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Old Sep 16, 2006, 8:24 PM   #1
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For anyone struggling to come to grips with the s9000/9500, a word of encouragement - don't give up. I got mine in January this year and am only now getting shots that I can feel proud of. It has taken lot's of experimentation and many flops, but just occasionally you get a picture that puts a big smile on your face.

This one shot in Macro mode @ 1/270, f.4, iso 200, program mode. I've cropped it to get it under the size limit for the website. Hope you like it.


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Old Sep 17, 2006, 10:48 AM   #2
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Nice pic Bob...... glad we don't have bees like that here....!!!

Really nice detail that shows what this camera can do.

Did you use RAW and an outboard converter or 9F.

I've been comparing 9F and RAW recently and find that the Fuji FinePixViewer converter is terrible. Fuji pushes the colour and trashes the rez. 9F looks better than Fuji RAW converted.... Use s7raw instead found on the web.




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Old Sep 17, 2006, 9:01 PM   #3
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Very Good macro! It's very nice camera (S9500) to use, if one knews allready quite much about basic facts of photografy. I've bee use much of manual setting in kinofilm-cameras (about 30 years) and I enjoy to use them with this model also. To me it's easy. This kind of camera is a great teacher to those who really want to learn this art deebly.
That s7raw -program is OK. And raw has more quality, when you can handle it right.

Good camera!
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Old Sep 18, 2006, 8:29 PM   #4
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Hi,
Thanks for the kind words. Shot in 9F mode. I've used Raw mode and s7raw but haven't noticed a huge improvement in the finished images - aside from a little more detail. But I put that down to me not really knowing what I'm supposed to be doing with the Raw file :?.

I'm waiting for delivery of the Raynox dcr-250 macro lens, and am hoping it will let me get in a bit closer without scaring away the subjects!

Regarding the bees, I actually saw one which had white 'fur' on the upper part of it's body - very wierd looking. But they didn't bother me, too busy collecting nectar before the winter arrives. Which here in Scotland will probably be in the next week or two:O

Cheers!
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Old Sep 19, 2006, 9:20 AM   #5
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Hey Bob,

Let us know the results of the add onRaynox.

If you are just previewing the comparison of the 9F and RAW on a 6x4 print, you will not see the difference. Save the RAW in non compressed TIF format and compare.

You will see the huge difference in colour push and rez. You might want to try this for the special art shots. For snappy pictures, I'll just use 9F.

I've had very good results with this camera.
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Old Sep 21, 2006, 3:55 AM   #6
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Hey bill,

Would you mind defining 'colour push' for me. :roll: It's not a term I've heard before. When you say about saving as uncompressed tiff, does this lead to you being able to print pictures at a bigger size with greater detail than you could with a jpeg?

Cheers,
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Old Sep 21, 2006, 8:49 AM   #7
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Certainly.....

What I have noticed when using the RAW to TIF converter built into the FujiFinPix program is an increase in the blue/green content when compared to RAW converted using s7raw program. The s7raw conversion looks very natural and represents an accurate representation of the subject shot. The 9F also has the push when compared to RAW. Maybe Fuji is trying to emulate the Fuji Film look.

The Fuji converter appears to also compress to TIF very severely. The final rendered size of the pic is ~4meg !!!!. (The RAW starts at ~19M and goes to ~4M)

So what could possibly be the purpose of shooting in RAW when using the Fuji converter... it doesn't make sense. The picture is not as good as a 9F shot, there's the colour push and loss of rez.

Now using the s7raw processor the ~19M shots goes to ~52M. Not sure on this, some one help me out, but I believe the pic is now channelized for each primary colour. The rez of the pic holds as expected for a RAW pic and when compared to the 9F shot, it has finer detail.

So I would expect to be able to increase the final print size over the 9F shot.

Bob, best to try this out. Using a tripod, take a shot using 9F. Put the camera in RAW, take the same shot.

In the "lab",the 9F will be thereference, convert the RAW shot using the Fuji program and a conversion using s7raw tonon compressed tif.Compare the three shots and you will see what I am talking about. You will need to review this on a monitor as you will not really see the difference on a 4x6 print.

This discovery has me thinking of shooting RAW for all critical pics and using the 9F for the snappy occasions....!

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Old Sep 21, 2006, 10:56 AM   #8
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In reality, you probably won't even be able to see much difference on your monitor. It takes large prints (8x10 or larger) to really start to appreciate the benefit of shooting in raw. But resolution isn't the only benefit. With a good raw converter you have added control over the white balance, you have added control over highlight and shadow recovery, and a number of other controls that you just don't have when working on JPEG images. Raw images are 16-bit images, and that gives you a lot more image data to work with. Another added benefit of working with raw images with a good raw converter is that if you decide you have made some errors you can restore the defaults and start over because all changes to your raw images are nondestructive. It takes a little time to understand working with raw and to begin to appreciate the benefits. Just taking a couple of pictures, one in JPEG and the other in raw, isn't going to tell you much at all.

S7raw seems to be a pretty good raw converter, especially for the price. The main reason I don't like using it is that it is painfully slow on my computer. My computer is an older model, 1.6 GHz/512 MB RAM. Maybe the program is faster on newer computers. I like using Adobe Camera Raw, which is a plug-in for Photoshop and Photoshop Elements. For me, it works much better. Adobe is introducing another product, Lightroom, which reportedly will streamline not only raw editing, but also will allow you to work with other common image formats. But the software requires more RAM than I have. My computer uses the old SDRAM and it's getting difficult to find it. And when you do find it, it is quite expensive. So I'm trying to decide whether to buy a new computer. If you have enough RAM, the program is available in beta release on the Adobe web site.

I'm sure there will be other editors that will come available as time goes on. But the problem is that the raw format is not standardized, so the software developers have to develop profiles for every model. Consequently if you purchase a very new model, you will probably have to wait for the software developers to catch up. But if you are using a Fuji camera, you will probably find yourself somewhat limited in choices because some of the developers have the attitude that there aren't enough Fuji cameras to worry about providing support.
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Old Sep 21, 2006, 12:25 PM   #9
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jphess wrote:
Quote:
With a good raw converter you have added control over the white balance, you have added control over highlight and shadow recovery, and a number of other controls that you just don't have when working on JPEG images.
Hi,
You mention highlight and shadow recovery...how exactly do you go about such a thing? Can you point me in the way of a good tutorial? Like Bill, I reckon I might try and use Raw more for those special shots, and 9f for everything else......at least until I get that 4gb CF card :lol:

Cheers,
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Old Sep 21, 2006, 12:54 PM   #10
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A lot of the "how to" depends on what raw converter you are using. Someone has posted some tutorials for S7raw, but I haven't paid attention to them because I don't use that program. I use Photoshop CS2 and Camera Raw. The best "tutorial" for Camera Raw is a book, "Real World Camera Raw with Photoshop CS2" by Bruce Fraser. It isn't a big book, but it is priceless if you are serious about shooting raw and using Photoshop. I wish I could be more helpful to you.
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