Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Flash (External)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 25, 2003, 7:46 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 3,196
Default Vivitar ring flash

Some experiences with Vivitar/Phoenix ring flash for macro?

Phoenix
Vivitar
DonalDuc is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 26, 2003, 3:12 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,162
Default

I'd like to know a bit about this as well. The 6000 series seems only dedicated, with a visually unappealing lump resembling a dummy standard gun, stuck on the hot shoe with plent of ergs, whilst the 5000 series seems more manual in output power adjustment but less ergs.

In macro shooting with ring flash, do you need plenty of flash ergs to allow small stops and greater DOF?
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2003, 2:33 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 579
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by voxmagna
I'd like to know a bit about this as well. The 6000 series seems only dedicated, with a visually unappealing lump resembling a dummy standard gun, stuck on the hot shoe with plent of ergs, whilst the 5000 series seems more manual in output power adjustment but less ergs.
The Phoenix and Vivitar 6000 seem the same thing with different names. I have had the Pheonix for sometime. It is dedicated TTL without manual adjustment. Almost all ring flashes look similar to the Vivitar or Pheonix. The Vivitar is not a dedicated flash. Either one uses in the flash manual mode and controls the exposure using camera and flash. Or, one uses the flash autiomatic mode for the flash to determine the proper illumination intensity. Thus, it is not very convenient.

My Nikon Coolpix 995 user guide has a Ring Flashes page in the External Flash section. Many examples were taken using the Pheonix.

If you are using digital camera, you might consider a ring light rather than a ring flash. A ring light is a continuous light source that permots you to see the result BEFORE taking a shoot. This is similar to the use of a lamp. The difference is that a ring light permits one to get close to the subject. Nikon has a LED-based Cool Light SL-1 whose power is kind of weak. A new fluorescent ring light is Samigon's Halo-Lisght FRL-1 with a higher output than Nikon's SL-1. This Samigon can use AC power, which is also its drawback because an adapter and wire could be a little clumsy. Check the Nikon Cool Light SL-1 page for more details. The Samigon uses the same tricks and shares the same prolem with Nikon's SL-1.

Here is the info of the Samigon: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bh3.sph/...ID=F46BD049B20

Quote:
Originally Posted by voxmagna
In macro shooting with ring flash, do you need plenty of flash ergs to allow small stops and greater DOF?
Ring flashes are usually of low power because the distance between the subject and ring flash is so short that the camera may not be able to close its aperture down to the level that can produce well-exposed images. Most digicam can only do down to approximately F11, which is still not small enough if a ring flash is very close to the subject. On the other hand, due to the small image sensor size, the DOF of a digital camera is already greater than a 35mm SLR micro/macro lens.

Hope this helps.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 user guide
shene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2003, 3:58 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,162
Default

Thanks that's VERY helpful and I hadn't appreciated the advantage of having the light 'always on' VOX.
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:07 AM.