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Old Jul 26, 2003, 4:33 PM   #1
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Default FinePix S602 Zoom

Hello, I'm looking at getting a FinePix S602 Zoom or something similar...
I came here to ask anyone who has experience with this camera if it is good for the following?

Low Light and Night Time Images
Action Shots

I'm only new to photography but I want to be able to grow and expand, I believe this camera has manual control of everything I might need to change, rather than modes, am I correct?

Digital zoom basically just blows the picture up, which decreases the quality of the image, am I able to use the 6X zoom without any digital zoom comming on?

The specs say that the CCD is a "3.3-million pixel Fujifilm 1/1.7" SuperCCD" then how come at this mode "2832 x 2128 (6M)" it says 6 Mega Pixels? Is this just digital zoom?

What are the thing's I might want to change as I get better with photography? I know of aperature, and shutter speed, are there any others?

Thanks!
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Old Jul 26, 2003, 5:39 PM   #2
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I love this camera for action shots. So far it takes the best wrestling photos. I am really happy and can't wait to try it out for football and basketball photos!

Also it takes great regular shots.

Here is a photo of two wrestlers.





I wish I had bought this camera before buying the Minolta Dimage 7i. That was way too complicated for me.
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Old Jul 26, 2003, 6:48 PM   #3
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Great! How well does it perform for low light shots? Have you tried?
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Old Jul 26, 2003, 9:16 PM   #4
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I've had This camera - the S602Z for about a year. I love it ! I owned Canon AE1 for about 25 years. This was my first digital.

Low light .. - it won't focus automatically well in low light - as I Understand many digicams won't. However, just switch to manual focus & adjust.

If this is a critical item to you, suggest looking at some infra red 'pinging' style cameras - Sony I think.

I thought the other good features of the S602 outweighed this weaker spot.

I don't have a good feel for how much noise is generated. But I can sit it on a mini tripod & point it into the backyard in absolute blackness with a long shutter open time & it picks up the scene like night vision goggles !!! Near daylight !

I have noticed some red fringing around bright moon shots however.

Oh .. and don't forget the full motion video ! 15 mins ona 1GB Microdrive !!
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Old Jul 26, 2003, 10:14 PM   #5
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Concernng low light action shots: the s602 has one of the most useful ISO 400 modes of any prosumer model digicam. BUt the camera should be used in SOFT sharpen mode and image post processed, otherwise the cameras terribly over-aggressive built in sharpening will make matter worse.

Concering 3mp-6mp issue:

The s602 uses a diagnol array, unlike other cameras. The captured data is at a 45 degree differential to the standard formats of files/monitors,e tc. that are in v/h 0 degree orientation. In order to presever the added v/h resoluton benefit of a diagnol array without data loss, the 3+mp of data is tranposed to a 6mp file with interpolated pixels inserted into the grid making the differenc to create a v/h file.

Here is a simplistic interpretatino:

X=data, 0=interpolated data,

SuperCCD data, as collected raw:

X X X X
_X X X
X X X X

Interpolated file, converted to standard HV format:

X0X0X0X
0X0X0X0
X0X0X0X

It is not a simple matter of shifting pixels uniformly every other line as one migy immediately presume. This would result in modulated distorions of the image. The 3mp mode of the s602 is actually a downsampled version of the 6mp file. As a result, the 3mp file has less measured data then the 6mp file. The 6mp file has a measured extinciton resolutoin of 13-14% higher linearly(v/h single plane) then the 3mp downsample file at extinction point. This is confirmed, such as by the controlled resolution tests available at imaging resource of both modes.

-Chris
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Old Jul 26, 2003, 10:30 PM   #6
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Thank you all for your input, I have decided to go ahead and start saving up for this particular camera With tons of info from here, Steve's review, Imaging Resources review, and samples at pbase.com I have found that this is exactly what I want. It's got a nice zoom and has the ability to go on either pre-set modes or full manual exposure, which is great!

From Image Resources review:
"A great camera to start with and gradually grow into."

And above by me
"I'm only new to photography but I want to be able to grow and expand"

Thanks again!
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Old Jul 26, 2003, 11:08 PM   #7
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Default Unsolicited advice

Explicit - If you do decide to get the s602, here is some basic starter infromaton I copied from a reply i made to another poster a while ago that 'may' help you with it at first:

--------Begin--------

Jeff CCC - Congratulations on your new purchase.

