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Old May 3, 2010, 6:10 PM   #1
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Default Would you use a lens filter on the HS10?

Do you think it needs it? And if it does, what do you think about the Heliopan filters? Any other suggestions?
Thanks
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Old May 3, 2010, 6:17 PM   #2
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Do you think it needs it? And if it does, what do you think about the Heliopan filters? Any other suggestions?
Thanks
I would use a CPL when shooting at reflective areas such as water or glass and *possibly* a graduated filter if the skies are coming out washed out. Not familiar with Heliopan filters. I use Hoya and Tiffen.
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Old May 4, 2010, 11:45 AM   #3
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HS10 with and without the Circular polarizer from hoya:

The scene is a Cokin A-type graduated ND filter, and the Hoya +4 macrolens on my desk. They reflect my computerscreen; and the CPL takes care of it. It also takes the reflection on the wood away; I was in fact astonished to see the CPL could turn my Imac screen completely black

Notice the drop in shutterspeed between the two:

0.5s f/4.5 ISO100 26.9mm

1.3s f/4.5 ISO100 26.9mm
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Old May 4, 2010, 11:56 AM   #4
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HS10 with and without the Circular polarizer from hoya:

The scene is a Cokin A-type graduated ND filter, and the Hoya +4 macrolens on my desk. They reflect my computerscreen; and the CPL takes care of it. It also takes the reflection on the wood away; I was in fact astonished to see the CPL could turn my Imac screen completely black

Notice the drop in shutterspeed between the two:

0.5s f/4.5 ISO100 26.9mm

1.3s f/4.5 ISO100 26.9mm
Good demo, GB. I was going to try a variable ND until I saw the price of one Then, I came across this http://digital-photography-school.co...density-filter
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Old May 4, 2010, 12:16 PM   #5
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Thanks Gary

Another one: HS10 with and without the graduated ND filter; not the prettiest of pictures, but it shows what the filter does.

The benefit of a filter depends on what you're shooting.

-Graduated filters help to compensate for an overly bright side of a scene.
-CPL filters help getting rich, clear and warm saturated scenes, and work best in (partially) sunlit scenes. They can double as an ND filter, which allows the use of a slower shutter; Helps getting waterfalls blurred for example. (lol, i just wrote this stuff then I read your post with the waterfall example )

I'm not familiar with the heliopan filters either- I use Hoya and Cokin; but still have to get 58mm versions for the HS10

Happy Shooting! GB
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Old May 4, 2010, 1:40 PM   #6
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Good demo, GB. I was going to try a variable ND until I saw the price of one
That's easy - buy two polarizing filters - each $ 5 (Hongkong, with shipping) and you have a variable ND filter.
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Old May 4, 2010, 2:44 PM   #7
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That's easy - buy two polarizing filters - each $ 5 (Hongkong, with shipping) and you have a variable ND filter.
uh... did you read the rest of the post?
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Old May 4, 2010, 3:35 PM   #8
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uh... Did you read the rest of the post?


I tried it. I have two CPLs, and was able to cut the shutter from 1/350 to 1/30. But Couldn't reach the pitch dark thing the guy in the article is talking about; and defenitely no 30 sec exposure. Not on a partially cloudy late noon anyway. but then again, I didn't put a linear on top of a circular; But I doubt if using two circulars makes that much of a difference. Does anyone know if it really requires a linear polarizer on top?
-
Just tried again, setting the cam up again for a 'naked' manual exposure of 1/40, and two CPLs cut the shutter to 1/3; could hit 1/5 with just one. Only shrinking the aperture from F5 to F11 could give me a shutter of 2 to 3 seconds.

So, thus far it sure proves a functional controllable nd filter; but not yet enough to take a multi second exposure in broad daylight on a square. (another way to eliminate moving object in the frame )

Happy shooting! GB
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Old May 4, 2010, 3:40 PM   #9
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I tried it. I have two CPLs, and was able to cut the shutter from 1/350 to 1/30. But Couldn't reach the pitch dark thing the guy in the article is talking about; and defenitely no 30 sec exposure. Not on a partially cloudy late noon anyway. but then again, I didn't put a linear on top of a circular; But I doubt if using two circulars makes that much of a difference. Does anyone know if it really requires a linear polarizer on top?
-
Just tried again, setting the cam up again for a 'naked' manual exposure of 1/40, and two CPLs cut the shutter to 1/3; could hit 1/5 with just one. Only shrinking the aperture from F5 to F11 could give me a shutter of 2 to 3 seconds.

So, thus far it sure proves a functional controllable nd filter; but not yet enough to take a multi second exposure in broad daylight on a square. (another way to eliminate moving object in the frame )

Happy shooting! GB
That's about the results I got. I do, however, have a linear PL coming. Can't hurt for $6 and SURE beats $250-300!!
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Old May 4, 2010, 4:28 PM   #10
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wow, 250 - 300$ is a lot for a fader.. Over here (the Netherlands) the internet shops sell a Light Craft Fader ND Filter nd2 - nd400 size 58mm for 60.-
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