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Old May 9, 2005, 5:15 PM   #1
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Hi I've had my camera since Christmas....and I think I've pretty much figured it out, but there are a few things that are frustrating me. First, is the DPI. No matter what I do, even on the highest MP Mode (F fine) when I open my pictures on my computer, they are always only 72 DPI. I'd like them to be 300 DPI. I don't know what I'm doing wrong! Also, I'm having trouble focusing in macro mode, I was trying to take closeup pics of flowers the other day, and whenever I'd get as close as I wanted, it wouldn't focus right.(Yes, I push the shutter down halfway to focus, but the little red AF! error pops up everytime.) Also, I'm having trouble with my wide angle and macro lenses. Whenever I have the wide angle lens on, there is a black circle around the frame, it goes away when I zoom a little, but then I'm pretty much where I was before I put the lens on. And the macro lens....well everything is super blurry with just that on. I don't know if the lens is garbage or I'm just not doing something right. I hope somebody can help me out...I'm going crazy here! LOL :?

Melanie
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Old May 9, 2005, 11:39 PM   #2
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When shooting JPEG images every digital camera that I know of works with a standard resolution of 72 PPI. You cannot change that. When you choose to use a higher quality setting, the camera just makes a big picture. And as far as I can tell, the difference between 4 MP normal and 4 MP fine is just a difference in how much compression is used on the image. If you shoot a RAW image, you will find that the resolution is 240 PPI, but the dimensions are much smaller. The camera has simply put all of those pixels in a smaller area and therefore the resolution is suitable for printing. What you'll need is some sort of image editing software that will allow you to make the dimensions of your image smaller. Doing this will essentially "compress" the pixels, or squeeze them into a smaller area. This will in turn increase the resolution.

Sorry, but I'm afraid I don't know what to tell you about your problem with your lenses. I don't have any of the extra lenses for my camera.
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Old May 10, 2005, 4:06 AM   #3
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Hi mschade, you are not doing anything wrong. Cameras dont know anything about DPI..That is only a setting for viewing or printing pictures, which you will see when viewing them on the monitor.

The main thing is to select in camera, the highest resolution, and least compression.. This gives the maximum pixels for the image. So then you can select/change the DPI to determine the resulting print size. i.e. if the image is say 2400 pixels wide, when choosing 300dpi, the print will only be 8" wide..But if you can accept 200dpi, the print will be 12" wide.. So you see, the DPI is not a function of the camera, but only a setting in viewing or printing images.
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Old May 10, 2005, 7:44 AM   #4
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jphess wrote:
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When shooting JPEG images every digital camera that I know of works with a standard resolution of 72 PPI. You cannot change that. When you choose to use a higher quality setting, the camera just makes a big picture. And as far as I can tell, the difference between 4 MP normal and 4 MP fine is just a difference in how much compression is used on the image. If you shoot a RAW image, you will find that the resolution is 240 PPI, but the dimensions are much smaller. The camera has simply put all of those pixels in a smaller area and therefore the resolution is suitable for printing. What you'll need is some sort of image editing software that will allow you to make the dimensions of your image smaller. Doing this will essentially "compress" the pixels, or squeeze them into a smaller area. This will in turn increase the resolution.

Sorry, but I'm afraid I don't know what to tell you about your problem with your lenses. I don't have any of the extra lenses for my camera.
Thank you so much for your reply. I'm happy to know it's nothing I'm doing wrong....right now I use Paint Shop Pro to edit my images, and I know how to change the resolution in there, I just thought there might be a way to do it in camera. Guess not! Hmmm, so if I change it to 200 or 300 DPI, the print will be better right?(The compression part confuses me, I always thoughtmore compression=less quality.)And does that help get rid of some of the visable noise?

I guess I better go play with some and see for myself.

Melanie
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Old May 10, 2005, 7:50 AM   #5
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Baz wrote:
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Hi mschade, you are not doing anything wrong. Cameras dont know anything about DPI..That is only a setting for viewing or printing pictures, which you will see when viewing them on the monitor.

The main thing is to select in camera, the highest resolution, and least compression.. This gives the maximum pixels for the image. So then you can select/change the DPI to determine the resulting print size. i.e. if the image is say 2400 pixels wide, when choosing 300dpi, the print will only be 8" wide..But if you can accept 200dpi, the print will be 12" wide.. So you see, the DPI is not a function of the camera, but only a setting in viewing or printing images.
Thank you for explaining this, it's really helped me understand a little better. Cause I always thought it was strange that they say a 4MP camera is only good for print sizes up to 8x10, but when I open the pics on my computer, the "actual print size" is something like 25"x30", or something huge like that! So if I up the resolution, the actual print size will be smaller, but when printed, it will look much better? I remember before when I had a cheapo HP 2MP camera, I made a couple of 8x10 enlargements, and they looked fine to me. And the camera info said "Best for print sizes up to 4x6."Well I'm off to play with some pictures from a wedding I photographed this weekend. Thanks for your reply!

