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Old May 5, 2003, 9:58 PM   #1
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Default Which Nikon Speedlight Can I Use on My CoolPIX 5000?

Do I have to use a digital Nikon Speedlight to take full advantage of TTL exposure or can I use an SB-28? if I use the SB -28 are there any special settings I need to configure this flash for use with this camera?
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Old May 5, 2003, 11:29 PM   #2
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Default Re: Which Nikon Speedlight Can I Use on My CoolPIX 5000?

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Originally Posted by goushi
Do I have to use a digital Nikon Speedlight to take full advantage of TTL exposure or can I use an SB-28? if I use the SB -28 are there any special settings I need to configure this flash for use with this camera?
Virtually all newer Nikon made TTL flashes (e.g., SB-22s, SB-28, SB-28X, SB30, SB-50DX and SB-80DX) can be used with Coolpix 5000's TTL mode. You may also consider third-party Nikon TTL-compatible flashes. However, many have reported problems with Sunpak PZ5000AF. Sunpak flashes are very capable with lower price tags. If you prefer Sunpak, you might want to take your camera to your local store for a few shots. Some said the 5000 worked fine with their Sunpak unit, while some indicated the opposite.

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http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 user guide
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Old May 6, 2003, 10:48 AM   #3
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You can use all of the Nikon speedlights listed above with the coolpix 5000 in auto mode, not TTL, none of the Nikon P/S cameras are comparable with the D-TTL mode including the new coolpix 5700. Those new DX speedlights only work in D-TTL mode with Nikon D-SLRs such as the Nikon D1H, D1X or D100.
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Old May 6, 2003, 3:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected]
You can use all of the Nikon speedlights listed above with the coolpix 5000 in auto mode, not TTL, none of the Nikon P/S cameras are comparable with the D-TTL mode including the new coolpix 5700. Those new DX speedlights only work in D-TTL mode with Nikon D-SLRs such as the Nikon D1H, D1X or D100.
I must disagree. All Nikon TTL-compatible flashes can be used with Coolpix 950/990/995/4500/5000/5700 in the TTL mode. The new DX type flashes can also work with Nikon film and Coolpix cameras, because one can simply set the flash to TTL mode rather than the D-TTL mode.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 user guide
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Old May 6, 2003, 5:26 PM   #5
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You can disagree or believe whatever you want to believe, the facts remain the same, no TTL flash option for Nikon P/S cameras, period. Feel free to consult with Nikon on this issue.
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Old May 6, 2003, 10:44 PM   #6
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Technically Tuanokc is correct; However the CP5700, unlike the other cameras listed, does not have a front flash sensor and use a pre-flash pulse to measure from the same image capture CCD just before the real shot, so it is TTL. While it's true that all Nikon TTL-compatible flashes can be used with the Coolpixes, automatic exposure does not necessary mean Through-The-Lens!

One way to prove this is to take a picture with the front sensor blocked and see if the pictures are over-exposed which is a problem initially with the CP5000 when their owners covered the sensor with their finger around the grip.

D-TTL use the 'D' distance info from the removeable lenses to fine tune the TTL process (ie prioritize the exposure for that distance and not the overall exposure). There are other issues like does the flash zoom track the camera zoom as well on all the P/S?
BTW It's also clearly stated in Nikon literature that the wireless flash feature with the SU-4 will not work in TTL mode with their digital SLRs.
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Old May 7, 2003, 12:30 AM   #7
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Default Re: Which Nikon Speedlight Can I Use on My CoolPIX 5000?

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Originally Posted by [email protected]
You can disagree or believe whatever you want to believe, the facts remain the same, no TTL flash option for Nikon P/S cameras, period. Feel free to consult with Nikon on this issue.
This issue is discussed intensively on www.dpreview.com If you trust what Nikon's Coolpix support group says, you would receive a lot of misinformation because Nikon's Coolpix support group is not good as Nikon's film group. Different people may answer the same question in a conflicting way. Feel free to disagree if you still insist you are correct and many people on www.dpreview.com, myself included, are wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHL
Technically Tuanokc is correct; However the CP5700, unlike the other cameras listed, does not have a front flash sensor and use a pre-flash pulse to measure from the same image capture CCD just before the real shot, so it is TTL. While it's true that all Nikon TTL-compatible flashes can be used with the Coolpixes, automatic exposure does not necessary mean Through-The-Lens!
Technically Tuanokc is incorrect, I am afraid. If he were correct, it would not be possible for me to have the images in the TTL flash section of my 950/990/995/4500 user guide because they were taken with the flash in the TTL mode and the camera in the aperture-priority mode. Moreover, you are wrong about the 5700. The 5700, like all of its siblings, does have a flash sensor in the lower-left corner of the small flash.

