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Old Jun 19, 2013, 10:19 AM   #1
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Now this might be a dumb question..

What exactly does ISO mean, and how can I use it.. I'm mostly a landscape photographer. But I told that if I change my ISO settings, I can make water look more fluid.

I have 2 filters for my 20, I have a polarized & a UV, that is really all the extras I have.. I would like to look at getting a shutter release for taking night shots..

Also in Manual mode (yes I have read the limited manual) how do i set my shutter to stay open longer..
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Old Jun 19, 2013, 12:22 PM   #2
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Here's a link with some good high level info in the first 2 paragraphs:
http://digital-photography-school.com/iso-settings

Changing ISO does not really affect how water looks - changing Shutter Speed does. The faster the shutter speed the more "frozen" water becomes. The slower the shutter speed the more "fluid" it will appear.

But, ISO, shutter speed and aperture all work together. If you change one of the variables without changing one or both of the other two, your resulting image will appear darker or lighter.

Here's a basic overview of that concept:
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...a-exposure.htm

This should help give you some background. Take a read and if you still have questions, let us know.
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Old Jun 19, 2013, 12:24 PM   #3
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As for a shutter release cable for the Fuji. Look at this:
http://www.amazon.com/DURAGADGET-Shu.../dp/B007PFBXOU

I'm not familiar with your Fuji camera, so someone else will have to explain what controls to use to adjust aperture and shutter speed (and ISO) when shooting in manual mode
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Old Jun 19, 2013, 2:34 PM   #4
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Set your camera to Aperture Preferred, ISO (sensitivity) to 100, use your polarizer as a neural density filter. I would probably try to set an Aperture, of around F6 or so depending on the amount of light. What you are attempting to do, is get a shutter speed of 1/15th of a second or longer, to get the effect you are looking for.

As far as buying an expensive button, or shutter release as you call it. I would just use my 2 second delay timer to trigger the camera, its much cheaper.
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Old Jun 20, 2013, 5:38 AM   #5
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Thank you
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Old Jun 20, 2013, 6:48 PM   #6
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G'day Pantharen

Several things mate ... [apart from Welcome to Steve's as a new member]
Your camera came with a CD of stuff - one item on the CD is a 100+ page book on its use
May I suggest you take the CD to a local print shop and ask them to create a 'proper' book. I did with my Fuji, cost me $20 and I now have a great A5-sized book that travels easily with me

Now to your queries -
John & Simon have given you good info above - I'll try a bit more

ISO used to be called Film-Speed ie- the sensivity to light > the higher the sensitivity, the higher the shutter speed used to take a particular photo.
In bright light you do not need a high ISO - however in low light you can use a higher-then-daylight ISO to keep taking photos before you need flash or a tripod

Like you - I also like to do running water shots
I try to do mine very late in the day when the light is fading - this gives me long shutter speeds quite easily

If I may - here's a typical photo

Photo taken just before sunset, ISO=100; Aperture mode set to camera's smallest aperture [f11 in my Fuji camera] therefore forcing the longest shutter speed for that light amount it gave me 1,3 seconds

Hope this helps a bit
Regards, Phil
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Old Jun 22, 2013, 3:46 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozzie_Traveller View Post
G'day Pantharen

Several things mate ... [apart from Welcome to Steve's as a new member]
Your camera came with a CD of stuff - one item on the CD is a 100+ page book on its use
May I suggest you take the CD to a local print shop and ask them to create a 'proper' book. I did with my Fuji, cost me $20 and I now have a great A5-sized book that travels easily with me

Now to your queries -
John & Simon have given you good info above - I'll try a bit more

ISO used to be called Film-Speed ie- the sensivity to light > the higher the sensitivity, the higher the shutter speed used to take a particular photo.
In bright light you do not need a high ISO - however in low light you can use a higher-then-daylight ISO to keep taking photos before you need flash or a tripod

Like you - I also like to do running water shots
I try to do mine very late in the day when the light is fading - this gives me long shutter speeds quite easily

If I may - here's a typical photo

Photo taken just before sunset, ISO=100; Aperture mode set to camera's smallest aperture [f11 in my Fuji camera] therefore forcing the longest shutter speed for that light amount it gave me 1,3 seconds

Hope this helps a bit
Regards, Phil
WOW that picture is amazing..

Most of the places I find waterfalls, being as deep into the woods as I go late in the day isn't always the safest thing to do.. I still haven't mounted my 100w off-road driving lights, so I'm leery about being in the back country at night..

If you're on Facebook here is some of my photos. https://www.facebook.com/PantharenPhotography
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Nikon D60 DSLR (rarely used anymore)
Olympus 8000 (never used anymore, as I lost my data cable).
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