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Old Sep 19, 2003, 3:12 AM   #1
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Default Fuji s7000 test pics

http://www.pbase.com/tigadee3/fuji_s7000_test_shots


Here are some of the first test pics taken with Fuji's new s7000.

I don't want to be a pain in the *ss, but having just returned my s5000 for not bein gall too happy with its image quality, I cannot block the thought that these pictures (when looked at in "Original" size) are again not quite what I had in mind coming from a +6 MP camera.

But be the judge of that yourself.
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Old Sep 19, 2003, 4:14 AM   #2
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I already saw all the discussions on Dpreview.com's Forums. If you read all the threads you would have noticed that it was a PRE-production camera, and the guy who took them had no idea how to set things up in the camera.

What exactly would be "quality" for you?

For instance, my old Canon A40 was the *best* quality 2Mp could be. And now my Fuji S5000 delivers more.

I think what you need is a DSLR directly.

Just for my curiosity, what do you want to do with the pictures? View them on screen (fit on screen or zoom out) and occasionally print up to A4 posters, or view them always at full size just to count the pixels and print A3 posters?
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Old Sep 19, 2003, 6:29 AM   #3
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I think you are having some trouble with the metering. But I'm not sure what you can do about it.

This image of the sky is very underexposed.
http://www.pbase.com/image/21408283
This is because the camera saw the white clouds and compared it to an 18% gray card and saw that it averaged out too bright. It, like any other spot metering camera set the camera to underexpose the shot.

This shot of Malaysian currency is very finely detailed.
http://www.pbase.com/image/21405548
You can see how the fibers lay in the original sized picture. I did notice that there seemed to be a little bit of pixelization showing in the grain of the fibers, but without seeing the original subject, it's hard to tell. The JPEG chunkiness seen in other cameras is not evident in this camera.

The super macro shot begins to show some serious grain.
http://www.pbase.com/image/21405547
However, how much of this is due to camera shake is not determinable.

In the night shot I don't know where you metered on, but the sky is very black. Very nice job.
http://www.pbase.com/image/21405542

For a 2MP shot in low light, this one of your friend is really excellent and sharp.
http://www.pbase.com/image/21405541


I think trying those macro and night shots again with a tripod may give a better idea as to the capabilities of the 7000. In the pictures that are sharp, the lens is razor sharp. I'd hold off passing judgement on it just yet.

I do worry about that underexposure during bright scenes, though. It seems that the camera is not making the right metering decision here. If all bright scenes are underexposed this way (all of your outdoor shots seem cloudy), there may be a significant problem.
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Old Sep 19, 2003, 7:18 AM   #4
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Those are not our pictures, Lauren
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Old Sep 19, 2003, 9:23 AM   #5
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I am only comparing them to cameras that cost about as much as the Fuji (in the Netherlands that is):

The Fuji s7000 is 750 euros, but pictures of the Sony F717 (775 euros), the Olympus C5050 and 750 (both 675 euros), the Canon G3 (610 euros) and Nikon's CoolPix 5000 (710 euros) appear to be better in quality and noise. These are all below-6MP cameras.

Just to be on the safe side :

This is just my personal opinion. My taste in photography is not met by either the s5000 (450 euros) or the s7000.

These are cameras that offer a great deal of options and features for the buck, but I believe them to be put in at the expense of picture quality. As I do not need all these functions (as 10x zoom), I will probably be better of buying a camera that offers a better image quality, along with easy operating.

Just look at the pictures and decide for yourself whether or not you would like to spend your money on one of these cams. I think that some pictures look fairly well, but others are noisy and just not sharp.

It might be that the final production version has better image quality over this pre-production camera, but my experience with the s5000 leads me to believe otherwise.

I also do not think that I should immediately buy a D-SLR, other cameras at the same price can produce better quality pictures, the Canon A70 (360 euros), among others.

PS

The Fuji F700 also scores below expectations on dpreview. It's image quality is again not good.
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Old Sep 19, 2003, 6:55 PM   #6
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I think you will find that once this camera comes out it will be superior to those you mentioned. Fuji Super CCD is noted for much higher dynamic range then the competitors, but their in camera sharpening alogorithyms aren't the best. It is well documented that Fuji's CCD produce the ultimate when set to SOFT SHARPEN MODE. Look at the S602, a 3.2mp cam that competes with 4-5 mp cams.
I have viewed these pictures you posted and will agree with others that this, like the S602, is not a beginners cam. It takes time to get use to and Auto mode "WILL NOT" give you the quality it is capable of as the Sharpen Modes in Auto default to Normal sharpen. The SP modes also default to the sharpening mode Fuji thinks is best for that type of image i.e. Soft for Portrait mode, normal for sports mode, and hard for landscapes.... (that is why sharpening is not adjustable in those modes)
We'll have to wait and see once it is the hands of an experienced S602 users.
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Old Sep 20, 2003, 7:58 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvin V
I am only comparing them to cameras that cost about as much as the Fuji (in the Netherlands that is):

The Fuji s7000 is 750 euros, but pictures of the Sony F717 (775 euros), the Olympus C5050 and 750 (both 675 euros), the Canon G3 (610 euros) and Nikon's CoolPix 5000 (710 euros) appear to be better in quality and noise. These are all below-6MP cameras.

Just to be on the safe side :

This is just my personal opinion. My taste in photography is not met by either the s5000 (450 euros) or the s7000.

These are cameras that offer a great deal of options and features for the buck, but I believe them to be put in at the expense of picture quality. As I do not need all these functions (as 10x zoom), I will probably be better of buying a camera that offers a better image quality, along with easy operating.

Just look at the pictures and decide for yourself whether or not you would like to spend your money on one of these cams. I think that some pictures look fairly well, but others are noisy and just not sharp.

It might be that the final production version has better image quality over this pre-production camera, but my experience with the s5000 leads me to believe otherwise.

I also do not think that I should immediately buy a D-SLR, other cameras at the same price can produce better quality pictures, the Canon A70 (360 euros), among others.

PS

The Fuji F700 also scores below expectations on dpreview. It's image quality is again not good.
Did you ever thimk it might be time to upgrade your monitor? What brand and model are you using?
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Old Sep 20, 2003, 9:46 AM   #8
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http://www.mykamera.com/gallery/gall...iew=fuji_s7000

for some more test pics of the s7000, which I believe to be better in quality than the ones I previously posted, but notice the abnormalities in colour around the tops of the skyscrapers, they are surrounded by a purple aura.

btw, I have a Hitachi CML174SXWB 17" TFT monitor @ 1280x1024, its native resolution. I also own a IIyama Vision Master 454 Pro CRT 19", set @ 1600x1200.

I do not think that my monitors are a factor here, Goofas.
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Old Sep 20, 2003, 11:59 AM   #9
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Just a thought on the monitor. Just one other question.....why do you continue to bash cameras you are NOT going to use? We could all type here on this forum all day long about negatives. Constructive criticism is good.
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Old Sep 20, 2003, 7:44 PM   #10
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Even a Iiyama 21' monitor can have dislay flaws....

Melvin, I agree with Goofas and want to add, we got the message of you being disappointed. If you are looking for the perfect digital prosumer camera, you will not find it this or next years. Even cameras with film are known to have some lens flaws if it is a zoom attached to the body....Slr is an option. Near perfect zoom lenses start at $700 and weight roughly 600 gr or more. However the great output quality, the user will also be more restrained by total equipment weight and value. Ergo summ; Pick a camera not only by highpoints but also on handicaps, and be happy with it.
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