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Old Jun 27, 2010, 9:00 AM   #1
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Default DSLR vs Bridge Aperture values

A quick search did not help me...

How do Bridge camera's (eg Finepix S5600 and HS10) narrower aperture values compare with the wider values of a typical DSLR?

EG What is the s5600 equivalent aperture value compared to a DSLR value of say F5.6 and F11.0?

Is there a table of equivalents values anywhere?


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Chris
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Old Jun 27, 2010, 9:31 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by adamsc57 View Post
A quick search did not help me...

How do Bridge camera's (eg Finepix S5600 and HS10) narrower aperture values compare with the wider values of a typical DSLR?

EG What is the s5600 equivalent aperture value compared to a DSLR value of say F5.6 and F11.0?

Is there a table of equivalents values anywhere?


Regards
Chris
In what way do you mean?

Aperture is aperture, it doesn't matter what lens/camera you are talking about is it simply is the relationship with the size of the aperture and the focal length. So 50mm on a dSLR with f4 is the same as 50mm f4 on a bridge. They will both allow the same amount of light in so with the same ISO you have the same shutter speeds.

What is different is how it affects the depth of field (DOF), if you want to play around with some settings then take a look at http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html which will allow you to see how changing focal lengths and apertures affects the in/out of focus areas.
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Old Jun 27, 2010, 9:55 AM   #3
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Hey Chris:

If you mean for Depth of Field purposes for a given subject framing, keep in mind that a camera like the Fuji S5600 has a very tiny sensor in comparison to a dSLR.

That's why the actual focal length of it's lens is only 6.3-63mm (which gives you the same angle of view you'd have using a 38-380mm lens on a 35mm camera). As a result, you'll have much greater depth of field for a given subject framing and aperture. Basically, if you multiply the actual focal length by 6x, you'd be able to tell what focal length lens you'd need on a 35mm camera to give you the same angle of view.

You'd need to be more specific about the dSLR type you want to compare it against (as different dSLR models will have different sensor sizes).

But, dSLR models using a Sony APS-C size sensor (most Nikon models, most Sony models, some Pentax models), you'd need to multiply the focal length of a lens by 1.5x to see what lens would give you the same angle of view on a 35mm camera.

For example, if you wanted a "35mm equivalent" focal length (from an angle of view perspective) of 75mm using a model using a Sony APS-C size sensor, you'd be using an actual focal length of approximately 50mm.

For the same angle of view with a Fuji S5200/S5600, you'd be using an actual focal length of 12.5mm.

So, you could use this Depth of Field Calculator that Mark suggested looking at, and select a model like the Nikon D3000, D5000, D90, or D300; and plug in a focal length of 50mm, focus distance of 5 feet, and an Aperture of f/5.6 to see what you would get for Depth of Field using those settings; and it would work out to approximately 0.76 feet total depth of field (0.31 feet in front of your focus point, 0.36 feet behind your focus point).

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

To see how the Fuji S5200 (F5600) compares after selecting it from the list of cameras, you would need to plug in an actual focal length of 12.5mm (same angle of view you'd get with a 50mm lens on a camera with an APS-C size sensor, or with a 75mm lens on a camera with a 35mm film size sensor), using the same focus distance of 5 feet.

What you'll find is that the calculator is going to tell you that you'd need to be shooting at f/1.4 to get approximately the same Depth of Field. But, you don't have apertures that wide on a model like the Fuji S5200. ;-)

Basically, you'll see a roughly 4 stop difference in apertures needed to get the same depth of field when comparing it to a model using an APS-C size sensor. So, if you're shooting at around f/4 with the Fuji S5600, you'd have roughly the same depth of field you'd have using around f/16 with a dSLR (assuming a Sony APS-C size sensor). The aperture scale in one stop increments runs f/1, f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22, f/32, f/45, f/64...

For example, if you plug in f/4, 12.5mm focal length and a focus distance of 5 feet with the Fuji, you'll have a total Depth of Field of around 2 feet. Yet, if you select a camera using a Sony APS-C size sensor, using 50mm (to get the same angle of view/subject framing at a focus distance of 5 feet); you'd need to stop down to around f/16 to get that much depth of field.

IOW, you're going to have a *lot* more Depth of Field with a camera using a small sensor like a Fuji S5200/S5600 for a given subject framing and aperture.

The smaller the sensor or film size, the greater the depth of field for a given subject framing and aperture. The larger the sensor or film size, the shallower the depth of field for a given subject framing and aperture.
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Old Jun 28, 2010, 11:41 PM   #4
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Thanks guys.

Yes I was asking in terms of DoF and the web site you both pointed out explained it for me. The Online Depth of Field table which shows actual distances for each F stop was really helpful.

Jim thanks for your very detailed answer. A few readings later and it was making sense to me.

I appreciate both of your responses.

How do you come up with the 6x and 1.5x factors?

Regards

Chris
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Old Jun 29, 2010, 2:09 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by adamsc57 View Post
Thanks guys.

....................................

How do you come up with the 6x and 1.5x factors?
The factors are the relationship between the smaller size sensors over 35mm, so with a lens it appears that the field of view is 6 or 1.5x greater than that of the actual lens focal length.

This thread should help http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ge...op-factor.html
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Old Jun 29, 2010, 6:28 AM   #6
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So this is also the reason that my HS10 at 24mm has the same magnification than my D90 with the 18-200 mm at 18 mm ?
Or am i missing something
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Old Jun 29, 2010, 7:02 AM   #7
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So this is also the reason that my HS10 at 24mm has the same magnification than my D90 with the 18-200 mm at 18 mm ?
Or am i missing something
No, this is where the confusion really arises with the focal lengths. What is on your HS10 is not the actual focal length but rather the 35mm equivalent, they do this as it is a standard that people can use to compare field of views so you know roughly what a photo will look like through the lens. It says it has a focal length of 24-720mm but actually the lens is 4.2-126mm. It is the small sensor that makes the lens seem a lot longer.

So the 4.2mm lens on the HS10 gives a 24mm equivalent field of view compared to a 35mm film/sensor, on your D90 with the sensor slightly smaller than 35mm thus having a 1.5x crop factor to have a 24mm equivalent field of view it is going to need a 16mm lens, so the 18mm is similar but very slightly longer.
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Old Jun 29, 2010, 7:43 AM   #8
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To expand on Mark's comments, if you look at the front of the lens, you'll see it's actual focal length. The H10 has a 4.2-126mm f/2.8-5.6 lens on it.

You'll also see that in your camera's specifications (see the focal length section):

f=4.2 - 126.0mm, equivalent to 24 - 720mm on a 35mm camera

http://www.fujifilm.com/products/dig...ons/index.html

Note that is says "equivalent to 24 - 720mm on a 35mm camera", while still showing you the real focal length of the lens in it's specifications. ;-)

Basically, you'd multiply the actual focal length by 5.714 to see what focal length lens you'd need on a 35mm camera for the same angle of view.

That type of camera is using a very tiny sensor. That's how they can give you that much zoom range (given the 35mm equivalent angle of view you'd have) in such a small and light package.

For one thing, they can use much shorter focal length lenses on it. Another thing is that the image circle projected by the lens can be much smaller and still cover the tiny sensor (allowing them to make the lenses even smaller and lighter).
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Old Jun 29, 2010, 8:26 AM   #9
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Thanks for the explanation guy's
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