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Old Jan 28, 2010, 7:35 PM   #11
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if you are looking for a camera that performs in auto mode (that includes all the scene junk) then really the F70EXR is not the camera for you. you will not be happy with the results in any auto mode. that is because the auto mode takes away all this camera's strengths. which are improved dynamic range, good high iso performance, and a fairly flexible flash system. to make the most of these, you have to take control of the camera. the camera's auto simply will not do it.

the thing is, setting it up to work great is not that difficult. you can really use 2 settings and be fine. set up your EXR button to DR priority, auto iso 800, DR to 800, Fine, M 4:3, provia. and thats your daytime outdoor shooting mode.

then you use P mode for everything else. no flash P mode is auto-iso 1600, M4:3 Fine, DR-400%, Provia. for flash shots. use ISO 200, force the flash, M4:3, Fine, DR to auto, Provia. if you look and the flash shot is too dark, then bump up the iso to 400 or 800.

but if you just want to shoot auto, or some scene mode. return the camera, its not for you. but don't get the panasonics either, they will choose an even higher ISO for your flash shots and when they do, it will be noisier.

just get a Sony H20, it has a big flash, and will choose a lower iso when using it and just use the auto mode.
I second these comments. Fuji is by far the best compact and bridge cameras you can get only if you understand it. That is why I also said you should go for a canon. They are good in automatics but the noise and colors are horrible and panasonics are worse.. To fully appreciate these, you need to go a little deeper and its not that deep you need to go. My rating and brand name favs are nikons for dslr(just because they are the best)bridge or compact fpr pictures only are fuji first then canon and then panasonic. Fuji first because they are just better for advanced users. Canon and panasonics are for newbs. Not to insult anybody here please but these cameras can go advanced as well but results i n my opinion fall under fuji

Last edited by Cresho; Jan 28, 2010 at 7:41 PM.
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Old Jan 28, 2010, 11:07 PM   #12
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thanks for the replys ... Hards80 - I will try the settings you suggested I really DO want it to work as I said I LOVE the feel of the camera, the 10x zoom in such a small package. I am REALLY impressed with some of the pics others have posted from it, so I know it CAN preform and the problem is with me ... I have a little under a week left to decide if it is for me...

Thanks again guys
If it does not and if the sony is not an option - because I don't like memory stick format... and no wide angle... and don't like the feel of the camera - too big for me...
What camera would you recommend? I want good quality, 10x zoom, fairly easy to use. Or am I better waiting to see how the new cameras like the new sony hx5 I think that is the one or the new panasonics fair?

Also are there any good websites or youtube videos I can watch to learn more about how to pick isos and understand a little more about the camera or photography in general so I can get decent photos. I know there is a lot out there, but what is worth reading or viewing?
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Old Jan 28, 2010, 11:18 PM   #13
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if you do decide to pick up a new camera. i would probably wait. the hx5 may be a good option, not sure yet, i don't know how it will handle flash or if it will be any different than the others. i am sure the new panasonics will behave similar to the old ones, which means they will gain up the ISO to offset the smaller flash, very similar to what you are experiencing now, except they will have more noise. the problem with this compact superzoom cameras is most were designed as travel cameras and were optimized for outdoor travel shots. (minus the sony h20, which seems to buck this trend and is more useful indoors, and lacks the wide-angle for outdoor shots). so its too early to tell, but i would at least wait on the sony hx5 and maybe even see how the new samsung 10x turns out, their later cameras have been better than their earlier ones, so this one may get it right.

as for books, tutorials. Scott Kelby's books are good starters, i think he has some tutorials online as well.