Here is a C&P of my reply to another poster concerning this:

Frols - Since you asked for additional tips, i will provide some that are based mostly on my subjective preferences. But, they may help you.

(1) Never use AUTO mode, unless you don't care about capturing a high quality image. AUTO mode forces incamera sharpening on you, and you can not even control shutter or aperature the least bit.

(1) Learn your camera's meter behaviour! The s602 i have found objectively, to have more lattitude then other prosumer cameras in dyanamic range. However, the meter is a little bit 'stupid' at time, per say. Learn at what point on your LCD/EVF the preview images correspond to a blowout roughly. This is a trial and error process, since the EVF/LCD can not begin to show the dynamic range of the s602. BUt you can roughly correlate the way the EVF displays an image realtively as a guide. The histogram is not very useful for many shots, so i pretty much ignore this. If you are not sure about the hilites in a scene, underexpose by a 1/2 stop or little more. Their is plenty of data in the lower midtones/shadows to bring back out with a levels change in post process. I use negative exposure compensation for almost every shot, due to the meter's tendency to overexpose.

(2) Adjust your EVF/LCD screens brightness! At least my unit, the default settig was horrible. The EVF or LCD adjust seperately. CLick the EVF/LCD button to view through one or the other. The one you adjust while viewing is the one that will be effected. Hold down the SHIFT + DISPLAY buttons at the same time and you will have a menu pop up with the option to adjust brightness. On the EVF, I keep it adjusted tothe 1st or 2nd mark on the left.

(3) Purchase a 55-55mm adapter tube and uv filter to keep on the camera at all times. The telescoping lens is the most susceptible part on the s602 to damage. You will need a 55mm lens cap too, as the 602's cap will not fit the tube. You can purchase a generic tube, uv filter and lens cap for less than $30 including shipping from either www.2filter.com or www.cameragear.com. I recommend these two, because i purchase from them often and have not *yet had any problems.

(4) Get an external flash. The built in flash is next to useless, if you want good fill. Get a flash with adjustable angle/swivel and consider getting a diffuser dome for it(www.omnibounce.com). Note: you will have manually white balance, the AUTO mode when using a flash on the 602 will produce a strong color cast in most cases.

(5) Get used to manually white balancing! The built in presets are not very accurate in most cases. Even the daylight one is usually useless IMO. Consider that varoius pollutants, position of teh sun through a distance of atmposphere, etc. are all variables tha effect teh light temperature. A pringles potatoe chip lid diffuses light well, and is a reather nuetral color material. Holding this over the 602 and pointed at the primary light source will provide you with pretty accurate white balances. Or you can purchase a white balance tool such as the expodisc(www.expodisc.com).

Additionally, you might want to consider a 55mm screw on lens hood to reduce glare/flare spots in bright sun, etc. also purchasable from the above places cheaply.

As far as other considerations, be certain to see my website, especially this link:

http://www.linaeum.com/productinfo/d...les/index.html

Any additonal questions are welcome.

Good luck!

-Chris
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 2:21 PM   #8
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Thanks alot WmAx for all the knowledge you have shared with me! I really appreciate it.

About the adapter tube and UV filter, what will the UV filter do for me, besides protect the lens?

And I see there is a variety here: http://www.cameragear.com./uv.asp

Will a Hoya Green Label be that much different than the much more expensive Hoya SMC Pro 1?

And the Omni Bounce link you supplied didn't have anything to do with photography I don't think.
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 4:11 PM   #9
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Explicit - THe UV filter in normal alitudes usually only protects the lens. BUt i believe this is an imprtnat thing! In very high alititudes that atmosphere may not have completely absorbed UV radiation, which can have some effect on the photographs(usually a haze effect).

The difference between UV filters that is important is the coating. A good multi coating reduces glare effects. The Green lable lens i do not recommend, it uses a grade of glass that is not unlike that used in common house windows(green glass) in that it has high level of impurities. That filter also has no useful anti glare coatings. Any multicoat filter should do. I use Hoya HMC, it works fine, though it has a bit more fragile coating then some other UV filters. You should use a specific mutli-coat safe lens cleaner on such glass, as normal lens cleaner has been rumored to damage some coatings. 2filter.com carries a good multi coat cleaner. I also recommend the microfiber cloth they sell.

The OmniBounce is a dome that attaches to external flashes to provide more diffused direct light for a softer effect.

-Chris
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Old Jul 27, 2003, 5:00 PM   #10
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So is the adapter tube necessairy?
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