Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Flash (External)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 6, 2005, 12:26 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 19
Default

45 deg is fine, but it is important to place the slave high enough so that the shadows do not show. Good luck.
pingree35 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2005, 3:39 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 229
Default

Great thread. I just read your story! I have been having the same issues. Only difference I've been shooting 15 year Birthday Celebrations which are as complicated as weddings. Yes, I am doing it for free, but no more, it costs me too much time and too much stress.

It crossed my mind to use the 420 as a slave but haven't tried it. I have a Celebration next month (my last) to shoot and think I'll give it a try.
Ctrack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 4, 2005, 2:30 AM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1
Default

[email protected]
Hariggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 2006, 1:26 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
gregg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 264
Default

wow....just read the wedding nightmare...now I have to give you my perspective as a former "wedding dj"

If the dj is a true professional, not a kid spinning top 40 music....they control everything at the reception...from the moment the first guest arrives at the reception hall until the last dance (thank you Donna Summer). Since I held the microphone, there was little a photographer could do to change my routine except taking them outside for photos during dinner. I did all intros, announcements, etc. Most photographers (along with the caterers)would come to me and ask me my game plan so everything went as smooth as possible. I worked with great photographers and ones that should never be allowed to do a wedding....ever again. After setting up the cake cutting shot (forthe photographer)with the bride and groom...and I was about to get the crowd involved he decided to move the newlyweds...no longer did they have a nice thick curtain as a backdrop....but my speaker growing out of the Groom's head. (This was the pre digital days, too...sure hope he could air brush that out))

I always thought that the photgraphers had it the best besides generally getting paid VERY well (and deserving it), they also knew what to bring and didn't have tokeep up with the latest dance craze or have the menu of music for the tastes of thebride and groom (oldies, big band, disco, etc)or lug extremely heavy equipment (try doing a wedding at famed St Pete Beach, florida's Don Caesar...a nightmare unloading at the service entrance, miles of never ending corridors and then the elevatorsto contend with).

And of coursethere was always that one guest at every weddingthat expected you to be a radio station and have every song ever written...requests that were usually somethingmost people never heard ofand certainly could notdance to and were punctuated by "what do you mean you don't have it, that's one of the greatest songs ever written?"

And then there's thatthoseocassional newlywedsthatdidn't quite get it. The reception is as much for them as it is for their guests. So what do you do when the couple is about 22 and more than half of their 200 guests are over 40 and the bride and groom surpise announce to me at thereception (and we had talked about the music long before this encounter) that they want nothing but "booty" music (their words, not mine)...I wanted to cry...because I knew this was a recipe for disaster....Unfortunately, I was correct.....I kept trying to slip in songs that i hoped would go unoticed. No such luck. I thought they were going to castrate me during Celebration (Kool and the Gang)and Crazy (Patsy Cline) even though the dance floor was packed. Well...it was back to more cuts from Yo, MTV raps volume whatever....as the dance floor emptied....and I got nasty looks and heads shaking. First the over 60 crowd left. Then the over 50...well, you can guess the rest.....after an hour we were down to about 30 people...with the exception of the wedding party, all 20 something....the bride and groom selected each song from the discs....and no matter how many hints I dropped about playing something for grandma...nothing changed.

And I didn't even get into the wedding where the caterer wanted to cut the cake before dinner so she could have all the cake slices ready in advance...I nixed that real fast (to the photographer delight, I might add)...Imagine their first dance with frosting all over his tux and her dress!

all this for about $90-100 a wedding...I worked for a dj company

I do have many memorable experiences....at the opposite end of things was a wedding were i could do no wrong...every song was a winner...the dance floor was always packed, the bride....later the groom....later the dad...all tipped me well...plus more for overtime....andI evenreceived a thank you card from them a couple of weeks later.....

so when photographers complain and they have a right to...they at least are usually well compensated in the hundreds or sometimes thousands...and deserve every penny

gregg
gregg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 2006, 1:57 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
pagerboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 483
Default

We paid big bucks for our photographer and it was worth it, if I take pictures at a party(for free) then I just upload the pics to their computer and let them worry about it.

My wife took care of the dj's fee so I'm not sure but everything went well.


Pretty sure the photographer used some remote light at the hall, all other pics where at the house(sunny day).
pagerboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 21, 2006, 8:50 AM   #16
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1
Default

gregg wrote:
Quote:
would come to me and ask me my game plan so everything went as smooth as possible. I worked with great photographers and ones that should never be allowed to do a wedding....ever again.
Quote:
Gregg, I agree, it is necessary to work with the DJ, but it is not the DJ's show, it is the Brides. A good DJ keeps things moving but respects the Brides wishes, even when it is a disaster! As you stated below on music choices.
Quote:
After setting up the cake cutting shot (forthe photographer)with the bride and groom...and I was about to get the crowd involved he decided to move the newlyweds...no longer did they have a nice thick curtain as a backdrop....but my speaker growing out of the Groom's head.
Quote:
I would never allow a DJ to set up my shot. I am the professional photographer and I'm responsible for the shot. I have had many DJs try to set up my shots and they typically are horrible. You seem to have a good eye and pay attention to detail (background, etc), but most do not. As you are in control of the schedule, music and flow; I am in control of the photos and setups....period. I have had caterers try to set up shots too, a good photographer should never compromise.
Quote:
I always thought that the photgraphers had it the best besides generally getting paid VERY well (and deserving it)
Quote:
I always thought the DJ had it best, he could screw up and the memory only fades with time. The photographer's work stayes in their face forever.
Quote:
I do have many memorable experiences....at the opposite end of things was a wedding were i could do no wrong...every song was a winner...the dance floor was always packed, the bride....later the groom....later the dad...all tipped me well...plus more for overtime....andI evenreceived a thank you card from them a couple of weeks later.....
Quote:
Yes, that's always nice. Getting a tip at the end of day is nice too.

Bottom line, work with a well respected photographer to learn your craft. Don't take on the most demanding photography job in the world without the experience needed to make it successful. This is one of the problems with the digital age and low cost, but good digital cameras. Folks are being ask to photograph situations and events, which they are not prepared to do. This is always a disaster and will typically results in bad feelings with both parties. It typically is the lowest end weddings, which are the hardest to shoot and these are the folks, which will ask their "friends" to shoot to save them money. It is these weddings that need experience and resolve to make successful.
Quote:
Sincerely,
Quote:
Brian
Nikon_D2X is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:16 PM.