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Old Apr 14, 2010, 9:18 AM   #11
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You know the old expression: "your mileage may vary..."

I don't carry a stopwatch around with me, but I find the save time for both jpeg's and RAW images about the same as the 6000, 8000, 8100, 9100, and the S200EXR, at least for jpeg's. Sometimes the S200 EXR got even slower than the HS-10.

Folks, this is a P+S camera, not a high priced, upper end, DSLR camera. I personally find the times quite tolerable and not as slow as some folks have previously posted in this thread.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 10:30 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
You know the old expression: "your mileage may vary..."

I don't carry a stopwatch around with me, but I find the save time for both jpeg's and RAW images about the same as the 6000, 8000, 8100, 9100, and the S200EXR, at least for jpeg's. Sometimes the S200 EXR got even slower than the HS-10.

Folks, this is a P+S camera, not a high priced, upper end, DSLR camera. I personally find the times quite tolerable and not as slow as some folks have previously posted in this thread.

Sarah Joyce
It's the same sort of thing that happened when the Olympus SP570UZ hit the market. Folks got all bent out of shape because they didn't like the zoom ring or the images were "soft". Granted it took a little getting used to. But, the great majority of the detractors didn't even OWN the camera! It only took a few months to learn that certain settings made the SP570 a GREAT camera. For crying out loud, the HS-10 has been in the hands of VERY few folks; NO ONE has had a chance to really take their time and learn it; yet people are popping out of the woodwork saying ludicrous stuff that is simply conjecture. Let's all just a take a step back, take a deep breath, and chill. If you don't own the camera and have questions/comments, wait a while until we that DO own the camera get some time with it. Don't make any snap judgments that could conceivably prevent you or someone else from getting a good product.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 10:47 AM   #13
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My .02 is that we are all looking for 'the perfect camera'. Obviously there is no one perfect camera, our own needs change! But finding one that has the breadth to cover family-level sports shots, nature pics/panoramas, kids, portraits, etc. would be really awesome - I am personally willing to shell out $500+ for that! Aside from the learning curve, which exists for ALL cameras, for photography in general, it would be so awesome to have a camera that can help us uber-amateurs get some great shots. If the camera works as purported, this is what the HS10 should do for us - and if it doesn't do that, we feel we got ripped. But there IS a learning curve, as gjtoth mentioned. So yeah, lets chill.

And I also agree with Sarah Jane, who's rational mind is a thing of beauty. This is NOT an SLR. It will NOT work as fast as an SLR, and the pic quality will NOT be as incredible. Taken for what it is, SJ and others seem happy that they purchased it...so far!

I am really psyched for this camera to GET HERE ALREADY so I can start playing with it myself! Every tree I pass, kid on a swing, early model car, flower in bloom I am thinking about angles and f-stops.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 12:35 PM   #14
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Another factor to consider is that each of us approach a new camera somewhat differently. Our technical background, our photography skills, and our experience with multiple other cameras all play into the equation. Adapting to a new camera is different for everyone. Give it some time folks.

However, it has already become clear when opening up your new HS-10, that there are three very important steps that you should complete before taking your first photo.

(1) You can use the alkaline batteries included with the camera, that is OK. They may not last long, but when you do change batteries, use eneloops.

(2) Be sure to go to the Set-up Menu and select the appropriate battery type.

(3) Don't be timid about doing a camera reset, if things are not working correctly. Also keep in mind that there are new items on the menu like DR percentages, that you might not have seen before. Read up on them in the Camera Manual. For example, DR does not work at all when using RAW. Otherwise DR follows the ISO setting. In other words, you cannot get DR 200% or DR 400% at ISO 100. The amount of DR increase along with the increasing ISO selected.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 12:48 PM   #15
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I think I'm just going to reset as soon as I get mine. It can't hurt and might just save me on some frustration.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 2:09 PM   #16
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SuoerGrover-

A reset is always an option, and should not hurt the camera at all.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 5:59 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Another factor to consider is that each of us approach a new camera somewhat differently. Our technical background, our photography skills, and our experience with multiple other cameras all play into the equation. Adapting to a new camera is different for everyone. Give it some time folks.

However, it has already become clear when opening up your new HS-10, that there are three very important steps that you should complete before taking your first photo.

(1) You can use the alkaline batteries included with the camera, that is OK. They may not last long, but when you do change batteries, use eneloops.

(2) Be sure to go to the Set-up Menu and select the appropriate battery type.

(3) Don't be timid about doing a camera reset, if things are not working correctly. Also keep in mind that there are new items on the menu like DR percentages, that you might not have seen before. Read up on them in the Camera Manual. For example, DR does not work at all when using RAW. Otherwise DR follows the ISO setting. In other words, you cannot get DR 200% or DR 400% at ISO 100. The amount of DR increase along with the increasing ISO selected.

Sarah Joyce
I just got mine and did these steps (before reading your post); didn't think it was such a big deal.
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 6:05 PM   #18
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I really like it. But I am a little worried about the time it takes the camera to save the shot in the memory card.
What speed and brand of card are you using? Write speeds vary considerably from class to class of cards. On the Fuji compatibility chart, only SD/SDHC cards with a Class 4 or faster write speed are recommended for the HS10. Faster cards have write speeds of class 6 or 10. Slower cards will take longer to record. Also the manual specifies that only Fujifilm or SanDisk cards are approved and guaranteed to work without problems, although other quality name brands like Lexar and Transcend should really do as well. You can also get counterfeit cards on the internet that look legitimate, but do not meet OEM specifications - so only buy from legitimate domestic dealers and get factory packaging, not "bulk" or "oem" cards from China for cheap (I speak from experience here).
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 6:20 PM   #19
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I have not seen this mentioned yet. How long does it take to be ready to shoot after the on/off is turned on (in seconds)?

Thanks
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Old Apr 14, 2010, 6:24 PM   #20
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I have not seen this mentioned yet. How long does it take to be ready to shoot after the on/off is turned on (in seconds)?

Thanks
1.2 seconds
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