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Old Jan 19, 2006, 12:44 PM   #11
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Ira,

I followed your discussions several months ago when you were trying to make a decision about which camera to purchase. I envy you for being able to get and use the Pentax SLR. I have quite a different perspective on what I require in a camera. I have had a disability since birth, and am quite shaky and my fine motor skills are not very good. Photography is probably one of the most illogical hobbies for me to embrace. The 9000 is my fourth digital camera. The first 2 were quite small (P&S) cameras, one of them was the Pentex Optio 550. It is a reasonably good 5 MP camera, but it is so small that it was very difficult for me to handle it. One of the reasons I decided on the 9000 is the fact that it is a larger camera, and I have found that it is much easier for me to manipulate the controls. Whenever I set out to take a bunch of landscape pictures I always carry along a big heavy ugly tripod. But it works for me. With the 9000 it is easy for me to change the settings in the field. Most of the time, when we are at family gatherings or similar activities, I will hand the camera off to my wife or one of my daughters, and then I just more or less direct the shooting. Because I am quite shaky, I decided it would be in my best interest not to have to change lenses. So the long zoom capability of the 9000 was another consideration. I probably should have considered cameras from other manufacturers that feature image stabilization. But the 9000 appealed to me. And I am glad I made the choice that I did.

Jim
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Old Jan 25, 2006, 10:10 PM   #12
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These cameras take awesome pictures, thanks for sharing guys!
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Old Jan 27, 2006, 1:34 PM   #13
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Jim

Sorry about the late reply I have been busy lately. I understand what you mean about needing an all in one camera, and I do believe you have made the best choice. Most of the image stabilization schemes in use are only effective to a degree, and the S9000 is an absolute joy to use due to the excellent placement of controls. My experience is with the S7000, which is very similar except for one big plus of the S9000, the manual zoom.

I believe that this is an excellent choice of hobby for you. Your postings here have shown that you have an eye for composition and the fact that you must use a tripod means that you do use it (something the rest of use should learn from). This gives you the time to think about what you are trying to achieve rather than simply snapping away and hoping for the best (something I am often guilty of). Your pictures are far sharper than most because of your big ugly tripod. The articulated LCD on the S9000 also makes it a great choice for tripod work (much like my old Yashica TLR with reflex viewfinder). The 9MP resolution of that camera also gives you the capability of producing very large prints. I looked at some 12" X 18" prints from a 6MP camera just yesterday and they were marvelous, the 9MP should easily produce a decent print in this size and quite acceptable at 20" X 24".

Keep up the good work, I look forward to seeing more of your "experiments in colour" soon.

Ira
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Old Jan 27, 2006, 4:33 PM   #14
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Hi!

I have posted an article on the s9500 yesterday and the very positive experiences I have had with this camera. I myself have developed a disability in the past year (multiple schlerosis) which affecte the right side of my body, and recently my right arm. I tend to drop things! and I have always used a SLR. The wide range of possibilities with the Fuji lens means that I no longer have to constantly change, refocus, etc lens. I shall have liked to have tried a camera with some type of stabilisation but have seen mixed reports on their effectivity. Without doubt the best stabilisation device is a tripod and manual shutter release. I believe Fuji were aware of this fact! hence the ability to use a cheap manual shutter release.

This camera can produce astounding picture quality either using in fully auto mode and particularly usung the numerous semi automatic and manual modes. I have owned my camera for 4 weeks and after getting used to the controls I believe I have made a good buy!

I love the cake pictures!!
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Old Jan 27, 2006, 8:08 PM   #15
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Davrus

I totally agree regarding the cable release, I wish other camera makers would put that feature back instead of expensive proprietary electronic releases.

Ira
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Old Jan 27, 2006, 10:09 PM   #16
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I've been with my S9000 since Wednesday afternoon. I was a bit worried as I got it from Abe's of Maine (who's actually in Brooklyn NY). Came with all the goodies, nothing missing. I never installed the software with it. I'm running Windows XP Pro with SP2 and, like my Toshiba PDR2300, I just plug in the USB, turn the camera to play, and the computer found new hardware and recognized it. I just go into "My Computer" click on the removable drive (camera), click the folders down to where the imageas are, select all, right click on one of them and choose "MOVE". I put the images in a folder I have pre-made before connecting the camera to the PC. they move all the images over, and I'm empty and good to go. Easy to manipulate, really. I just found and bought a wonderful RAW file converter/editor online called RAW Photo Desk http://www.rawphotodesk.com for only $29.95 It converts RAW (*.raf) for me and let's me do a good job of doing some editing right in the program. My Adobe won't recognize the raw of the Fuji S9000 but this little program does excellent!! Take a peek sometime.



