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Old Jun 13, 2007, 8:37 PM   #21
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this seagull was about 25 feet out in the water on a rock,

took it in auto and zoomed in some but not full,just enough i think to try get a nice closeup.

see how awful it is.


mtclimberthe shot you took of the gull is spectacular compared to my misserable shot of a gull.
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Old Jun 13, 2007, 8:44 PM   #22
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ok,got carried away.had to post this shot.



not a great shot,not as sharp as i,d hope for,but still had to post it.
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Old Jun 13, 2007, 9:24 PM   #23
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CoolD-

Thanks for posting the two pictures. Let's deal with the first photo, the seagull. My guess is that you were in "Automatic." The photo is much too light in tone because it was over exposed. Instead of using "Automatic" use P for "Programed Automatic where you have much better control of exposure.

Where was the ISO set? I like to use ISO Ranges. Therefore, I would have set the ISO to "Auto(400)" as there was no action in the photo. This allows the S-700 to set the needed ISO automatically, but not to exceed an ISO setting of 400. My guess is that the ISO range was either on "Auto(800)" or set to a fixed ISO number that was too high for the photo environment, thus adding to the over exposure problem.

Remember CoolD, you are in control of the S-700 camera and you should set some limits on the S-700.

The second photo is next- that is the duck ducking his or her head very quickly underwater. The photo is blurred because the shutter speed was not fast enough to fully stop the duck's action. When you take your photo in the "P" for Programed Auto Mode, you will be able to see either on the LCD screen or the EVF, depending on which you are using, the actual shutter speed and aperture the S-700 is going to use for your photo.

Shutter speed is directly dependent on the ISO setting. So, in normal daylight situations, use "Auto(400) for normal shooting where there is no real action." For action shots, use "Auto(800)."

And finally, the biggest thing that causes blurring is camera movement. The S-700 camera must be rock steady when you depress the shutter button to take a photo.

Sarah
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Old Jun 13, 2007, 9:50 PM   #24
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CoolD-

Let deal with the photos that you took this evening (06/13).

In the photo of the drake, there is a bit of camera movement and some under exposure. When you are shooting in the evening, particularly the late evening, you are going to have to use some Exposure Compensation to add a little light to the photo because the sun is so low on the horizon. Another thing that I would do is to move the sharpness up to the "hard" position in the Set-up Menu, because you seem to like a lot of sharpness.

In the two macro shots, you should have used the Super Macro Mode. Take a look at S-700 handbook on page 66. Super Macro is to be used in a range of about 1/2 inch out to 3 feet..

Finally now a question for you, CoolD. Are you post processing your photos? That can also make a measurable difference in the final appearance of your photo. This is what your photo of the drake looks like after a little pp. if I had had the origianla photo it would have looked much better. However, this will give you an idea whay pp (post processing) can do for a photo.

Sarah
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Old Jun 14, 2007, 10:45 AM   #25
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mtclimber wrote:
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CoolD-

Let deal with the photos that you took this evening (06/13).

In the photo of the drake, there is a bit of camera movement and some under exposure. When you are shooting in the evening, particularly the late evening, you are going to have to use some Exposure Compensation to add a little light to the photo because the sun is so low on the horizon. Another thing that I would do is to move the sharpness up to the "hard" position in the Set-up Menu, because you seem to like a lot of sharpness.
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In what mode should i have the cam in to set the Exsposure Compensation? and is that the +/- ------+----- thingy?
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In the two macro shots, you should have used the Super Macro Mode. Take a look at S-700 handbook on page 66. Super Macro is to be used in a range of about 1/2 inch out to 3 feet..
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Yup i have/had it set to Super Marco
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Finally now a question for you, CoolD. Are you post processing your photos? That can also make a measurable difference in the final appearance of your photo. This is what your photo of the drake looks like after a little pp. if I had had the origianla photo it would have looked much better. However, this will give you an idea whay pp (post processing) can do for a photo.

Sarah
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What is post processing ? Where on the cam do i do that,and in what Mode? PS: what program did you use to edit the drake photo,wow it did a fine job.
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Old Jun 14, 2007, 11:30 AM   #26
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CoolD-

Thanks for your post. Yes, as the sun gets lower and lower on the horizon, the light from the sun is actually decreasing rather rapidly. That is why a bit of plus Exposure Compensation was needed in the photo of the drake.

Exposure Compensation is explained on page 64 in the S-5700/S-700 handbook. Your exposure in the photo of the drake cast his eye and headcompletely into the shadows. That is a common fault and you should not feel badly. Instead learn from the experience. By adding a bit of light with Exposure Compensation we would be able to see his eye and the feather detail in his head. I would personally add about EV +0.7 to begin with and then I would see how that looked on the S-700's LCD screen. Just to be sure, I would probably increase the Exposure Compensation to EV +1.0 and take the final photo.

