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Old Apr 29, 2011, 11:09 PM   #1
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Default HS 20 panorama

First attempt....

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Old Apr 29, 2011, 11:10 PM   #2
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Are you sure you haven't done this for a living?
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Old Apr 29, 2011, 11:22 PM   #3
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very cool.
please explain the technique. how many shots it that?
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Old Apr 29, 2011, 11:29 PM   #4
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I just switched the camera to panorama mode started at the left, pressed the shutter once and keeping the camera as level as I could, slowly pivoted it to the right...The camera did the rest...It was pretty easy...
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Old Apr 30, 2011, 7:34 AM   #5
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I love this feature on my F300 EXR. The results, although at a limited Pixel height and depth are so sharp its unreal. Also, it gives you a kind of spirit level/horizon line tool which enables the user to keep the scene level. Im sure the HS20 will too. The camera also seems to 'repair' any transgressions/movement really successfully.

Some other cameras work by the user manually taking 5 photographs in succession, the end of each image leaving a ghost image to allow the user to align it with the next one, which is then aligned with the next shot and so on.... the problem being that they are obviously 'stitched' with the horizon line and perspective obviously showing the distortion of the lens......... resulting in wavy, zig zag images lol.....

This has to be best part of the Fujis EXR processing suite. They look natural. They capture a spirit of a place so well. I don't think Fuji can be congratulated enough for this.

For anyone who's not familiar you can take them from the left, right, up or down by selecting from a list, and take 120 degree, 180 degree or even 360 degree shots. Imagine being stood on your favourite hill or place and using this feature.....brilliant!

I think that there is no need for a tripod, but perhaps its would make it even better.

A word of warning though, the exposure is set ONCE throughout the entire image, so either try to get an average reading for contrasting light conditions or set the exposure on the places where you want the viewers eye to go...
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Old Apr 30, 2011, 7:37 AM   #6
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btw its so quick and effortless to get good results. I wonder what taking even more time with a tripod would enable you to do. I really want to go out with the HS-20 and take an image of my favourite hill walk which is in Yorkshire England. Hey Guus, I bet yorkshire is hillier than the Dutch landscape, Im currently writing university essay about the painter Mondriaan and how he was influenced by Dutch Landscape. Trouble is Id rather be in the landscaps than writing about them. MEH.
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Old Apr 30, 2011, 8:29 AM   #7
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While this feature worked on the HS-10, Fuji have really tweaked it to perfection in the HS-20. Well done!
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Old Apr 30, 2011, 9:15 AM   #8
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My understanding of Panoramas, at least in the DSLR I currently have, is that all shots must be taken at the same values, (speed, f stop, focus, and ISO) so that the stitching can be uniform - in other words, taken at a single, constant manual setting.

The downside of that process is if you have highly varying brightness from one end of the panorama to the other, the contrast will be beyond the capability of the camera.

For example, in the background in the left several inches of the panorama, above the bridge, the highlights are blown out. If the image was deliverable in RAW (a physical impossibility with all the processing required to produce the panorama) some of the highlights might be recoverable. I wonder how much jpg post proscessing can be done with that image?

Editing the image in Elements, going to Enhance:Adjust lighting:Shadows Highlight darken highlights, moving that Darken Highlights slider to the right recovers some of the background trees at the top. And that is from just the 1 meg file posted on Steve's. Your file size is probably much larger and you could do much more with it. In fact, what is the file size of your original?

On the artisitc side, the image looks perfect. Great job.

Last edited by gfmucci; Apr 30, 2011 at 9:55 AM.
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Old Apr 30, 2011, 11:11 AM   #9
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my mind went right away to a tripod. A motorized tripod that can revolve horizontally either direction and that tilts 90degrees and then can still rotate to take overhead. or you release the motor drive and can pivot in any direction to give very cool angles results.

so when you say it takes images contiuously..like a video or a ton of still shots ? and say you move around too fast , what is the result. or another way of saying this..what is the ideal speed of rotation and about how many shots is the camera taking?
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Old Apr 30, 2011, 11:27 AM   #10
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I wish i could tell you how fast you have to move, but its just something you have to have experience with really. The camera will interupt the process if the user is going too fast or too slow.


From my experience, my F300EXR seems to take 3/4 still image shots a second.

A tripod which stopped vertical movement and which just panned horizontally would be your best bet for horizontal panoramas. You could use the tripod mount arm to spin it around.

When I think about this feature, I think about how *goooooooood* it is. If only Pro Focus were as well implemented at this stage.
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