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Old Sep 9, 2006, 7:21 AM   #1
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Hey,



I was wondering if anyone can help me.

I have a Fuji S5600 Camera, and when you zoom in on all the photos they look very noisy (I think that is the best way to describe it).

I usually shoot using all the Auto Settings (including Auto ISO).

They are all taken at 5.1MP at fine mode.

You can view one of the photos taken on my camera here: http://www.stonebridgecomputing.com.au/DSCF0216.JPG

Here is the Photoshop details of the image:

Shutter Speed: 1/45 sec

Exposure Program: Normal program

F-Stop: f/3.2

Aperture Value: f/3.2

Max Aperture Value: f/3.2

ISO Speed Rating: 400

Focal Length: 6.3mm

Metering Mode: Pattern



Any help is greatly appreciated.

Cheers,

Chris
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 9:44 AM   #2
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I would assume that you are talking about 100% or greater on your monitor screen. That is (in my opinion) the absolute worst way to judge what your camera captures, zooming in to that extent on most any digital pic will show noise , jaggies, and pixelazation, to begin with computer monitors don't have enough resolution to clearly show what the camera captures, and second with the size of the actual images from your camera you are looking at a tiny piece of a large image (a couple of square inches from something like 27"x37"). If you doubt the image resolution/output from your camera, I would suggest printing a pic at 8.5"x11" on a good photo printer and then judge your results.

Clyde
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 11:12 AM   #3
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I took the liberty of looking at your image in Photoshop. I think it is a pretty good image considering it was taken at ISO 400. I agree with the other suggestion that you need to print an 8x10 of the image and evaluate the print rather than what you see on the screen. If you want to reduce the noise I would suggest setting the ISO at 200 or 100 instead of Auto. Then your images will look better on your monitor. Of course that means that your shutter speed will be even slower. The flash on your camera is probably a little weak for being really effective for photographs such as the one you shared with us. It makes it difficult to rely on the 5600 as a primary camera for wedding photography.
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 7:17 PM   #4
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jphess wrote:
Quote:
I took the liberty of looking at your image in Photoshop. I think it is a pretty good image considering it was taken at ISO 400. I agree with the other suggestion that you need to print an 8x10 of the image and evaluate the print rather than what you see on the screen. If you want to reduce the noise I would suggest setting the ISO at 200 or 100 instead of Auto. Then your images will look better on your monitor. Of course that means that your shutter speed will be even slower. The flash on your camera is probably a little weak for being really effective for photographs such as the one you shared with us. It makes it difficult to rely on the 5600 as a primary camera for wedding photography.

Hey,

Thanks for all your feedback and suggestions.

Im not a professional photographer at all. The wedding photo that I put available for people to see was actuall my wedding in January this year.



I actually printed another photo up about a week or so ago (an outside shot, so plenty of light), and it was printed at approx 5.5x8 (could be 6x8 - cant remember and I just had to put a ruler up to the frame). However, I also printed a 8x11 (i think) of a photo that was taken with a 2MB HP PhotoSmart 912 (which is my old camera), and the quality in the HP one looked superb, whereas the one from my S5600 didn't seem that great.



Cheers,

Chris
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Old Sep 9, 2006, 8:24 PM   #5
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Don't know what to tell you. You know what you took, and you have seen the results. I guess you will have to be the one to decide if you're going to keep the camera or get something else.
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Old Sep 10, 2006, 11:52 PM   #6
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What you are describing is true of most point and shoot compact cameras. The noise will be noticable when you zoom in on a shot at ISO 400. That camera is actually a bit better than most (though some newer models are better).

In the photo posted, the shutter speed was only 1/45 with ISO 400, and the aperture open to 3.2--the widest for that camera. So there obviously isn't too much light there. That's as slow of a shutter as you would want to use handheld (and slower than I would likely be able to hold without more blur than that). If you are shooting off a tripod, you could manually set it to use a slower shutter and lower ISO.

Or, if you set it to a lower ISO (and maybe a slightly quicker shutter if you wished), it might compensate with a brighter flash, leaving the background less exposed, but still giving a sharp portrait.

The camera however, in it's default automatic setting, doesn't know if you are using a tripod, and likely assumes you want the background well exposed if possible. So it chooses the higher ISO to attempt to accomplish that. Many cameras without the higher ISO capabilities would have thus produced a much darker background in that situation; it would be more obviously a flash photo.

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Old Mar 7, 2007, 1:29 AM   #7
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Hey,

Thanks for all your feedback and suggestions.

Im not a professional photographer at all. The wedding photo that I put available for people to see was actuall my wedding in January this year.

I actually printed another photo up about a week or so ago (an outside shot, so plenty of light), and it was printed at approx 5.5x8 (could be 6x8 - cant remember and I just had to put a ruler up to the frame). However, I also printed a 8x11 (i think) of a photo that was taken with a 2MB HP PhotoSmart 912 (which is my old camera), and the quality in the HP one looked superb, whereas the one from my S5600 didn't seem that great.
Cheers,
Chris



I also have the s5600 note it is not a family camera. if your using it on auto you willl not get good results if you wont a camera for the family picnic were it just point and shot buy one of the cheap ones you have gaind nothing by buying an expensive camera and putting it on auto.
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Old Mar 14, 2007, 1:52 AM   #8
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Hey,

I just got a 5600, and i'm shocked at how bad the quality is with long shutter shots.

I just took a couple of pics around my house last night to try my first attempt at long explosures, but the results are terrible. I would like someone to comment on weather they feel the camera is faulty or weather this is just normal and expected.

I had a look at the fuji website, and it states this:

**********

PROBLEM: There is a speckling on the image
  • The shot was taken with a slow shutter speed in a high-temperature environment[/*]
  • This is a characteristic of CCD's and does not indicate a camera fault[/*]
************

Now it wasn't hot but it was a 15second explosure.

I"ll post 2 pictures taken at 5 mpixels, iso200, and magnified at 1:1 to show a 800x600 section of the picture.

ps: the white dots in the sky are not stars, they were created by the camera

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Old Mar 14, 2007, 1:54 AM   #9
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This is the 2nd pic also taken at 15second shutter duration. I did use a photo editor though, so it's not exactly what came out of the camera. I used 'auto settings' in the editor and it increased the brightness a little.


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Old Mar 29, 2007, 7:22 AM   #10
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You have to take that camera out of outo mode. By default it will use a high iso and the shots will have noise. If you are taking 15 second shutter speed shots on a tripod use iso 100 and you will have fantastic shots. This is iso 400 hand held.







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