In the case of your macro shots, if you did indeed have the macro mode set in Super Macro, then the blurriness was caused by camera movement. It is especially difficult when you are using the LCD screen to frame your photo, and you have your arms extended. It is only natural that your arms go up and down a bit, especially as you depress the shutter release. Macro photos are ideally taken using a tripod because in most cases the subject does not move. A tripod guarantees sharpness, providing the exposure is correct.

Post processing of your photos is done with photo editing software. It is usually done on your computer, although a rathersmall amount of photo manipulation is possible inside the S-700 camera. If you go to www.google.com you can download a free copy of Picasa 2. It is a very able piece of software, and that is a good place to begin to learn photo editing. A logical question might be, why should I post process or edit my photos. The answer is that how you make them look their very best. It adds polish to your finished photo. Some of the most common and easily done techniques of post processing or photo editing are cropping your photo. Adding or reducing brightness or contrast to your photo. Straightening your photo so it is level for your photo's viewer, and not distracting, etc, etc. Did my post processing of the photo of the drake enhance the photo, CoolD? If you thik that it did, then you do understand the advantage of postprocessing.

Picasa 2 is just the beginning, there are many more advanced programs that can do substantially more to improve your photos.

Sarah
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Old Jun 14, 2007, 12:03 PM   #27
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It seems that you have to take a lot of care keeping the camera still as possible when light is anything other than optimal. This photo of a moth in our backgarden I took at early dusk, and it was very difficult keeping the camera steady enough. However, as long as I braced my arm against something solid it was acceptable. I used the Shutter priority setting and made sure the speed was above 125th.

CoolD - have you checked your settings in the playback menu (press the +/- key) to find out how fast the shutter was firing on the blurred shots?
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Old Jun 14, 2007, 4:09 PM   #28
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Steve-

That is a great macro photo. I have often used the very same trick of bracing against whatever is available to stabilize the shot. And using the Shutter Priority was also a good idea.

Thanks for posting!

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jun 14, 2007, 6:34 PM   #29
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Cool,

You have me perplexed with this one...fill me in - all of your pics are entitled, 'cropped...' Are they cropped? If so, to what extent? What software did you use to crop them? Cropping can reduce the quality of your images substantially, and they look like they are cropped.

Your settings are all over the place...obviously, you are struggling to find the right combination to get a good picture. Do yourself a favor - only change one variable at a time, until you learn what effect that variable will have on your pictures. Changing 5 or 6 settings will only bury you in a sea of confusion.

Rather than try to evaluate all of the pics you posted, let's stick with the mallard. The EXIF data indicates your focal length was 175.3mm...that's not possible - your camera only goes up to 63.3mm. The only thing I can think of is that you used digital zoom - did you? Digital zoom is the same thing as in-camera cropping - it will degrade your image quality.

If you cropped this pic, and you still have the original saved, try resizing and reposting.

the Hun


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Old Jun 14, 2007, 9:41 PM   #30
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rinniethehun wrote:
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Cool,

You have me perplexed with this one...fill me in - all of your pics are entitled, 'cropped...' Are they cropped? If so, to what extent? What software did you use to crop them? Cropping can reduce the quality of your images substantially, and they look like they are cropped.

Your settings are all over the place...obviously, you are struggling to find the right combination to get a good picture. Do yourself a favor - only change one variable at a time, until you learn what effect that variable will have on your pictures. Changing 5 or 6 settings will only bury you in a sea of confusion.

Rather than try to evaluate all of the pics you posted, let's stick with the mallard. The EXIF data indicates your focal length was 175.3mm...that's not possible - your camera only goes up to 63.3mm. The only thing I can think of is that you used digital zoom - did you? Digital zoom is the same thing as in-camera cropping - it will degrade your image quality.

If you cropped this pic, and you still have the original saved, try resizing and reposting.

the Hun

i didn,t use the crop feature, i used the resize feature,and for now i,m using MS PictureIt 10 to resize.
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the resize i used: Pixel dimensions width 815 x height 611. i only renamed my pics as cropped for my own use,but they are actualy resized. this i did to meet the size requirements to post pics in this forum.
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and you folks were correct in telling me alot of my problem is coming from camera shake,my inability to hold my cam steady enough. lol i try so hard to get my shake unser control,but do struggle with it terribly,i am a shakey person in general but am working hard on this. i like to take shots of anything and everything and i take my photos on inpulse,if i see something i click the camera,subject for a shot does not matter to me,just love to shoot anything.
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yup i was using digital zoom because i love catching shots that are far away and unexspected,you wouldn,t believe the kick people here get out of shot i take when catching people/thinhs off gaurd as a far distance. but i certainly did not know that digital zoom is the same as in cam cropping.
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Now if anyone finds where to purchase a LCD Protector and a skylight filter please let me know. i can,t keep my LCD from getting fingerprints from my handling the camera. I'm in Canada( Nova Scotia)
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All of you keep on me, i,m learnig from your help,don,t give up,i love you all for putting so much into helping me. Whenever you see a photo posted by me,please comment,critazize,tell me my mistakes,and giude me i,m open to all the help your willing to give me. With your help i now have confidence to try again. Thank You All so much
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