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Old Feb 23, 2006, 11:22 PM   #1
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I just got my 2500 D flash for my Dimage Z2. What do i need to do to use it? I have it set on ttl but the pictures are coming out dark. I took one with just the onboard flash and it was much better. I bounced it off the ceiling( i think, 60 degree bounce) Whta do i need to know about bouncing and using an external flash?
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Old Feb 24, 2006, 1:17 AM   #2
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Ok i have been playing around with it in adi and ttl. Both still underexposed. I love being able to bounce it off the ceiling and not having a shadow. But either at a 90 or 45 degree angle the lighting is still to dark. What am i doing wrong? What else do i need to change on my camera? I willattach a pic. Also what is the difference in using the onboard flash and the 2500, besides being able to bounce the flash? Isn't it stronger?
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Old Feb 24, 2006, 6:22 AM   #3
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I have a Dimage A200, but have the same underexposure problem when using an add on flash. Does the Z2 have a flash compensation setting through the menu options? If it does, try boosting the flash compensation toward the + side. This works for me on the A200. As far as bounce angel goes, it has to be angled at the ceiling so that it hits your subject. The farther away from the subject, the lower the angle, and as you get closer you would have to increase the angle. If the angle was wrong you would see a gradient difference in brightness/lightness from top to bottom. The sample you posted looks like the bounce angle is ok, so try to boost the flash compensation. I find that the further away from the subject, the higher I have to boost the flash comp. Also, if you use the flash directly without bounce, you would use less flash comp. I use between +.3 and + 1.0.
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Old Feb 24, 2006, 10:05 AM   #4
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Yes i think it does. I will try that today. You have been very helpful. )
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Old Feb 24, 2006, 12:40 PM   #5
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I changed it to +2. Last night it was dark outside but i had lights on inside. Today i had just natural lighting. Looks better. not sure its as much as i thought though. will using a silver reflector help? Now off to give the dirty bunny a bath. )
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Old Feb 24, 2006, 7:19 PM   #6
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It looks considerably better, maybe a little overexposed. Keep in mind that bounce flash gives a softer effect than direct flash. You won't get the harsh shadows that direct flash gives. You can see the bunnies face is in shadow as the light from the bounce flash coming down from the ceiling is somewhat blocked by those floppy ears. Here's some things to consider when using bounce flash. (By the way, I'm not an expert, I'm just fumbling around with trial and error and read whatever I can get my hands on.)

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"You want to estimate the angle for the bounce by estimating the distance from the camera to the subject and the height of your ceiling. You want to aim the flash at the ceiling half way between the camera and the subject. As you get closer to the subject you would have to increase the bounce angle. And as you do that the bounced light will therefore be coming down on the subject at a steeper angle. As you move the camera further away from the subject you would have to reduce the bounce angle resulting in the bounced light hitting more of the face of the subject.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"I think your camera has a pretty long zoom lens. 38-380mm (10x). The 2500D does not zoom with the lens as does the more expensive Minolta flashes (3600HS and 5600HS) As you zoom to a longer focal length more light is required to get the proper exposure. I think your 2500D flash will give best resultswhen your lens is in the 35mm to 50mm range. Unless you already triedtaking your shots at the widest end of the lens (38mm - 1x), try it there at 38mm - 1x. You may have to get closer to the subject to fill the frame and get the composition you want, but I think you'll find the exposure to be more to your liking.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"One more factor is lens aperature. The lower the F number the wider the lens opening. In other words when the lens aperature is at f2.8 it lets in more light than if it were set at f11. I would think that if you have your camera in auto or P mode it will automatically set the aperature for 2.8 for indoor shots, however if you can change to A mode, aperature priority, you can select the aperature and the camera will automatically select the correct shutte speed. You couldtry to make sure the aperature is set to the lowest possible f number. Again, on your camera, and mine, as you zoom towards the telephoto end the aperature gets smaller and lets in less light.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Hope this makes a little sense.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"The great thing about digital is you can experiment without wasting film.

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Old Feb 24, 2006, 7:47 PM   #7
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Thanks!
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