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-   -   s5100 use in dark environment (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/fujifilm-22/s5100-use-dark-environment-65737/)

hanswagner Sep 5, 2005 1:25 AM

Hi there!

I just bought the Fuji s5100, fantastic camera so far! But I do have a particular scenario that I need some help with.

I am going to Disneyland, and I want to take lots of pictures inside the rides. The thing that I think I will have a problem with is that the rides are fairly dark inside, and they don't allow flash photography in the rides.... SO...

Are there any s5100 owners out there who have some good ideas for settings that I could use as presets for shooting in the described situation, ones that would get acceptable results? I have been trying like crazy to tweak the camera to the best of my ability, but I think that I would be better off trusting the advice of those more experienced than myself in digital photography.

Thank you for your time, I hope you can help.

Hans

:)

jphess Sep 5, 2005 8:34 AM

You might try experimenting with the "Night Scene" mode using a high ISO. But I doubt you will have a lot of success on the rides because that mode will utilize slower shutter speeds so your images will be quite blurred. Another thing to try would be 400 ISO in the automatic mode, and then try to push your images with Photoshop or Paint Shop and see what you can do with them. Either way, I doubt the 5100 will have enough "ISO power" to get many accurate images inside the rides.

MikDee Sep 5, 2005 10:07 AM

I have the S5100, I love it, but found under those conditions, you will have a blacked out EVF, & LCD. I recently picked up a smaller pocketbook camera for my wife, after seeing it used by my friend at a dark aquarium wedding, you could view the shot on the LCD, under almost total darkness, plus the awesome pics,& speed, convinced me. it is a Kodak DX7630, or the DX7440, is very similar with, 6 and 4mp, respectively, check them out,,, In fact I haven't found anything to dislike about these particular cameras!

hanswagner Sep 5, 2005 10:34 AM

Reality is slowly sinking in.... Ugh.. lol

Well, it is a great camera, but I think that I should have expected this from the start. The feedback that I am getting from my brother and my stepmom is that until I make the jump to SLR, I can pretty much expect to get limited results from a point and shoot, no matter how nice it is.

Please keep the replies coming, though, I like to hear what is going through your minds, and there just might be some secret that someone knows that we could all learn from (This is, of course, my way of expressing a faint glimmer of hope, LOL!).

Thanks again, and I will be watching for more replies!

Hans

:G

CCWKen Sep 5, 2005 10:38 PM

How dark are the rides?

You might try setting to Aperature Priority-Wide open, ISO to 400 and theEV up as high as it will go (+2 I think)and run some tests inside your home. If these rides are moving, all bets are off.

Another option may be to try an LED flashlight or illuminator. I don't think you'll get away without doing some post processing.

hanswagner Sep 5, 2005 11:01 PM

So, if I am planning to do some post editing, are there settings that go better with that plan of action?

I know that I sound like a total noob, and that's because I am, LOL!

But I do have a little bit of experience with Photoshop. So, I guess my new question is...

What settings are best when planning to use photoshop to clean up not-so-great low-light photos? What settings will at least give me something to work with later?

Thank you soooooo much for your input. I don't want tons of details, as those are the things that I should learn myself in a photography and editing class... Just the settings that YOU would use as an experienced photog would be faaaantastic!!!

Thanks again for your time and input, I really appreciate it!

Hans

jphess Sep 5, 2005 11:11 PM

I think CCWKen gave you some good advice. Try using shutter preferred mode, ISO 400, set the EV compensation as high as you can , and take some pictures around your home. The nice part about the digital photography is that it isn't going to cost you anything to experiment. Run those pictures through Photoshop to see what you can do with them .

hanswagner Sep 6, 2005 12:17 AM

Thanks for the input, will do!

I will try some of these ideas, and I will get back to this post with some results, most likely after the trip... I will need to get my feet wet again with Photoshop. If I remember correctly, it is quite a powerful (and therefore complicated) program...

Write to you soon,

Hans


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