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Old Jun 24, 2004, 4:22 PM   #1
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Anybody know where I can find a slave for a S7000so I can hook it up tomy Norman 808/LH500 series studio strobe lights?



Any help would be greatly appreciated.



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Old Jun 24, 2004, 10:53 PM   #2
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Slater wrote:
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Fujifilm S7000 TTL Slave?
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Anybody know where I can find a slave for a S7000so I can hook it up tomy Norman 808/LH500 series studio strobe lights?
Not sure about your need, bit if you want to trigger your strobe, your hot shoe does the job, no need for any "slave" (check the voltage for safe level)

If you want "TTL exposure control" with your strobe, then I don't know :|
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Old Jun 25, 2004, 8:49 AM   #3
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I need a hotshoe to strobe adapter that is TTL.
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Old Aug 3, 2004, 3:26 PM   #4
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I am trying to use the vivitar 5000 ring flash with fujifilm S7000 for close up pictures (macro function), but the pictures appear extremelly bright. The best pictures using this flash needs extremelly high speed values setting such as 7000 X f8. Even thus the pictures show redish tones. What amI doing wrong ?
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Old Aug 3, 2004, 5:25 PM   #5
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The specs says :
- one auto setting at F 5.6
- auto exposure range 1-3.1 feet

So, if you are within the range and set your camera at F 5.6, it should be fine.
It's useless to use high speed because the flash burst is very short, and it's not the way to reduce the flash light.(if you want, you can use neutral density filter)
For the tone , it's a matter of white balance. I guess forcing to daylight should be ok .
Some causes possible:
- is the aperture lower then 5.6 (open wider)?
- is the flash too close to the subject (under 1 feet) ?
- did the flash sensor is hidden?, any thing block the sensor from seeing the subject ? (it's necessary for the sensor to capture the light reflected from the subject to cut off the flash at the right moment)
- less probable but possible: does the flash always burst at full power at auto setting? check with a white wall, if the flash burst at full power , it may be defective simply.


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Old Aug 3, 2004, 5:31 PM   #6
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Slater wrote:
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I need a hotshoe to strobe adapter that is TTL.
Do your stobes connect to the camera via a PC (pin circle) connector, then they AREN'T TTL...what you need is a hotshoe to PC connector, or to be sure a Wein Safesync.

Also, when working with strobes do you want TTL? I was taught that you meter off the subject with a handheld meter (one designed to trigger the strobes), and you set your camera to what the meter says.
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Old Aug 4, 2004, 11:32 AM   #7
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Slater wrote:
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I need a hotshoe to strobe adapter that is TTL.

The easy answer, there isn't any such thing. The S7000 only has a standard flash hot shoe with a center contact, it isn't TTL. You need a hot shoe to PC sync adapter and as someone else already stated, the Wein SafeSynch is the best bet to isolate your camera from the trigger voltage of your studio flash equipment. You need to use the camera in Manual mode and set the aperture according to your flash output level.

The other alternative is to use your camera's flash to trigger your studio flash if they already have a builtin slave trigger, many do. The onboard camera flash should have an infrared filter put over it to keep it from being anything other than an invisible trigger flash. I've made my own flash filters by cutting a small piece of exposed color negative film (the dark orange part)and taping it over the flash tube.There is always a problem of heat when you cover the builtin flash with anything, that flash burst puts out a good amount of heat. Put your hand in front of the flash and fire it, you'll see what I mean.

The best bet is to use the hot shoe adapter and wire directly to studio flash.
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