but really i have given you a good starting point. the best way to learn is just start there and experiment. and see the results for yourself.
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Old Jan 29, 2010, 8:57 AM   #14
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if you want to stay with fuji i suggest the f-200, or you can wait for the new f camera that will be released next month-i think the f-200 is a much better camera in terms of ease of use, and i think it has a much better lens and IQ than the f-70, the f-70 is an excellent camera, but you really need to be experienced to use that camera.
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Old Jan 29, 2010, 11:39 AM   #15
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if you want to stay with fuji i suggest the f-200, or you can wait for the new f camera that will be released next month-i think the f-200 is a much better camera in terms of ease of use, and i think it has a much better lens and IQ than the f-70, the f-70 is an excellent camera, but you really need to be experienced to use that camera.
The issue is like this it is not so much I want to stay with Fuji, I want a small camera with 10x zoom... and was attracted to the fuji...
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Old Jan 29, 2010, 12:35 PM   #16
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The issue is like this it is not so much I want to stay with Fuji, I want a small camera with 10x zoom... and was attracted to the fuji...
then i can only speak for fuji as those are the only P+S cameras i own, other than that i use either nikon or fuji dslr's-i've tried other P+S , but fuji are really the only ones that i really like-there is something about a fujifilm camera that nobody else has seemed to replicate-good luck in your endeavors!!
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Old Feb 8, 2010, 8:14 PM   #17
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k guys - I returned the F70 but not sure it was the right choice... I got a samsung wb550 (HZ-15).. and played with the canon sx200 ... although in auto mode they choose ISOs that are lower... their ISO 400 is noisier than the F70 ISO 800... Does anyone know is the F80 any better with the auto modes? Realistically - do you think how Hards80 (Dustin I think) suggested will really work - switching between p and exr-dr mode? I don't mind switching modes but the needing to change the isos all the time.. I just can't do.
Is there another camera that would be better? I think I might have been too fussy at first - now seeing what other p&s give me... maybe the F70 was a good choice...
HELP!!!
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Old Feb 8, 2010, 8:20 PM   #18
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as for your first question, i don't think the auto-modes on the f80 will be much different than the f70, actually i highly doubt the auto-mode algorithms are any different at all. it just adds the HD movies, bigger lcd and ups the pixel count. i am guessing that day to day shooting with the f80 will be exactly hte same as f70, switching btwn exr and p mode with the proper setups.

the new sony hx5 may be something on your radar. sony does a pretty good job with their flashes, they tend to be quite powerful and choose lower iso. (if they use a similar flash system as the h20)
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Old Feb 8, 2010, 9:15 PM   #19
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thanks for the reply... might hang on to see reviews of the sony
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 2:02 PM   #20
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I own the Sony H20 and it is a great little camera. I also own the Fuji F70EXR. If you read a lot of reviews on a certain camera you will find that the noise levels, auto focusing and lens quality tend to be a major issues.

For example the reviews on the F70EXR are generally good, but it does take hits on image quality by some reviewers, while others say it is outstanding. Back in the 50's,60's,70's, and 80's photographers could walk into a camera store, pick out a lens and test it before buying it. The reason being that two identical 50mm F1.8 lens from the same company could be different. One lens could be sharp while the other one was soft.

This problem still remains today. Even with high tech computers, there are to many steps involved to create a very sharp lens every time. The ingredients and purity of the glass, the curvature of the glass, the placement of each lens inside the casing, and the air trapped between each lens will effect the sharpness.

The lens on both the H20 and F70EXR that I own are very sharp. I was lucky. However, I have been bitten in the past. When a Cannon G10 has better image quality then a Nikon D80 DSLR with an expensive 35mm F2.0 lens, it is houston we have problems.

Since I do own both cameras, I would say it is a toss up. The Fuji has a better wide angle coverage (more useful indoors) but the Sony has a better flash and a wee bit sharper lens. The F70EXR auto focus is far better in low light situations then the H20. I have been photographing an old decay building in St. Louis. The weather has been bad, so it has been pretty dark inside that building. The Sony at times could not focus properly without the aid of my million powered torch. The Fuji had no problems. Do not get caught up in the megapixel race. If you want a digicam stay in the 5MP to 10MP range. Anything above that is just nonesense considering the size of the small CCD sensor. If you want big prints without loss of detail, then go the software route. Iam a firm believer that in order to get the most out of your camera, you must have the software to back it up. Both go hand in hand. Genuine fractuals will easily, without breaking a sweat, allow that 5MP image to be blown up to a 16x20 print at 300 DPI without any loss of detail. A lot of Pro's use this product.

In summary, both cameras are excellent, but to get the most out of them practice and experiment. Make sure you leave enough in your budget for some quality software. Remember that it is not so much the difference in these two cameras that makes an big impact, it is the person behind the camera.
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