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Old Apr 13, 2010, 3:41 PM   #81
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Thanks Sarah.. Please let us know the results as soon as you can..

I was just reading about Fuji's firmware updates.
In case I get a defective camera, I should be able to update firmware when (if) they release it for the HS10.. That is, if the problem is with the software and not the hardware....

However, I noticed that there are few updates for the S series cams, so....
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 3:47 PM   #82
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Would be interesting to see if Sarah's camera issues improve after a reset.
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 5:21 PM   #83
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Default HS-10 Camera-wide Reset

OK, Folks-

Here is the report on the reset of this new 1 day old HS-10 camera.

Many thanks to JimC for his timely suggestion to attempt a camera-wide reset to the factory defaults. I completed the reset, and then made the following adjustments:

Reset the file size to Large/Fine
Reset the lens sharpness to Hard
Reset the ISO to 400
Reset the DR to 400
Reset to WB to AWB

With those change completed, I took two photos, using only natural lighting. The first was taken with the HS-10, and you will find the EXIF Data printed in text on the subject. I then took a second "control" photo with my Olympus EPL1 to have a comparison photo.

The result is completely different from the photos taken yesterday (04/12) and last night. I believe that you will easily be able to see the improvement. I believe that it is important to keep in mind that the HS-10 is a super zoom P+S camera. It is not a DSLR camera, or designed to be a DSLR camera. The improvement is rather dramatic so I have decided that I will not have to return the camera.

Naturally, I look forward to you C & C, plus questions. However, this might very well also be a "heads up" notice to folks who will soon be receiving their new Fuji HS-10 cameras. A camera-wide reset may indeed be necessary to get it producing the images that you have a right to expect.

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Old Apr 13, 2010, 5:23 PM   #84
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OK, here is the "control" or comparison photo that I took with the Olympus EPL1.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 5:25 PM   #85
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This is a difference of night and day in IQ. May not be a bad idea to start with a reset on a new camera before taking any pics; what say you?
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 5:29 PM   #86
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now this is more like it. Look how sharp the olympus is! hs10 is looking good as well. Ohh and people don't do what I just did in comparing the sharpness. Obviously, the camera used a different spot in both subjects to adjust focusing...lol Compare both text on camera and background texture.

Last edited by Cresho; Apr 13, 2010 at 5:33 PM.
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 5:31 PM   #87
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These are much better, very good for a point and shoot. Think you will have some long zoom.
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 5:57 PM   #88
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Alright, now we're talking..
Thanks soo much Sarah.. Now I think I WILL buy the HS-10..



Quote:
Originally Posted by Cresho View Post
Obviously, the camera used a different spot in both subjects to adjust focusing...lol Compare both text on camera and background texture.
Yes, the HS-10 seems to have focused on the fabric in the background.
Why's that so?

EDIT: Is it true that there are only 2 settings for aperture control??

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Old Apr 13, 2010, 6:13 PM   #89
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Keep in mind that you've have a big difference in Depth of Field using a model like the EPL1, because it's using a much larger sensor compared to the HS10. As a result, Depth of Field will be much shallower with it compared to a model using a much smaller sensor like the HS10.

The much smaller sensor is one reason the actual focal length of the lens on the HS10 is only 4.2-126mm (it just gives you the same angle of view you'd get using a 24-720mm lens on a 35mm camera, but the actual focal lengths are very short in comparison). That's how they can give you so much zoom range in a relatively small package. ;-)

Since your subject is occupying a *much* greater percentage of the frame for a given actual focal length with a camera using a small sensor like the HS10, you have a lot more depth of field for a given subject framing for a given aperture setting.

The larger the sensor or film size, the shallower your depth of field for a given aperture and subject framing. The smaller the sensor or film size, the greater the depth of field for a given aperture and subject framing. So, even if the focus point was identical and the aperture setting was the same, you'd still see the background getting blurrier faster as you got further away from your focus point using a model like the EPL1 with it's much larger sensor size compared to the HS10.

I don't know the answer to your question about available aperture settings... But, it's not uncommon to see that approach in a point and shoot camera model (only two available aperture settings for any given focal length). Because of the much greater depth of field you have with a point and shoot type camera with a smaller sensor size, more available aperture settings are not needed as much as you'd need with a model using a larger sensor or film size (since unless you're shooting a relatively small subject, you tend to have a lot of depth of field with a camera using a smaller sensor, regardless of aperture setting).
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Old Apr 13, 2010, 6:15 PM   #90
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Sarah, what focusing method are you using? Can you try each of the focusing options to see which is best, including manual?
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