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Old Mar 27, 2008, 9:42 PM   #1
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I have an S8000fd and I shoot it in 8 MP (high quality) setting. The problem is when the shots are taken, the file size is usually around 3MP. I don't understand why. I shoot in P mode so I can lock in the ISO at 64. My shots are nice but I would prefer a bigger file size. Any suggestions? Here's an example:

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Old Mar 27, 2008, 10:44 PM   #2
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I looked at the EXIF data for your photo. It's a full-size image as far as the number of pixels is concerned. But it is being compressed to a level of 6. If that relates to anything close to what Photoshop does, that type of compression would be translated to "medium" quality. And that would explain why the file size is as small as it is. I don't know anything about the 8000. My cameras allow me to set quality as "Fine" or "Normal" and I think there is another one, but I don't know what it is. If I recall correctly this setting mainly controls the amount of compression that is applied to the image when it is saved. On my two cameras the adjustment is made on the "F" menu. I didn't see any indication in your EXIF data of a quality setting. So this is something you will have to check out with your manual.
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 10:53 PM   #3
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Thanks for the reply...you wanna see a pi$$-poor written manual..check out the one for the 8000! There are 2 8MP settings; I chose the one with the lowest number of pictures and corresponding highest quality (or so I thought). I'm still not sure what gives??
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 10:58 PM   #4
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OK, I looked at the specifications for your camera. After doing a little math I was able to determine that you are shooting in the "Fine" mode, and the size of your files is typical. Perhaps Fuji chose to apply aggressive compression in order to store more images on a card. On my cameras I have shot in both the normal and fine settings, and I have found that it is impossible to see the difference in normal sized prints. If your file size was larger it wouldn't produce a larger image. So, personally, I don't believe you have anything to be concerned about.
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 11:29 PM   #5
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I agree with jphess. This camera has no RAW mode, so shooting at Fine JPEG is the best you can do. If you have some really big prints made or do heavy crops and notice some JPEG compression artifacts, there is software available that claims to clean that up. But, under most circumstances, I don't think that you have to worry about it.

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Old Mar 27, 2008, 11:35 PM   #6
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jphess wrote:
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OK, I looked at the specifications for your camera. After doing a little math I was able to determine that you are shooting in the "Fine" mode, and the size of your files is typical. Perhaps Fuji chose to apply aggressive compression in order to store more images on a card. On my cameras I have shot in both the normal and fine settings, and I have found that it is impossible to see the difference in normal sized prints. If your file size was larger it wouldn't produce a larger image. So, personally, I don't believe you have anything to be concerned about.
I always thought that the larger file size equates to better quality image...the whole reason for getting a larger MP camera.
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 11:48 PM   #7
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Your photos are 8 MP in size. It isn't the size of the JPEG file that determines the size of the image. The JPEG file is just a container. The JPEG format is quite popular because it compresses the image when it is saved. That doesn't make the image any smaller. It just packs that image into a smaller container. Look at the EXIF data for your image, or any image that you have taken. The pixel dimensions are there. Go ahead and multiply them out and you will see that you have your 8 MP image. It's just that the JPEG file format kind of works the same way as the ZIP file format. Have you ever noticed how heavily text documents can be compressed? That is what the JPEG file does to your image. The JPEG file is not your image, but rather the container that holds the pixels that comprise your image. The size of the JPEG file is not related to the number of megapixels at all.

Let me illustrate in a little different way. I have a Fuji 9000. It takes a 9 megapixel image. When I shoot in the JPEG mode, with a setting of Fine, the camera stores those 9 million pixels in a JPEG file that is about 4.5 MP in size. All the pixels are in that JPEG file, but they have been compressed to conserve disk space. When the JPEG image is opened for viewing or for editing in Photoshop, the pixels are uncompressed and presented.
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Old Mar 28, 2008, 12:01 AM   #8
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jphess wrote:
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Your photos are 8 MP in size. It isn't the size of the JPEG file that determines the size of the image. The JPEG file is just a container. The JPEG format is quite popular because it compresses the image when it is saved. That doesn't make the image any smaller. It just packs that image into a smaller container. Look at the EXIF data for your image, or any image that you have taken. The pixel dimensions are there. Go ahead and multiply them out and you will see that you have your 8 MP image. It's just that the JPEG file format kind of works the same way as the ZIP file format. Have you ever noticed how heavily text documents can be compressed? That is what the JPEG file does to your image. The JPEG file is not your image, but rather the container that holds the pixels that comprise your image. The size of the JPEG file is not related to the number of megapixels at all.
What an AWESOME explanation!! Thanks so much for clearing that up for me!:-D
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Old Mar 28, 2008, 11:42 AM   #9
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Hey richy,

Nice shot - love those eyes.

the Hun
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Old Mar 29, 2008, 1:24 AM   #10
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rinniethehun wrote:
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Hey richy,

Nice shot - love those eyes.

the Hun
Rinnie..thanks a lot!! I'm sure 10 years from now the attention she draws will drive me nuts!
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