When we talk about TTL flash, there are TWO fundamental factors, one in the camera that provides the timing and the other information that a TTL flash needs. In the TTL mode, the primary concern is the START signal to trigger the flash and the STOP signal to stop the firing. The flash fires when it receives the START signal and stops the firing when it receives the STOP signal. The duration between the START and STOP signals determines the flash intensity, which os only known to the camera. Therefore, as long as a flash can recognize these two signals (along with some others), it is Nikon TTL-compatible at the minimum level, and, as long as these signals are sent to a Nikon TTL-compatible flash properly, the flash does not care what type of the camera is (i.e., a film camera such as F5, F100 and N80, or a Coolpix camera such as the 4500, 5000 and 5700). This is the TTL control portion.

The second portion is metering. For film cameras, flash metering is usually referred to as OTF (off-the-film) metering. The flash light bounces back from the subject, goes through the lens hitting the film plane which is of 18% gray, and reflects to the flash sensor hidden somewhere in the mirror chamber. Then, the flash sensor measures the intensity and shuts off the flash. Because the sensor reads off the intensity of the flash illumination through the lens, this is referred to as TTL flash metering. None of the Coolpix cameras has flash sensor behind the lens, perhaps due to manufacturing cost. Instead, the flash sensor is installed elsewhere outside of the camera body. However, it does serve the same purpose as a meter sitting behind the lens (i.e., sending out the START and STOP signals). Of course, this approach has disadvantages. A major one would be what the sensor sees is different from what the camera lens sees. As a result, metering many be accurate. On the other hand, should Nikon decide to move this sensor behind the lens, the flash metering and control "architecture" is there.

In summary, one cannot say the Coolpix cannot do TTL flash because it DOES send out the START and STOP signals to control a Nikon TTL flash properly. What we can say is that the Coolpix cameras do not have TTL flash metering. Period

By the way, pre-flash means a few short and weak flash burst for establishing white balance and a preliminary flash intensity measuring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHL
D-TTL use the 'D' distance info from the removeable lenses to fine tune the TTL process (ie prioritize the exposure for that distance and not the overall exposure).
The distance information is obtained from a Nikkor AFD lens for the camera metering software to fine tune the flash illumination (or duration). However, the 'D' in D-TTL and DX is not about distance. It is about DIGITAL! Since a D-SLR camera has no film plane to perform OTF flash metering, the traditional TTL procedure does not work. Hence, Nikon came up with a new TTL flash metering algorithm for their digital SLR cameras (i.e., D-TTL), and this is the reason that D-TTL is not available on any film camera (because a film camera does not need it).

Hope this makes my point clearer.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 user guide
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Old May 7, 2003, 7:57 AM   #8
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Actually, Nikon flashes work as good in AUTO as in TTL. What do you think people used before the FE? The main advantage of TTL is in closeup/macro, and there you can use the built-in. The real advantage of dedicated flashes (usually) is focus assist illumination, and NONE of the Coolpix support it.
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Old May 7, 2003, 8:17 AM   #9
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basicly the point is if you are to delibrately purchase a nikon branded strobe like my sb28 which i use for my F5 and expect to get anything more than basic functionality out of it you would be wasting a considerable sum of money. the only camera integrated function like you said is the firing sequence start to finish. any basic strobe does that. the other more refining functions are nonfunctional. and those are the things you dropped the $$$ for.

i used my $300+ sb28 and my back then $50 vivitar interchangeably with my 990/sk900 bracket assy and they function no different.

so why would you spend the money on a nikon(panasonic) strobe?
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Old May 7, 2003, 8:56 AM   #10
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Folks,

I don't wan't to get into the debate about TTL issues here with Nikon digicam P/S cameras. All I'm saying is: Nikon said their P/S cameras were not designed for TTL flash, you can use most of the hot shoed Nikon Speedlights (DX and non DX)but they will work only in auto mode and manual mode regardless what the LCD display indicates, including the Nikon 5700.

As I said from my previous post, you can contact Nikon technical division or read the user's reports or tests from major photo magazines and find out more facts on this issue. At the meantime, I would recommend when you attach the SB series flashes to the Nikon 5000 hot shoe, take a few shots, you will findown tha t the pictures tend to over exposure with the closed subjects( anything within 3 to 5 feet from the camera position), you have to make the adjustments to get the correct exposure by using the exposure compensation buttons or use menu set up to set up to speedlight mode.

One of the other P/S camera that offers the true TTL flash mode (built in and hot shoe dedicated flash) is the Olympus 5050 and other Olympus ZLR digicams.

Cheers
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