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Old Jan 2, 2012, 6:30 PM   #1
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Default HS20 8M or 16M ???

I was wondering if anybody could explain why some people tell me to set the camera to medium (8M). I did this for a while and then went into a camera shop that knows there stuff and asked him about it. He told me it's always best to use the highest setting on any camera. Could anyone explain what the advantage is to set it on 8M.
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Old Jan 2, 2012, 8:56 PM   #2
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I won't say the best setting is 8MP. But when you shoot the highest available MP your files will be huge and take up a lot of space for storage. I work part time for a local newspaper and when I first got the camera I had it set to 16MP and it was overloading their system when I needed to turn in a full batch of photos. So we got together and I ended up setting the camera to 12MP. The images set to 12MP produce excellent full covers and are large enough in detail to be cropped when needed.

Basically if you have unlimited storage space and you plan to print huge prints then shoot at full resolution. If your just going to burn every image you take to disc and view them on your computer than in my opinion 12MP is plenty. But I feel 8MP is a little too small if you need to crop into an image etc. I'd be looking at 12MP for normal stuff and once in a lifetime events like a wedding shoot at full resolution. I have had a 16x20 print made from a 12MP capture and it turned out great.

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Old Jan 3, 2012, 8:00 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HavToNo View Post
I was wondering if anybody could explain why some people tell me to set the camera to medium (8M). I did this for a while and then went into a camera shop that knows there stuff and asked him about it. He told me it's always best to use the highest setting on any camera. Could anyone explain what the advantage is to set it on 8M.
Fuji cameras are known for their 'EXR' sensors. These sensors can use a smaller portion of their photo-sites (cells which capture light) to take supposedley sharper photos or photos with 'truer to life' range of blacks to whites. This is because there is more light for each cell. Higher mega pixel count does not mean higher sharpness. This is a popular myth. The sensor is so small that cramming the average compact sensor with anything above 10mp is a waste of time as it can result in more noise, artefacts and less sharpness etc.

Some suggest that by taking a picture at 6mp, you are forcing the 12mp sensor into EXR mode, and thus taking a potentially, cleaner, sharper image.

I dont believe this myself, as I think selecting 6mp on any mode other than EXR actually probably downsamples a 12mp image to 6mp equivalent. Downsampling an image can often make it appear to have higher clarity.

However, I could be wrong on the last statement.

See what works best for you. Do tests. People in camera shops often know very little about their stuff they are selling, least of all Fuji EXR sensors. One guy the other day couldn't even turn a Samsung on when I asked him to show it to me. In a lot of camera shops, especially the big ones in the UK, only Nikon will pay for training of the staff, which obviously means that some staff have a bias of knowledge and bias towards one manufacturer.
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Old Jan 3, 2012, 3:10 PM   #4
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G'day HTN

The other blokes ^ have offered some good advice ... may I continue it
@Dave is on the button with reduced file sizes after reducing the pixels & maybe this small sketch will make sense to you



ie- by choosing to drop from 12mpx to 9mpx or to 6mpx [or whatever options your camera menu gives you], all you are doing is using less than 100% of the sensor, and by doing so, the file size saved to memory card/ disk is reduced as well

Insofar as the Fuji EXR system of "manipulating pixels" goes, maybe this fuji video will explain it. It is a very smart way of doing things, although some people reckon that it doesn't work. In my testing of a Fuji S200 EXR camera, I got some "very nice results" when using it in EXR mode

http://www.fujifilmexr.com/

Hope this all helps too
Regards, Phil
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Old Jan 3, 2012, 6:45 PM   #5
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I just did a test using my F300EXR.

Shooting in EXR NR mode, where allegedley some of the pixels are binned in a square half, the quaility is slightly improved over the full normal megapixel count in terms of dynamic range (gradual contrast instead of clipped high and lowlights).

If I tried moving from L to M, the quality dropped in all modes. Shooting in medium size (from 12mp to 6mp) did not result in better quality for me, whether or not the EXR sensor (MODE) is engaged or not. etc etc.

At least, on an F300 EXR, unless you are wanting to photograph for web such as Facebook or web pages, I would choose L setting (Full Megapixel) everytime.

I bought my F300EXR thinkign it would be the bees knees. It was a bit of a let down. In terms of sharpness and clarity I recommend always selecting highest file sizes and highest pixel output. If you do want to try out the pixel binning 8mp mode on the HS20EXR, use the dedicated EXR mode. I dont believe that selecting 8MP in manual mode activates EXR mode at all personally on an EXR camera, at least not in my F300EXR experience.

I would keep shooting at maximum file size and just compress it later on Photoshop, much better algorythms at keeping quality.

Last edited by Lifeforms; Jan 3, 2012 at 6:51 PM.
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Old Jan 3, 2012, 7:18 PM   #6
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Thanks for all the info guys. I just did a bunch of tests in all the EXR modes, program mode and manual. I took one picture in L and another one in M in every setting with the camera on a tripod. All the camera settings were the same, ISO ect and the subject stayed the same (Christmas angels under a lamp). In EXR and Program mode there was slighty less noise on M but when you zoom in on the picture it starts to break up much sooner than the one set on L. For the picture I took in manual I used my EF-42 external flash to make sure there was lots of light(flash was set on manual to make sure the light was the same on both). Both pictures looked the same until I zoomed in and the M setting broke up a lot sooner than the L setting. So I guess it will stay set on L(16meg) It's amazing how we never stop learning.
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Old Jan 4, 2012, 3:28 AM   #7
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I agree with Lifeforms ! I have marked absolutely the same on my HS-20.
So I also shoot on L, but I use the Jpeg compression on normal instead of fine

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Old Jan 4, 2012, 4:47 AM   #8
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Small correction to Phil's diagram which makes it look like you're sacrificing more than you really are. The relative sizes are more like this:




I'm also not sure that you do really use less of the sensor which would be the equivalent of the EZZoom on my Panasonic FZ38. It makes more sense if the camera uses the full sensor and downsizes it to the smaller resolution. Easy to test - try taking a shot at full zoom in 12MP and 6MP and see if you get the same image at different resolutions or if the 6MP one is a crop of the 12MP one.
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Old Jan 4, 2012, 8:41 AM   #9
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Default MP Size

I would like to know how you compute the mp size that your camera is set on. I have a HS20 and have no clue as to how the file size chart in the owners man. relates to the mp size its set on. I'm set on M 4:3 1947, how dose that relate to the mp size ie; 12, 8 or whatever? This is likely a dumb question I know but I'm just not seeing it.
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Old Jan 4, 2012, 9:05 AM   #10
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If you go back into thr menu where you see the line M 4:3 to the right of it (if you have that line highlites/scrolled to/selected) it will tell you the MP size. Starting at the top of that menu page is the highest MP (16) and goes down to the smallest at the bottom.

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