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Old Jul 6, 2004, 8:48 PM   #1
csi
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I just got the S7000 and I am trying to play with the shutter speed and aperature but the instruction manual is pretty vague on how to use it. I am new to the whole digital camera thing but from what I have read a fast shutter speed would be 1/4000 of a second. If I am reading the numbers correctly on my Fuji S7000 I can only get the shutter speed down to 1 (no idea what that means) and as high as 1000 (again no idea what that means. Secondly is it possible to set the Shutter and Aperature or is one automatic based on the other.Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 6:12 PM   #2
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Wow, I guess its so vague that no one knows how to use it.
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 9:42 PM   #3
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The shutter sheed can only be adjusted in Shutter Priority to 1/1000. Thats pretty fast and in fact you usually dont need that fast of a speed and its normally unusual to have enough light to actually use that setting. In Aperature Priority it can however exceed that up to I believe 1/10,000 if there is enough light.

To shoot shutter priority, set the dial to "S" and turn the dial next to the neck strap attachment, to achieve the desired speed. You will notice that the aperature automatically changes to give more light for faster speeds. If the Apertature indicator turns red, you too fast to get a properly exposed shot. Its a tricky trade off because when you speed up the shutter speed the aperature number goes down (opens up more) so you loose depth of field. DOF is the area of focus. With a small depth of field (f2.8 for example) The background and forground will be out of focus quickly. With a large Depth of field (f8.0 for example) you will have a lot more in focus in the background and forground. If your wanting to shoot something like kids playing you will probably want something like 300-500. For portraits without movement, a setting of 125 would do well.

To shoot in Aperature Priorty turn the dial to "A" mode. As you turn the dial next to the neck strap attachment, the Aperature will go up and down. The shutter speed will automatically adjust. If you get to an aperature where the shutter speed can't be fast or slow enough, you will see the settings turn red. Aperature priorty works good to limit depth of field. For instance in a Macro shot, you might want everything blurry accept a small portion of a flower that is in focus. You would use something like F 2.8 (A large open aperature but it has a very narrow depth of field). If you were doing a landscape shot and wanted to get as much depth in the image as possible, you would use something like F 8.0 (A very small aperature opening but a wider depth of field).

The "P" mode on the camera allows you to spin the dial and get various combinations of Aperature/Shutter settings that will work together and you select the one that works best for you setting.

Hope that helps some.
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Old Jul 7, 2004, 11:29 PM   #4
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That helps a great deal, my biggest question I guess would be when I am in shutter priority, I can choose from 1 to 1000. Everything I read has shutter speed generaly listed as a fraction. I have guessed by playing with the camera that 1 is fastest and 1000 is the slowest, but I don't know what fractions they represent. But your response will help a great deal. Thanks.
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Old Jul 8, 2004, 7:36 AM   #5
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1000 is the fastest you can do in Shutter Priority. 1000 is actually 1/1000 of a second. 1 is a very slow shutter speed and it will shoot blurry shots unless you have a tripod. When you go down past 1 you will start seeing quotation marks which means its that many seconds for the shutter. 3" is a shutter speed of 3 seconds which is the slowest the shutter can go. It would be used for shooting night shots with little light and using a tripod with no flash.
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Old Jul 8, 2004, 9:45 AM   #6
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Now that is the answer I was looking for, thanks so much!!!!
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Old Jul 14, 2004, 3:27 PM   #7
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If you set the diaal to "M" you are in full manual mode meaning you set both the shutter speed and f stop. In this mode you can set a shutter speed anywhere from 1/10,000 to "B" for bulb, this setting holds the shutter open for as long as you keep the button pressed. In actual use, you would have a cable release connected to the shutter release button and the camera mounted on a tripod. In the manual mode, you set the aperture by holding down the exposure compensation button (+/-) while turning the neck strap knob.

I've used this trying to get some shots of a nightime thunderstorm rolling in and just guessing at the exposure times, (actual data is recorded with the image by the way) and got some very interesting results. The images appeared quite dark to black on the camera screen and as first downloaded to the computer. However when I brought up the image in Jasc's PSP (OK I'm too cheap to shell out for Photoshop), they were also black, but hitting the one step photo fix brought out shadow detail that was awesome! I'd really recomend trying this out, you can some weather shots you could only dream about with a film camera.
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 9:35 AM   #8
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That is so awesome, thanks so much for that info, I had not tried out manual, its nice to know I can change both Aperture and shutter speed if I need to. My camera just got a whole lot more fun.
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 10:58 PM   #9
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tleonhar
Just for info, I was using my S7000 for lightening shots and it did great. It seemed to work best at a shutter speed of 1.5 seconds with a tripod attached. This one was through a window but it gives you an idea of what I was getting.


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Old Jul 18, 2004, 1:10 AM   #10
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I've done some lightning shots as well.

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...ight=lightning

These shots were 3 second exposures, and completely unmodified.

Get outside and get a little wet, it's worth it! Very fun to shoot these. This thread talks a lot about the whole process of capturing lightning and there are some great tips in there.
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