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Old May 30, 2007, 2:54 PM   #1
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Can anyone me on how to attain the best results when shooting in low light with the 6000FD? I have shot numerous dusk and sunrise shots using the auto mode, none of which have turned out well.

I also have a UV filter and circular polarizer and need advice on when to use them.
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Old May 31, 2007, 6:44 AM   #2
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I use the Aperture priority mode, then adjust the ISO as low as I can get it and still get good exposure. The s6000d is a "low-light champ," but noise increases as the ISO goes up. If you have to use ISO 1600 or 3200 to get good image detail, expect to have to use some noise reduction software in post processing.
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Old May 31, 2007, 9:24 AM   #3
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Use your polarizer when shooting reflective surfaces such as glass and water, and use the uv filter to protect your lens !
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Old May 31, 2007, 10:20 AM   #4
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As Trojansoc suggested try Aperture priority and a low ISO Use a tripod if you can.

UV filters are made to reduce atmospheric haze but as Praxis pointed out many people leave them on their lenses at all times to protect them from dirt and scratches. Just remember to remove it when using another filter or Aux. lens.

Polarizers are made to reduce reflections in glass etc. just turn the filter until you see a good result. They are also used to increase the richness of colors and can deepen a blue sky. Again just turn the filter until you see a good result.
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Old May 31, 2007, 11:18 AM   #5
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I think the best way to reply to the OP, would be to first see what "none of which have turned out well" means.

jd...post a couple of these pics, so we cansee where the problem lies.

the Hun


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Old Jun 11, 2007, 8:59 AM   #6
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I certainly agree with Rinnie-

The Fuji S-6000 is very capable in a low light environment. The sample photo attached was taken using ISO 800. It was hand held, and no flash was used.

We would be happy to help. A photo sample would be very helpful, as we could see what went wrong.

Sarah
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Old Jun 12, 2007, 10:06 AM   #7
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mtclimber wrote:
Quote:
I certainly agree with Rinnie-

The Fuji S-6000 is very capable in a low light environment. The sample photo attached was taken using ISO 800. It was hand held, and no flash was used.

We would be happy to help. A photo sample would be very helpful, as we could see what went wrong.

Sarah
Wow that Fuji S6000fd sure takes nice sharp pictures, i am trying to sell my S3 IS and then buy the S6000fd
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Old Jun 15, 2007, 10:57 PM   #8
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Hercules-

Yes, I agree, the S-6000/S-6500 is a very capable and impressive camera. Here is another very similiar shot, but this one was taken with the new Fuji S-5700/S-700 camera.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jun 16, 2007, 1:52 AM   #9
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mtclimber wrote:
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Hercules-

Yes, I agree, the S-6000/S-6500 is a very capable and impressive camera. Here is another very similiar shot, but this one was taken with the new Fuji S-5700/S-700 camera.

Sarah Joyce
Nice mtclimber, i sold my S3 IS and think since i already have a dslr 400D maybe i should just buy a smaller f31fd as a back up
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Old Jun 16, 2007, 2:10 AM   #10
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I did this with a Fuji S9100, which is not as good in low light as the S6000:

1. I took a picture of the downtown area in Seattle in automatic mode. It was about 40 minutes before sunset, so the sky turned out quite light. Clear, but not impressive.

2. I took a mental note of the shutter speed and aperture readings, and then put the camera into manual mode. I started out with the same settings as in automatic, then increased the shutter speed. So I went from 1/100 to 1/150 to 1/200 (I cannot remember the exact shutter speeds, but, anyway, I took about 10shots with increasing shutter speeds). Then I played with aperture settings, too. What had been mainly a very pale blue turned into a darker blue, then a purple when red edges. This all kind of happened by accident, but the pictures because much more interesting color-wise and more beautiful, I think.

Anyway, check it out. What the camera produced at those faster shutter speeds wasn't what the naked eye saw, but it looked more attractive to me.




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