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Old Apr 2, 2004, 3:02 PM   #1
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Default S7000 Resolution Questions

I have just purchased a Fuji S7000 and have not received it yet. I am upgrading from a very old digital camera that was 2 mp. According to some reviews I read, the S7000 has the following storage capabilities with a 256 MB xD card:

Resolution RAW (4048x3040) 19 images - approximately 13MB
Resolution 12M (4048x3040) 52 images - approximately 4.9MB
Resolution 12M (4048x3040) 105 images - approximately 2.5MB
Resolution 6M (2848x2136) 169 images - approximately 1.5MB
Resolution 3M (2016x1512) 332 images - approximately 760MB
Resolution 2M (4048x3040) 409 images - approximately 630MB
Resolution 1M (4048x3040) 550 images - approximately 470MB

I have also read several reviews where users thought the 6MB gave the best resolution. Do you agree? Why wouldn't the 12M (4048x3040) 105 images give a better resolution?
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Old Apr 2, 2004, 9:17 PM   #2
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Default Re: S7000 Resolution Questions

Quote:
I have also read several reviews where users thought the 6MB gave the best resolution. Do you agree? Why wouldn't the 12M (4048x3040) 105 images give a better resolution?
The reviewer would be ignorant of how the SCCD functioned if they indeed made that statement.

The interpolation is required to reorient the CCD read to standard orientation. You must understand that the FUJI S7000 uses a CCD with photosites laid at 45 degree angles:

KEY:
X=raw ccd read, spatial location on sensor
0=interplated pixel

Here is a SCCD sensor:

X_X_X
_X_X_
X_X_X

Now, name one monitor, editing applilcatin or printer that can deal with interleaved pixels...... NONE.

In order to rearange to a usable format, averaged pixels must be inserted in final image processing:

X0X0X
0X0X0
X0X0X

Now, we have usable file format.

The 6MP output is a downsampled version of the 12MP file that was originallly created. As a rule, data must be averaged to downsample an image, obliterating some real data in the process.

LEt me speculate: Most reviewers are looking at the 12MP file on screen at 100 percent. This is like zooming into a film scan at several hundred percent and complaining that is looks fuzzy and full of grain. You have to look at it from teh proper perspective. In this case: on a print! Of coruse 6MP looks sharper, this is like viewing something from a farther distance. Don't misunderstand, viewing on screen at magnification is useful if you know what and how to compare.

-Chris
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Old Apr 3, 2004, 12:10 AM   #3
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OOPS my friend,


"Raw (Photoshop)
--------------------------------------------------
Raw format is a flexible file format for transferring images between applications and computer platforms. This format supports CMYK, RGB, and grayscale images with alpha channels, and multichannel and Lab images without alpha channels.

Raw format consists of a stream of bytes describing the color information in the image. Each pixel is described in binary format, with 0 representing black and 255 white (for images with 16-bit channels, the white value is 65535). Adobe Photoshop designates the number of channels needed to describe the image, plus any additional channels in the image. You can specify the file extension (Windows), file type (Mac OS), file creator (Mac OS), and header information.

In Mac OS, the file type is generally a four-character ID that identifies the file--for example, TEXT identifies the file as an ASCII text file. The file creator is also generally a four-character ID. Most Mac OS applications have a unique file creator ID that is registered with the Apple Computer Developer Services group.

The header parameter specifies how many bytes of information appear in the file before actual image information begins. This value determines the number of zeroes inserted at the beginning of the file as placeholders. By default, there is no header (header size = 0). You can enter a header when you open the file in Raw format. You can also save the file without a header and then use a file-editing program, such as HEdit (Windows) or Norton Utilities® (Mac OS), to replace the zeroes with header information.