The images are just absolutely stunning. I've pritned at 8X11.5 and even heavily cropped the images and printed on my color HP at 8X11.5 and I must say, I have not seen the detail and resolution like since working on 4X5 film camera stuff (I have 2 of them *S*) Here is a picture of Leo our fat tubbo cat lying on the carpet. I took it with RAW in the camera and manipulated there in the RAW Photo Deck software. I have not removed the "green" eyes that cats get from flash as yet. But even sized down, look at the hairs and whiskers!! Sharp!

Vern


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Old Jan 28, 2006, 9:01 AM   #17
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Davrus, welcome to the forum. I haven't had my camera much longer than you have had yours. But I think you will find that the more you use it the better you will like it.

Everyone, thank you for the comments. I wonder how long it will take for digital photography to catch on.:lol: We have a local photographer who has beautiful landscapes taken in the local mountains. They are on display at several of the local Wendy's eating establishments in the area. I talked with him one day and asked him what he thought of all this digital photography stuff. And he stated emphatically that he didn't like it, that he didn't have a digital camera, and that he would never consider getting one. According to him, any CCD is simply too small, and it was impossible to capture the detail and have the latitude that he has using film. Then, I have a nephew who is in charge of the digital photography lab at Brigham Young University. At a wedding reception recently I asked him how much of his photography was digital now. And he rather smugly stated that he didn't own a digital camera and never would. He basically made the same claims as my other friend. And besides that, he stated, if I want a digital image all I have to do is turn to the scanner and I have it. Then I come home and look at some of my images that I have taken with the S9000, and I wonder if my eyes are really that bad or are my photographic expectations so low that I can't appreciate just how poor the quality of my digital images is. Yes, I know there are other cameras that will produce higher quality images than the S9000, but this is good enough for me.
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Old Jan 28, 2006, 9:41 AM   #18
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Morning jphess! (at least for me in Michigan *S*)



Your examples, your nephew and the local display photographer are both right in their assesment as a certain point of view. Film has certain advantages over digital. Digial has certain advantages over film. Both statements are true. Referr to a link here to ready why "Film vs Digital" http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/filmdig.htm



Films latitude is certainly much greater and the handling of the highlights is better in film, but here is a guy that shoots thousands of picutres on digital per week and also shoots $1000 worth of film the next week. For the majority of blow ups to 8X10 to 11X14 (thereabout) it's hard to beat digital. Considering that a 35mm film camera reproduces some 25 Megapixels and a medium format aroudn 100 megapixels the resolution is pretty obvious in extreme blow ups. (see the article for a great example). However they both have their place and unless you want to fork out $50,000 for a professional grade scaner (film to digital) you will always loose some information and detail in the film to digital scan conversion.



I truly love my S9000 pictures. They have an issue with chromatic aberation, but that is mostly taken at the extremes of the focal lengths of the lens. And there is a nice software package that can completely eliminate the chromatci aberation (blue fringing) called Photo Acute Studio.



Bottom line is that the Fuji S9000 is in my opinion better than it's nearest competitor the Panazonic FZ30 and others, not only considering image quality but designed in photographic features. ..... my 2 cents worth *vern" Former Nebraskan


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Old Jan 28, 2006, 9:52 AM   #19
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Well, I will admit that there is nothing like film for extreme quality. But even Nikon has recognized the digital revolution. You are probably aware of this, but they recently announced that they are going to cease production of all film cameras except for one high-end professional SLR.
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 9:06 AM   #20
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Monza76: I totally agree with you on the point of the tripod. I've had a lot of film experience, and one of the key things is " You want a sharper image, don't buy a new camera use a tripod!" It has been demonstrated many times the difference even at 1/125 shutter between handhold and tripod for image sharpness. One of the old tricks used in the days of darkrooms was to "thump" the enlarger board during the exposure of the paper to get a softer affect (portraits and such) The head would move so slightly and it was de-sharpening the harsh lines of so many of the sharp taking lenses. I have a photo of an open Bible I took in a church with a Contax camera. Blew it up to 11X14 and framed it. Get out the magnifying glass and you can read many parts of both pages, an the bible is only about 1/3 of the total image on the 35mm film, but I used a tripod.

I think when people post about unsharp images they are NOT paying attention to the little "handshake" image in the viewfinder(s), and are getting camera shake rather than the camera not taking sharp focused pictures. If you use the EVF instead of the LCD on the back you have a tendency to hold it properly and tighter/steadier for taking the picture. Try taking 2 pictures sometime, both the same, still life subject, but one with EVF and one with LCD held out there away from your face. It's very hard to keep your outstretched arms steadier that that of the camera next to your eye. Better yet, take a 3rd picture, same scene, same settings, but on a tripod and then view ALL the results well zoomed in.



jphess: I was unaware of the Nikon discontinue of the lower end film cameras!:O

and you have a great eye for photgraphic composures! Really like the canyon scene!


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