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Old Sep 14, 2010, 12:59 PM   #1
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Default F80 EXR Snow Settings

Hi,

I just bought an F80 EXR camera and soon will be going to Livigno in the Snow, and that is the reason I bought a new camera Im still a beginner so I don't know much about cameras but Im willing to learn

What do you think might be some good settings to take pictures of snow vistas please?

And what settings could I use for normal photos still in the snow?

Thanks a lot for the help guys
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Old Sep 14, 2010, 1:05 PM   #2
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the settings guide i put together for f70exr hold true for the f80exr as well.
see:
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fu...-exr-cams.html

Setting #1 will be a good choice for your snow shots, as the increased dynamic range will help you to keep from blowing out the highlights.
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Old Sep 14, 2010, 1:25 PM   #3
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thanks for the quick reply

yes I saw that guide and its already favorited for when the camera arrives I will try to play with it a bit before going on the holiday..

just a small question.. so the dynamic range should be increased when getting a bigger shoot, and decreased when getting closer shots?
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Old Sep 14, 2010, 1:53 PM   #4
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The dynamic range is the range of light that the sensor can capture. So a scene with high dynamic range such as a bright sunny day with shadows has a big difference in light between the bright areas and the shadows. This is difficult for cameras to handle.

On the camera the DR %, either 100% (no increase) up to 800% refers to how much of a boost in dynamic range the setting gives.

So the 800% in the EXR mode, (like setting #1), gives the largest dynamic range boost, so you can capture a wider range of light. so in the example of shots in the snow, it will give the best chance of not blowing out the highlights.
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Old Sep 15, 2010, 4:28 AM   #5
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If I could make a general point about shooting snow scenes, you'll find that the camera may well tend to under-expose, resulting in grey snow and murky detail.

The reason for this is that, unless the camera is told otherwise, it will assume that it should be exposing for mid-scale tones across as much as possible in the frame. This is why there will no doubt be a "snow-scene" mode available (there is in my F70EXR).

I don't know how successfull the snow-scene setting will be, as I've never tried it, but there are other ways of getting the correct exposure:

In Program mode, try a bit of (positive) exposure compensation (such as +2EV).

Or (again in Program mode) try using centre-spot metering. This would allow you to get the exposure right for the main subject (such as a person), and the snow will usually end up a nice snowy white. Be aware that the centre "spot" may be fairly broad, and that you may well need to get used to locking the exposure (by holding the shutter button halfway) then recomposing.

If I were you I would experiment with all the various methods, to see which works best for you.

Regarding the use of expanded dynamic range, if I may (very!) respectfully disagree, Hards80, I would worry that the situation may be made worse. In other words, the camera would be trying very hard to accommodate detail in the snow, and the snow would therefore end up greyish.

The best solution might be to go for DR200, i.e. a compromise. Again, experimentation is indicated!

Anyway, I hope I haven't confused things too much, masini! And good luck with your shooting!
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Old Sep 15, 2010, 9:51 AM   #6
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thanks for your help guys. since im still new ill try to take a note with me to remind me the settings you suggested for me I never had a digital camera which has these settings (the only one I had was a cheap canon which I got for free..) so I dont know what settings I should change etc..

What I learnt from going through some forums was to use low shutter speed (ISO 100 - 200) in bright light conditions and faster shutter speeds (ISO 400 - 800). Also, for this specific camera I should use the 5mp setting instead of the full 12mp one.

About dynamic range, do you mean that you need to set a higher DR value to get more colors and details in the shot? When i get my camera I will be able to test better since right now I dont have a camera which has those settings to test the difference with..

Last question, If I only change the ISO, DR and Exposure, should I be fine? Or should there be other settings to change?

Last edited by masini; Sep 15, 2010 at 9:52 AM. Reason: Added a question
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Old Sep 15, 2010, 9:55 AM   #7
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Pentode made a good point about adding some +EV that I failed to mention. if you are finding your snow to be too grey, add 1 or 2 EV and see if it looks more natural.

however using the extended DR will not as he says make the snow more grey once you add the EV. the grey will come from a wrong exposure, not from having more dynamic range. so i would still use the DR increase, but do experiment with adding +EV until your snow looks white.
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Last edited by Hards80; Sep 15, 2010 at 9:57 AM.
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Old Sep 15, 2010, 10:12 AM   #8
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Are exposure and exposure compensation the same thing? I know its a stupid question but to be sure its better to ask

And do you think the snow could mess up my camera? as that is the most thing Im worried about...
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Old Sep 15, 2010, 10:22 AM   #9
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exposure is basically the amount of light that gets to the sensor, which will determine how dark or light your photo is. your camera's metering will try to determine the best exposure given the scene.

exposure compensation refers to manually modifying the cameras' own metering. so a +EV will make the scene lighter than the camera's meter chose, while -EV will make it darker.


as long as you don't drop your camera into the snow. i would not worry about it.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 2:47 AM   #10
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So if I only change and experiment with the ISO, DR and Exposure settings, should I be fine? Or should there be other settings to experiment with to get good picture quality?

Last edited by masini; Sep 16, 2010 at 2:49 AM.
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