****You can save the image in an interleaved or noninterleaved format. If you choose interleaved, the color values (red, green, and blue, for example) are stored sequentially. Your choice depends on requirements of the application that will open the file. ****"
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Old Apr 3, 2004, 12:20 AM   #4
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btw Jim,

Shoot with 12MP Normal, the results are better over all than 6MP.
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Old Apr 3, 2004, 2:04 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KGB
OOPS my friend,


"Raw (Photoshop)
--------------------------------------------------
****You can save the image in an interleaved or noninterleaved format. If you choose interleaved, the color values (red, green, and blue, for example) are stored sequentially. Your choice depends on requirements of the application that will open the file. ****"
However, my meaning was different. As with many things, 'interleave' can have many different applications, depending on the specific context. In my example, this was meant to apply stricly to the physical configuration of source sensor. IN your example, interleaving is applied to the order of stored bytes, not to the physical format of the sampling device(SCCD). The extent of direct manipulation with the non-traditional 'interleaved' graphic format from teh SCCD sensors ends with the RAW conversion. You then have a standard format, represented and manipulated in editing in a physically non-interleaved format. Their is no editor that allows modifiocation or display in native 45 degree format that I am aware of, since all image display and printing devices print in a square(0 degree) format.

-Chris
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Old Apr 3, 2004, 1:56 PM   #6
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LOL.......LOL
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Old Apr 12, 2004, 12:21 AM   #7
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Hi Jim,

Suggest you use CF card instead - they are much easier to find and you can get higher capacity for less money.

The RAW converter furnished with the S7000Z is practically worthless, but if you buy the latest version (PhotoShop 8 - also called PhotoShop CS) you can use the included Adobe RAW converter which has much, much more power. The provided RAW converter simply converts the RAW capture to a tiff file and you have absolutely zero ability to change any parameters "before" conversion. The Adobe RAW converter lets you set exposure, sharpness, a wide variety of color hue, saturation, noise control, etc. It's the best way to get the highest quality from the S7000Z.

As for the differences between six and 12 megapixel modes - 12 looks pretty poor on screen, but prints are stunning. Any huge file tends to look soft and definitely looks better when greatly reduced in size for screen viewing, but the 12 megapixel capture mode produces the best resolution and will allow very large, detailed prints.

Lin
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Old Apr 12, 2004, 12:27 PM   #8
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Default Re: S7000 Resolution Questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Shearer
...
I have also read several reviews where users thought the 6MB gave the best resolution. Do you agree? Why wouldn't the 12M (4048x3040) 105 images give a better resolution?
Yes, the 12M (interpolated) will be better RESOLUTION---but:

I have the 602Z which is a 3M camera with 6M (interpolated) setting.

My 3M (Fine setting) produces a CLEARER pic than the 6M (Fine). I think people are confusing resolution (number of pixels) with quality.

Many things affect quality, one of the many being resolution.
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 11:48 AM   #9
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Default Re: S7000 Resolution Questions

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My 3M (Fine setting) produces a CLEARER pic than the 6M (Fine). I think people are confusing resolution (number of pixels) with quality.

Many things affect quality, one of the many being resolution
I'm not sure if you are saying that 3M is superior to 6M or if just appears that way. BUt in fact, 6M mode is superior in absolute terms of resolution. This is a measurable and repeatable phenomena. 3M mode is a downsampled version of the 6M image. This must result in data loss. So test results are not suprising.

-Chris
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Old Apr 16, 2004, 3:02 PM   #10
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Default Re: S7000 Resolution Questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by WmAx
I'm not sure if you are saying that 3M is superior to 6M or if just appears that way. BUt in fact, 6M mode is superior in absolute terms of resolution. This is a measurable and repeatable phenomena. 3M mode is a downsampled version of the 6M image. This must result in data loss. So test results are not suprising.

-Chris
I've taken the same shot of a piece of paper of symbols and letters with these settings:
  • 3M Normal
  • 3M Fine
  • 6M Basic
  • 6M Normal
  • 6M Fine

I printed 8 x 10s of all of them, and the symbols and letters of the 3M Fine setting are the sharpest of all. Also, the color is more true.

P.S. My camera is a 3M camera and the 6M is interpolated, not 6M downsized to 3M.
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