Melanie
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Old May 10, 2005, 9:54 AM   #6
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Actually, we are talking about different things as far as compression is concerned. Whenever you save a JPEG image, the JPEG algorithm compresses the file to make it smaller. And this type of compression is harmful to the quality of the image. When you make the dimensions of an image smaller, it merely forces the pixels to move closer together. It doesn't change the pixels in any way. That is how the resolution is increased so that you can get an image that is suitable for printing. This does not change, or compress the pixels at all. I don't know anything about Paint Shop. I use Photoshop. When I Resize an image, I have an option to either resample or not. If I choose not to resample, Photoshop automatically increases the resolution to whatever the number of pixels will produce. If I do choose to resample, then Photoshop changes the dimensions of the image, but the resolution remains the same as it was originally. I'm sure Paint Shop has something very similar. I don't know if this has helped or not. If you have any more questions, feel free to ask and I will explain it as well as I understand it, which isn't all that great.
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Old May 12, 2005, 4:20 AM   #7
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Why are we talking about compression here? Melanie asked about DPI in the camera. So we got it sorted. The quality of images is determined by the pixels across X pixels down = the megapixels. Sure, if camera compresion is applied, the image will degrade. But she did not ask about that. She was worried about the DPI of the camera.

I thought we had got that sorted, as I mentioned in a previous reply, that cameras dont know about DPI. It is only a setting, that can be changed in software to determine the print size. Yes it is set at 72dpi, as that is the usual DPI of the monitor, but ya dont have to stick with that.
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Old May 12, 2005, 9:45 AM   #8
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Thanks for the replies you guys....I understand now about DPI in the cameraand how to change it on the computer. I've changed the DPI manually in PSP. Although honestly, I can't tell much of a difference! Oh well. Still having trouble with my lenses though. I did figure out how to focus a little better in macro with manual focus, although it's still far from perfect. Guess I just gotta keep practicing. Thanks for all your help!

Melanie
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Old May 12, 2005, 9:45 AM   #9
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Yes, you are correct, I should not have used that word. What I should have said is that when you reduce the dimensions of the image it squeezes or pushes the pixels closer together, which increases the resolution. The only time compression comes in to play is if you choose 4M-N or 4M-F on the 5100.

I would like to clarify something else that I stated in a previous comment. When I open a RAW image in the Adobe ACR plug-in, it reports the resolution at 240 PPI. After the image is converted to a JPEG or a TIF image the dimensions and resolution are still reported at 240 PPI. If I change the setting back to 72 PPI, I get the expected full dimensions of the image reported the same as when I shoot a JPEG image. I find this a little strange, but it doesn't really bother me. Those of you who have more experience than I, do other cameras behave in this manner?

Melanie,

You will not be able to see any difference in resolution on your computer monitor. The big difference will come into play if you tried to print a 8x10 from an image that is only 72 PPI. The reason you will not see any difference on the monitor is because most monitors only display 72 PPI. I understand, but don't know for sure, that Mac monitors display at 96 PPI. So looking at anything at higher resolution on your monitor isn't going to reveal any changes or improvements.
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Old May 12, 2005, 10:01 AM   #10
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jphess wrote:

Melanie,

You will not be able to see any difference in resolution on your computer monitor. The big difference will come into play if you tried to print a 8x10 from an image that is only 72 PPI. The reason you will not see any difference on the monitor is because most monitors only display 72 PPI. I understand, but don't know for sure, that Mac monitors display at 96 PPI. So looking at anything at higher resolution on your monitor isn't going to reveal any changes or improvements.



Ahhh. I see. I didn't realize that monitors only displayed at 72 DPI. That makes sense that I wouldn't see a difference after changing the DPI. But, I'm looking forward to seeing the difference in print! I have my own photography business, and all the prints so far have been from 72 DPI, and they looked good to me (and my customers) but, I can't wait to see how much better they can be with a higher resolution. I'm sure my customers will be happier too if they look that much better.

Melanie

http://www.look-at-me-photography.com

(added link to my website in case anybody wants to see
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