses.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 8:50 PM   #15
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ok sb600 or this strobe kit http://www.amazon.com/540W-Professio.../dp/B003UY8FAK
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Old Nov 28, 2010, 6:33 PM   #16
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You're comparing apples and oranges here. The Amazon link shows a studio strobe kit that only works close to a power plug and probably shouldn't be used outdoors. The SB600 is a portable external flash that can be used most places you can photograph safely. Each has it's own purpose for which it was designed.
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Old Nov 28, 2010, 8:15 PM   #17
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Im leaning towards the sb600 because of the portability of it and ease of use
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 1:13 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Nichol View Post
You're comparing apples and oranges here. The Amazon link shows a studio strobe kit that only works close to a power plug and probably shouldn't be used outdoors. The SB600 is a portable external flash that can be used most places you can photograph safely. Each has it's own purpose for which it was designed.
Stick with simple and what was made to work without work arounds or unecessary hassle.
Portability vs. the system you posted.
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Old Nov 29, 2010, 1:21 PM   #19
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Going with the sb600 for ease of portablitity and they make sobtboxes and stuff like that I found for this flash so im going with that
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Old Nov 30, 2010, 8:40 PM   #20
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I own 2 sb600's. Debated about 3rd party - but decided to stay with the same menu system.

Individually, excellent flash and generally on camera with full iTTL. Many accessories, such as difusers, gels, shadowboxes expand functionality. Good light output, but not at the level of the SB900, or even some of the 3rd party in the sb600 price range.

With the D3000 (like my D40) off camera with iTTL would require the SU800. A cheap semi-off camera approach but manual would be an optical slave triggered by the pop-up flash (thus not true off-camera).

I use the 2 sb600's off camera with my D90 with the D90 acting as master and dialing down the power of the pop-up which is used as a preflash. Obviously, that is beyond the capability of the D3000. For situations exceeding the triggering limitations of the Nikon system, I switch to manual and have some cheap cactus V4 triggers. The only triggers that may maintain (depending on model) the iTTL (or TTL) capabilities are Radiopoppers or Pocket Wizards, but they are more than the price of a flash.

When used in iTTL mode, the sb600s - individually or multiple - give solid even light. Manual has it's advantage as you can mold that light, bringing in but controlling shadows. It really depends on what you want to do.
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