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Old Oct 21, 2005, 2:06 PM   #21
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Yarnspinner,

I use a slightly different method from Spyder, I leave the original file alone of course, but I use the crop tool in PS Elements. I set the horizontal and vertical size (example, 4" and 6" for an album sized print) and then the resolution at 300dpi. I then use the tool to crop the image (remember not to crop too small an areaor you will get an interpolated enlargement which may look bad) and the result is the correct size and resolution.

As Spyder says, ignore the 72dpi and the resulting image size, these are just arbitrary numbers based on typical monitor screen resolution, this has absolutely nothing to do with the number of pixels per inch that will be printed.

Ira
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Old Oct 21, 2005, 4:43 PM   #22
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Thank you Spyder and Ira. I'll get the hang of all this soon.

I do save the original file from the transferal from raw, just in case. I also save the changes I make to another file. You can never be too careful.


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Old Oct 21, 2005, 8:00 PM   #23
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Yarnspinner,

The 5200 looks like the camera I was looking for a while back, what I mean is that, in a long past thread I suggested that extending lenses on this class of camera was rediculous since they were too large to fit in most posckets anyway. It is as if Fuji read my post, the S9000 is almost exactly what I suggested and the S5200 is the next best thing.

I like your work so far, this camera may be just the thing to really fire your creativity. I also come from a film SLR background, Pentax and then Minolta Maxxum, not Canon, and I still have difficulty with DSLR prices so I have a Fuji S7000. There is some of my work at http://aicphotography.tripod.com , although these pictures come from film cameras, my Pentax Optio 33L, my wife's Fuji 2800Z and my S7000.

Ira
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Old Oct 22, 2005, 12:06 AM   #24
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Hi Ira,

Enjoyed your website. Nice pics. Do you get business off it?

I bought the Canon and Mamiya back around 1980. You know, when ISO was known as ASA. I have too much invested in each to even think of changing brands, beside, the cameras perform as good today as they did theday I bought them. They made pro cameras indestructable back then.

What I like about the S5200 is it maintains the photographic workability of the S9000 at a much lower price. I like that I can shoot AP, SP, orAutoat the click of a switch, just like on the Canon. I like the ISO range from 64-1600 and I can set them at will. I like the quickness of changing from normal to macro and not having to change film touse a faster or slower ISO. Finally, I like the fact that I'll be able to darkroom the results from raw files as soon as Photoshop acknowledges my camera, which should not be too long. Until then I'll work around. All of this for around $325 street price.

Nits. I would rather manual focus be adjusted with the lens, not the tele/wide toggle. I have doubts about the accuracy. Also, I would much prefer a metal tripod mount ratherthan the plastic one provided. I see those plastic threads getting chewed up quickly. I have a tripod quick mount board I can screw into it but I'll have to remove it to change batteries, which will be often enough to cause problems down the road I'm sure. But then, the cost of the camera is less than what I paid for most of the lenses I use with my Canon. It's almost a disposable. When I rot out the tripod mount I'll just buy a new one and pass the camera on to one of the grandkids who want to learn the trade.

Bottom line, it's fun to experiment without having to be concernced with film/developing costs. At $11 a roll for Velvia plus another $8 for processing, film shooting gets expensive. I don't have to tell you the cost of shooting a wedding on film. Then if you want the slides transferred to disc, it's another $20 bucks. Shooting 120 or 220 is more costly still. Shooting fashion, which requires a lot of experimenting, is even more expensive. The S5200 will eliminate a lot of the costs to being imaginative.

Do you work in medium format for weddings?

Erick
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Old Oct 22, 2005, 6:40 AM   #25
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Erick,

The only medium format camera I own is an old Yashica D (the good one with the Yashinon lens), I only used it for the Bride and Groom portraits and shot everything else in 35mm. In August I shot an entire wedding with my Fuji S7000 and the results were great, maybe not as much potential for big enlargements (16" X 20" is do-able however) but the immediate feedback allowed me to experiment more. The Fuji even allows me to use my old Vivitar 285 flash. Eventually I will get myself a digital SLR, probably a Pentax but Minolta is still a possibility, however I am in no rush since this Fuji offers more advantages than limitations.

Ira
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