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Old Mar 25, 2007, 12:37 PM   #51
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From the South side
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 12:38 PM   #52
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Between the hills
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 12:47 PM   #53
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As always I've published the full collection on PanoramicPixel.co.uk
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 1:05 PM   #54
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I see two things that might have impacted it. First, it appears there was plenty of ultraviolet light that day (evidenced by the overall bluish cast of the distant mountains), and I suspect the Fuji sensor may be slightly more sensitive to the UV also. Get yourself a Skylight 1A or even 2A filter for the Fujilens - these are just slightly pink, and they cut out the UV light nicely. There are also "UV filters" that are either clear - those rely on a natural property of glass to absorb some ultraviolet and don't, in my experience, do much - orare a touch yellow. UV filtersdo the same as the Skylight,but I never liked how the UV filter made skin tones look vs the Skylight, which enhanced the natural pinks of skin.



Second, it appears to me the camera has just slightly overexposed the shots. Did you check out the histogram for each shot and see if the right side of the histogram was within the exposure limits and pretty much centered? If the exposure is shifted to the right on these shots it means the cameratends to overexpose slightly, but you can use the exposure compensation control and setit for a bit less exposure to easily solve that. Between proper exposre and a Skylight filter I think you'll find future pictures more to your liking.



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Old Mar 25, 2007, 1:49 PM   #55
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Thanks for that Jim.

Keep in mind that my tech knowledge in this field is currently limited. I've only recently taken an interest in understanding how photography works.

I've looked at the histogram but to be honest I'm not exactly sure how this works at the moment. I did play with the exposure settings today but it was more trial and error than actually understanding exactly how the camera was reacting to the different environments. You also have to remember that my experience thus far has been of indoor portrait photography.

I'll ask Google for some information regarding all you've said later, but any links would be much appreciated, including links to online filter suppliers.

What size haze filter would I need? And will I require an adaptor or do they just screw onto the lens?

I really appreciate your feedback
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 3:54 PM   #56
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I downloaded one of your images to look at the EXIF data, but there wasn't any. I was just curious to know what mode you used. I usually use the aperture preferred or programmed mode for landscape photography. I routinely use a -1/3 EV compensation. Sometimes I will even use -2/3 EV compensation, and I think some of your images could have benefited from the greater EV compensation. And it's always a good idea to use a skylight or a UV filter. You purchase a 58 mm filter, it will attach directly to the lens without any kind of an adapter.
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 5:55 PM   #57
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There wouldn't be any EXIF buddy, the images have been resized for the forums.

I used various settings through A, M and even tried the landscape setting. The bright sky seemed to ruin my photographs with every setting.
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 7:07 PM   #58
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I'm having problems locating the CD containing the images from my last trip to the lakes (I have so many). But here's a couple I took in Scotland last year with my P880. Notice the detail in the sky. I expected the same or better from the S9600.




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Old Mar 25, 2007, 7:09 PM   #59
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Look at the contrast and textures in this shot
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Old Mar 25, 2007, 7:54 PM   #60
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What jphess said - a 58mm Skylihgt filter will screw right onto the front of the lens, and you can leave it on all the time if you choose. Any local decently stocked camera store would have a Skylight 1A filter, they are common. Good brands are B+W, Hoya, and Tiffen. Do consider the slightly stronger 2A version if its available. Also, to avoid having the camera adjust the white balance slightly toward blue to compensate for the slightly pink filter I manually set the white balance to daylight when I'm shooting outside - thatwill help reduce the blues.



I'm sure over there across the pond you have excellent camera stores, on this side B&H Photo is widely regarded as excellent to deal with.



On the histogram, the shape of it will generally look look a wide mountain. Both ends where the histogram drops to the bottom should be inside the range - if not, detail is being lost (dark shadows are going totally black if the left side of the histogram goes outside the range, and bright details are being washed out if the right side goes beyond the limit. A perfect histogram will have the histogrambasically centered in the range. If most of the histogram is to the leftit indicates a bit of underexposure, if most is to the right it generally indicates a bit of overexposure.



Sometimes a scene is so contrasty that you cannot keep the full range inside the borders at either end - then, you must choose which to save and adjust the exposure compensation to keep one end or the other inside. GENERALLY you will get a better picture making sure the highlight details (the right side of the histogram) stays inside if you must choose.



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