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Old Jul 29, 2004, 4:49 PM   #11
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drewson wrote:
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Your problem could be the "default" DPI setting in PhotoShop. An imported image from a digital camera does not have a DPI factor, it is just a bunch of pixels. Photoshop must assign a DPI if the image is to be printed. I believe that your current default DPI setting in Photoshop is 75 DPI which renders images correct for web sites not for printing. If you set your default DPI to 200 - 300 your printed images will always be sharp.
This make sense, I should try opening the image in something else and seeing how it prints.
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Old Jul 30, 2004, 1:44 PM   #12
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Quebert,

All photos from all digital cameras come out at 72 pixels/inch on the computer screen. Pixels/inch is for the computer and DPI is for the printer. Depending on the megapixels, the resulting total pixel size is different (2 Mp = 1600 x 1200 max, and 4 MP = 2300 x 1700 max). I've printed many 8.5 x 11" photos from my 4MP camera with excellent results. I do use Photoshop Elements and check the "Scale to Fit to Media" box.

One thing to check is the default print quality if printing directly from the card. It may be on some sort of draft or plain paper mode unless you change it. That would be my guess given that it looks better when printed elsewhere.

Hope this helps.



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Old Jul 31, 2004, 2:36 AM   #13
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I printed the image in ACDSEE and it looked better then the one I did in PS. But, if I don't do the "shrink image to fit" it prints HUGE. the image is coming up like 1900x1200 pixels with a print size of 22 inches by 21 inches. So I manually knock it down to 6/4 in PS.



is this normal for most cameras? The 22x21 print size, I never had this problem on any other camera I've used.
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Old Aug 2, 2004, 11:25 AM   #14
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The large print size of a digital photo has been the case for all three of my digicams (Nikon 775, 4300 and Panasonic FZ-10). They're all 72 pixels/inch on the screen with a print size listed at 32" x 24" (2304 x 1708 pixels total) from a recent photo on my FZ10.
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Old Aug 4, 2004, 7:35 PM   #15
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The Ritz camera thing has me puzzled, was this card right out of the camera without any manipulation? For printing purposes do not resize the images, one day I was preparing some images for 4X6 printing (the normal camera files are not the correct aspect ratio for 4X6) and using the resize feature to check the dimensions. I accidently hit the OK button on one of the pictures. The resulting image was now a 4" X 6" image at 72dpi, in other words it was crap.

Use the "size to fit media" print option and the program will resize the image in memory to fit the paper at the resolution the printer is using (some interpolation may be involved if the printer is set for extremely high resolution). Any other attemts to resize the image, or change the ppi count will alter the image, and not necessarily for the better.

Ira
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Old Aug 18, 2004, 12:35 AM   #16
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To give some basic dpi information,

The total resolution of the camera pic will be based in pixels, 1600 x 1200 or what have you. The resolution photoshop sees, or other programs on the computer in general will be 72dpi. That is why the image looks so large on a computer screen. Most computer screens are set at 1024x768 pixels, or 800x600 if you don't have a large screen. So viewing a 1600 x 1200 image at 100% size on your computer would not fit, and a significant part of the image would be off the screens viewable area, unless you changed the "view" ratio to something else smaller, such as 50%. Do not mistake "view" with "resampling the image". Don't resample!

So based on this, when you have an image in photoshop, you'll have multiple image size settings that describe the image. The first will be the size in pixels, such as 1600 x 1200. For the best quality, keep the checkbox checked that keeps the ratio's of dpi vs. pixels locked.

Now, if an image is at 72dpi, you can either do one of two things....

Change the pixels from 1600 x 1200 (or approx a 2 megapixel image) to 800 x 600 and the dpi will go from 72dpi to 144 dpi effectively at 100% size. This is enough resolution to print most prints out on an inkjet printer to yield you an image thats about 5 x 4 inches total printed size at 100% size at 144dpi. If you have a high resolution printer, you'll want more dpi, such as 300 dpi. But this will drop the pixel setting to approx 400 x 300 or so. This would yield a final image size at 300dpi of about 1.5 inches x 1 inch. Keep in mind, there is enough pixels per inch, or dots per inch, for most printers to make a quality print at 150 dpi. So to print a quality image, you can determine the pixel depth needed at screen resolution to print a final image size of 150dpi. For an 8 x 10, you'll need an image size of about 1200 x 1500 at 150dpi, or 2400 x 3000 at 72 dpi. Now injet on the other hand can use images at about 100dpi and still have enough resolution to work with. So to print a poster at Kinko's or something, you could get decent quality by figuring your dpi at 100dpi. In the above example, a 30 x 20 inch wide poster would need near, or a little less, 3000 x 2000 pixelsat 72dpi, or 1500 x 1000 pixels at 144 dpi, or 750 x 500 pixels at 288dpi, and so forth. So, bottom line, a 6mp (3000x2000) captures enough resolution to print a 30 x 20 in poster, whereas a 4mp image (let's say 2200 x 1800) at 72dpi wouldn't capture enough resolution to print a quality print at 30 x 20 if you're trying to stay within the 100dpi minimum. In that case, you'd have to print an image that's 20 x 16 or something like that. If you printed at 22 x 18, you'd be printing at 100% of the resolution of the captured image, in this case only 72 dpi.... which you'd probably then see jagged images, pixelated areas, etc. on the printout.

I know this is wordy, so sorry. I hope it doesn't confuse anyone too much
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