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Old Sep 11, 2005, 3:32 PM   #21
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No, the sensor shown underside has a 1/4 whit female thread and the topside has the hotshoe for mounting a slave flash onto. So you can mont the assembly on to a tripod.
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Old Sep 11, 2005, 6:48 PM   #22
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geriatric-

Thanks for the correction.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 12, 2005, 9:36 AM   #23
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Thank you Sarah, this has become an excellent thread because you're actually answering my direct questions - like going on a course. THANKS

So, a slave can be mounted on a small tripod and used as a fill-in, great. And it must have direct view of the in-camera flash in order for it to shoot?

Can it be used behind a subject as a fill-in to illiminate a shadow?

What is a strobe?

NOTE: I away for a few weeks starting Wednesday but, I'll be back.
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Old Sep 12, 2005, 12:29 PM   #24
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Thanks a bunch for this discussion. I'm looking at getting a flash to use with my Panasonic FZ-20. It has a hot-shoe, so lots of people use the Sunpak 383 flash with it. I've gathered from this discussion, especially the slave flash 101 course, that I should at least check into buying a slave flash rather than the Sunpak. Also, since a slave does not run off the hot-shoe, I wouldn't have to worry about getting a flash with a voltage that's too strong for my camera. Is this pretty accurate?
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Old Sep 12, 2005, 1:22 PM   #25
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nlp/JC

Yes, using a slave flash to banish background shadows is something that I do all the time. Positioning a slave flash on a extra tripod or a light stand is no problem at all because the are many new slave flashes, like the Vivitar DF-200, where the flash portion of the flash unit rotates independently of the flash head. That allows you to have the body withits photosensor facing the on camera flash, while the slave flash's head is directed to exactly where you want it to point.

What we today, by habit, refer to generically as ," flashes" are technically speaking stroboscopic flash units. In the days when there were still single use flash bulbs, todraw a difference between single use flash bulbs and the new constantly re-useable flash units, we called the constantly re-useable flash units "strobes" and the single use bulbs, were calledeither flash bulbs, or just "flashes."

Now that single use flash bulbs no longer are manufactured, we just call, what had in the past been called "strobes", now are just referred to as flash or flashes. I hope that helps.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 12, 2005, 1:43 PM   #26
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LadyHawk-

There are huge advantages, photographically, to get the flash away from the camera. That is why we see specialized flash brackets such as the stroboframe. It is just my personal opinion, but I feel that a picture in which you use a flash, need not have harsh shadows and have the very obvious appearance that you employed a flash to take the photo. The lighting should be natural, effective, and the photo should replicate the scene, just as it is seen by the human eye.

Yes, years ago I used a camera hotshoe mounted Sunpak, Metz, or Vivitar flash. But it was very quicklyapparent to me that those photos made it very quickly and obvious to the viewer of my photos that these were "flash photos!" I did not want photos that screamed "FLASH!" Instead I wanted my photos to record the spirit and ambiance of the scene that I was recording. Take a look at the photo that I attached to my post that opened this thread, that shows what I am attempting to discuss.

Yes, as long as you can use your camera's built-in flash and a camera hot shoe mounted slave simultaneously you can easily use a slave flash and you won't have to worry about voltage compatibility.

However, I urge you to try using a slave that is more powerful than your on camera built-in flash, and to getthe slave flashaway from the camera by extending in high in your left hand, or placed on an extra tripod or light stand, and naturally pointed toward the scene you are photographing. You will be amazed at the difference in your photos.

I urge you also to use your slave for baounce lighting as well.That is also very effective lighting for great photos.

Sarah Joyce


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Old Sep 12, 2005, 8:34 PM   #27
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Speaklightly:
Thanks for your thorough response to my questions. I will definitely check out slave flashes, especially the Vivitar models suggested. Do you have any other suggestions re: models to check out?
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Old Sep 12, 2005, 8:58 PM   #28
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LadyHawk-

The two leading Vivitar flashes are the DF 120 which is quite small in size, but has good power and the DF-200 which is more powerful, larger, and has a rotating body and flash head that is quite convenient.

I also found the Bower on www.ebay.com for $49 which does not have a rotating head or body but is quite powerful and able to pick up the trip signal from the camera's built-in flash everytime no matter what the angle is. It is just 2" X 3 1/4" and is palm size, which makes it quite handy. Here is a photo of the Bower.

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Old Sep 13, 2005, 3:46 PM   #29
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Hi, I'm new to this camera thing. I hav a S2 and am looking for an extra flash. Now I understand everything you talked about the slave flash. But is there a flash that works without the hotshoe (S2 unfortunately doesn't have one) but will not need the built in flash. (ie uses a cable) If so what are those flashes called?speaklightly wrote:
Quote:
LadyHawk-

The two leading Vivitar flashes are the DF 120 which is quite small in size, but has good power and the DF-200 which is more powerful, larger, and has a rotating body and flash head that is quite convenient.

I also found the Bower on http://www.ebay.com for $49 which does not have a rotating head or body but is quite powerful and able to pick up the trip signal from the camera's built-in flash everytime no matter what the angle is. It is just 2" X 3 1/4" and is palm size, which makes it quite handy. Here is a photo of the Bower.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 13, 2005, 4:20 PM   #30
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As good as it is, the S2 has neither hotshoe or sync cord socket. So all you are left with is the onboard flash. This will be OK with a slave flash providing it does not have a troublesome preflash. If it does it may only use single flash in the manual position. So you can use that too fire the slave flash.
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